Comparing two similar parables

Discussion in '2004 Archive' started by James_Newman, Oct 19, 2004.

  1. James_Newman

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    Matt 25
    14 For the kingdom of heaven is as a man travelling into a far country, who called his own servants, and delivered unto them his goods.
    15 And unto one he gave five talents, to another two, and to another one; to every man according to his several ability; and straightway took his journey.
    16 Then he that had received the five talents went and traded with the same, and made them other five talents.
    17 And likewise he that had received two, he also gained other two.
    18 But he that had received one went and digged in the earth, and hid his lord's money.
    19 After a long time the lord of those servants cometh, and reckoneth with them.
    20 And so he that had received five talents came and brought other five talents, saying, Lord, thou deliveredst unto me five talents: behold, I have gained beside them five talents more.
    21 His lord said unto him, Well done, thou good and faithful servant: thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler over many things: enter thou into the joy of thy lord.
    22 He also that had received two talents came and said, Lord, thou deliveredst unto me two talents: behold, I have gained two other talents beside them.
    23 His lord said unto him, Well done, good and faithful servant; thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler over many things: enter thou into the joy of thy lord.
    24 Then he which had received the one talent came and said, Lord, I knew thee that thou art an hard man, reaping where thou hast not sown, and gathering where thou hast not strawed:
    25 And I was afraid, and went and hid thy talent in the earth: lo, there thou hast that is thine.
    26 His lord answered and said unto him, Thou wicked and slothful servant, thou knewest that I reap where I sowed not, and gather where I have not strawed:
    27 Thou oughtest therefore to have put my money to the exchangers, and then at my coming I should have received mine own with usury.
    28 Take therefore the talent from him, and give it unto him which hath ten talents.
    29 For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall have abundance: but from him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he hath.
    30 And cast ye the unprofitable servant into outer darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

    Luke 19
    12 He said therefore, A certain nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return.
    13 And he called his ten servants, and delivered them ten pounds, and said unto them, Occupy till I come.
    14 But his citizens hated him, and sent a message after him, saying, We will not have this man to reign over us.
    15 And it came to pass, that when he was returned, having received the kingdom, then he commanded these servants to be called unto him, to whom he had given the money, that he might know how much every man had gained by trading.
    16 Then came the first, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained ten pounds.
    17 And he said unto him, Well, thou good servant: because thou hast been faithful in a very little, have thou authority over ten cities.
    18 And the second came, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained five pounds.
    19 And he said likewise to him, Be thou also over five cities.
    20 And another came, saying, Lord, behold, here is thy pound, which I have kept laid up in a napkin:
    21 For I feared thee, because thou art an austere man: thou takest up that thou layedst not down, and reapest that thou didst not sow.
    22 And he saith unto him, Out of thine own mouth will I judge thee, thou wicked servant. Thou knewest that I was an austere man, taking up that I laid not down, and reaping that I did not sow:
    23 Wherefore then gavest not thou my money into the bank, that at my coming I might have required mine own with usury?
    24 And he said unto them that stood by, Take from him the pound, and give it to him that hath ten pounds.
    25 (And they said unto him, Lord, he hath ten pounds.)
    26 For I say unto you, That unto every one which hath shall be given; and from him that hath not, even that he hath shall be taken away from him.
    27 But those mine enemies, which would not that I should reign over them, bring hither, and slay them before me.

    Here we have two parables about the kingdom, almost alike. They have the same premise, the Lord distributing to His servants, then coming back and reckoning with them. The faithful servants are rewarded, and the wicked slothful servant loses even what he has. However, the parable in luke includes another element, which is the enemies, who would not have the Lord to reign over them. These are brought before Him and slain.

    My question is this: who are the faithful servants, who are the wicked servants, and who are the enemies?
     
  2. koreahog2005

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    The parable of the talents (Matthew 25:14-30) is indeed similar to the parable of the minas or pounds (Luke 19:11-27). (The talent and mina were well-known forms of money, but the talent was worth much more than the mina.) The first two slaves in the parables produced fruit, and Jesus commended both of them with the same words: “Well done, good and faithful slave” (Matthew 25:21, 23). The third slave hid his talent in the ground (compartmentalized it), and Jesus called him wicked and lazy (Matthew 25:26). Jesus also commanded that the slave be cast into the place of eternal judgment (Matthew 25:30). I think this third slave represents the same type of non-Christian who pretends to be a Christian that the thorny soil represents in the parable of the sower and soils. Craig Blomberg, an associate professor of New Testament at Denver Seminary, discussed the third slave as described in Matthew 25: 24-27:

    (Blomberg, “Matthew,” The New American Commentary, vol. 22, 1992, pages 373-374)

    Notice the word “hesitating” in the above comment. Remember that Elijah asked the people at Mount Carmel, “How long will you hesitate between two opinions?” (1 Kings 18:21) The “thorny soil” people hesitate (procrastinate) until they make the willful decision to neglect their salvation. Later they hesitate in a different sense as the word is slowly choked. Oknēros is translated as “lagging behind” in Romans 12:11. There is never an overt rejection, but the word they tried to compartmentalize becomes more and more uncomfortable for them. Spiritually perceptive people notice that these pretenders are lagging behind others who genuinely became Christians at the same time that the pretenders made their false professions of faith. The pretenders continue to commit sins of ignorance due to their depravity, and a gradual hardening process continues until their physical deaths.

    Concerning the parable of the talents, many people think the talents represent abilities. That is an incorrect conclusion. The talents were distributed to each person “according to his own ability” (Matthew 25:15). Obviously, abilities would not be distributed according to abilities already possessed.

    The talent hidden by the third slave represents the word of God received from the Master while under the special conviction of the Holy Spirit. The third slave never made an ultimate, final decision to commit his life to the Master in repentance and faith. The word was not invested in other areas of his life. The “worry of the world” (Matthew 13:22) choked the word. Just as the third slave hid the talent, so the “thorny soil” people try to hide Jesus in one part of their lives rather than allowing Jesus to take control of every part of their lives.

    The apostle Paul described himself and other Christians with him as “servants of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God” (1 Corinthians 4:1). Paul also said that he wanted “to make known with boldness the mystery of the gospel” (Ephesians 6:19). By willfully neglecting and thereby rejecting the gospel seed, the “thorny soil” people prove themselves to be very poor stewards of it.
     
  3. Dr. Bob

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    What do each represent? Many ideas. It is a parable, which is NOT designed to teach doctrine, but to illustrate (para-ballo, to throw along side).

    I am truly hesitant to read much into any parable other than some general principles. You can sure get messed up "doctrine" trying elsewise.
     
  4. James_Newman

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    I think the talents and the pounds could be representative of any gift given to a servant of Christ that He intends to be used for His kingdom. The talents and the pounds could just as easily represent money. Why it should particularly represent 'the word' is not evident to me. There may be some corollation to the parable of the sower (they are indeed both talking about the kingdom) but the pictures do not really have anything to do with one another. The sower parable is talking about recieving the truth of the kingdom. These parables are dealing more with the responsibility of a believer to produce fruit.

    On what do you base this assumption? Why would Christ call an unsaved man His servant? How do you arrive to the conclusion that this servant is a counterfeit? Does Christ not know His servants from the unsaved?

    Matt 25:19 After a long time the lord of those servants cometh, and reckoneth with them.
    Luke 19:15 And it came to pass, that when he was returned, having received the kingdom, then he commanded these servants to be called unto him, to whom he had given the money, that he might know how much every man had gained by trading.

    This sounds an awful lot like the judgment seat of Christ. Where do we ever see saved and unsaved being judged together for their works? We don't. But we do see the Lord giving crowns to His overcoming saints.

    2Cor 5
    10 For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ; that every one may receive the things done in his body, according to that he hath done, whether it be good or bad.
    11 Knowing therefore the terror of the Lord, we persuade men; but we are made manifest unto God; and I trust also are made manifest in your consciences.

    2Tim 4:8 Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, shall give me at that day: and not to me only, but unto all them also that love his appearing.

    Rev 20
    4 And I saw thrones, and they sat upon them, and judgment was given unto them: and I saw the souls of them that were beheaded for the witness of Jesus, and for the word of God, and which had not worshipped the beast, neither his image, neither had received his mark upon their foreheads, or in their hands; and they lived and reigned with Christ a thousand years.
    5 But the rest of the dead lived not again until the thousand years were finished. This is the first resurrection.
    6 Blessed and holy is he that hath part in the first resurrection: on such the second death hath no power, but they shall be priests of God and of Christ, and shall reign with him a thousand years.

    Luke 19
    16 Then came the first, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained ten pounds.
    17 And he said unto him, Well, thou good servant: because thou hast been faithful in a very little, have thou authority over ten cities.
    18 And the second came, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained five pounds.
    19 And he said likewise to him, Be thou also over five cities.

    And what about the enemies, what did He say about them?

    Luke 19:27 But those mine enemies, which would not that I should reign over them, bring hither, and slay them before me.

    Bring hither. That means they weren't there. The 'enemies' of this Lord were not present at the 'judgment' of His servants.

    Rev 20
    7 And when the thousand years are expired, Satan shall be loosed out of his prison,
    12 And I saw the dead, small and great, stand before God; and the books were opened: and another book was opened, which is the book of life: and the dead were judged out of those things which were written in the books, according to their works.
    13 And the sea gave up the dead which were in it; and death and hell delivered up the dead which were in them: and they were judged every man according to their works.
    14 And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire. This is the second death.
    15 And whosoever was not found written in the book of life was cast into the lake of fire.

    After the 1000 years, people come out of hell to be judged. They will be 'brought hither', and many of them will be slain before Him.
     
  5. James_Newman

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    2 Timothy 3:16
    All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness:

    I understand Dr Bob's reluctance to use parables for doctrine. Parables can be heavy, you might sprain your faith. But over and over, Jesus taught that believers are going to be judged for their works. You would have to show me some scriptural evidence to prove that Jesus did not want us to draw doctrine from His parables.

    Matt 13
    10 And the disciples came, and said unto him, Why speakest thou unto them in parables?
    11 He answered and said unto them, Because it is given unto you to know the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven, but to them it is not given.
    13 Therefore speak I to them in parables: because they seeing see not; and hearing they hear not, neither do they understand.
    16 But blessed are your eyes, for they see: and your ears, for they hear.

    9 Who hath ears to hear, let him hear.
     
  6. gb93433

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    Jesus addressed the issue of parables in Matthew 13:10-17, And the disciples came and said to Him, "Why do You speak to them in parables?" Jesus answered them, "To you it has been granted to know the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven, but to them it has not been granted. "For whoever has, to him [more] shall be given, and he will have an abundance; but whoever does not have, even what he has shall be taken away from him. "Therefore I speak to them in parables; because while seeing they do not see, and while hearing they do not hear, nor do they understand."In their case the prophecy of Isaiah is being fulfilled, which says, `You will keep on hearing, but will not understand; You will keep on seeing, but will not perceive; For the heart of this people has become dull, With their ears they scarcely hear, And they have closed their eyes, Otherwise they would see with their eyes, Hear with their ears, And understand with their heart and return, And I would heal them.' "But blessed are your eyes, because they see; and your ears, because they hear. "For truly I say to you that many prophets and righteous men desired to see what you see, and did not see it, and to hear what you hear, and did not hear it.
     
  7. koreahog2005

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    James, you said the following:

    I think it is obvious that the third slave was unsaved. He will be cast into “the outer darkness; in that place there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth” (Matthew 25:30). Christians aren’t cast into hell.

    Notice in Matthew how the place where there is weeping and gnashing of teeth always refers to hell:

    Matthew 8:12 – “But the sons of the kingdom shall be cast out into the outer darkness; in that place there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.”

    Matthew 13:42 – “And will throw them into the furnace of fire; in that place there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.”

    Matthew 13:50 – “And will throw them into the furnace of fire; there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.”

    Matthew 22:13 – “Then the king said to the servants, ‘Bind him hand and foot, and cast him into the outer darkness; in that place there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’”

    Matthew 24:51 – “And shall cut him in pieces and assign him a place with the hypocrites; weeping shall be there and the gnashing of teeth.”

    James, you asked why Christ would call an unsaved man His servant. I think every human being ever created fits into God’s sovereign plan whether they like it or not. God uses both the elect and the non-elect to accomplish His sovereign will. In that sense, every human being is a servant of God. The elect are willing servants, and the non-elect are unwilling servants. In a similar sense, non-elect Jews are referred to as “sons of the kingdom” in Matthew 8:12.

    There are some interesting points of comparison between the parable of the talents and the parable of the sower and soils.

    1. In both parables, not all elect people bear the same amount of fruit. (Matthew 13:23 – hundredfold, sixty, thirty; Matthew 25:20-23 – five, two)
    2. In both parables, the non-elect people bear no fruit.
    3. In both parables, the non-elect people receive or experience something but do not whole-heartedly accept it. They don’t allow the risky investment of their lives.

    With both the thorny soil and the slave who buried his talent there is a willful neglect. The author of Hebrews asked a rhetorical question regarding this type of willful neglect (Hebrews 2:3a): “How can we escape if we neglect so great a salvation?” The Greek word for “neglect” ( ameleō ) is also used in Matthew 22:5 to describe those who “paid no attention” to an invitation to a wedding feast. In Matthew 22:3 we find that these people were “unwilling to come.” They were sent to the place where there is weeping and gnashing of teeth (hell). This type of intentional neglect of the gospel is a willful, unpardonable sin.

    [ October 20, 2004, 02:40 AM: Message edited by: koreahog2005 ]
     
  8. James_Newman

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    Ok, so if every unsaved human being fits into the wicked servant category, you still havent addressed why there is another class of people, this Lords enemies who would not have Him to reign over them. Nor have you addressed the fact that the wicked servants are being judged with the faithful servants, while the enemies are not present. I think your belief that a Christian can never go to hell is clouding your interpretation of these scriptures. Can you show me one scripture that says a Christian will never go to hell? The bible clearly shows death and hell giving up the dead before the great white throne judgment. Where does it say that no Christians come up out of hell with the unbelievers? The fact that the book of life has to be consulted shows that there are people in there who are written in the book of life. Otherwise, God would hardly need to look.

    Rev 20:15 And whosoever was not found written in the book of life was cast into the lake of fire.

    How do we get from there to 'And no one in hell is written in the book of life'? This is a traditional belief that has little more than emotion backing it up.
     
  9. koreahog2005

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    James, you said the following:

    There are no enemies discussed in the parable of the talents. I think you are referring to the enemies in the parable of the minas (Luke 19:14, 27). The reason for this parable is given in Luke 19:11. It was because Jesus was near Jerusalem. The enemies refer to the Jews in general who did not want Him to reign over them. Of course, there were individual Jews who accepted Him as their Lord (illustrated by the first and second slaves in the parable). Judgment did come to the Jews in general in 70 AD. The Romans attacked Jerusalem, and the temple was destroyed.

    James, you also said:

    In the parable the first servant comes. Later the second servant comes. Still later the third servant comes. They are not all judged at the same time. There is a sequence. The third slave is an enemy, and as in the parallel account in Matthew 25:28-30, what he has is taken from him, and he suffers judgment.

    James, you asked me about who goes to hell:

    John 3:36 – “He who believes in the Son has eternal life; but he who does not obey the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God abides on him.”
    If a Christian’s spirit can go to spiritual Hades (hell), then he does not have eternal life. In spiritual Hades people experience wrath, not life in the sense mentioned in John 3:36.

    John 5:24 – “Truly, truly, I say to you, he who hears My word, and believes Him who sent Me, has eternal life, and does not come into judgment, but has passed out of death into life.”
    A Christian has already passed out of spiritual death into spiritual life. He cannot suffer the temporary judgment of spiritual Hades or the eternal judgment of the lake of fire.

    Finally, you said the following:

    All those whose spirits were in spiritual Hades are thrown into the lake of fire in their resurrection bodies (Revelation 20:14), and no Christians are involved in this last resurrection. The Christians' bodies will have already been resurrected before the non-Christians' bodies are resurrected and thrown into the lake of fire (Revelation 17:14; 19:8; 19:14; 20:4-5). Hades sometimes refers to the grave (Acts 2:27; Acts 2:31; 1 Corinthians 15:55). The bodies of Christians experience the grave, but their spirits do not. Paul said he would prefer “to be absent from the body and to be at home with the Lord” (2 Corinthians 5:8). In the parable of Luke 16:23, however, Hades is seen as a place of torment for the evil rich man, whereas the poor man Lazarus was in “Abraham’s bosom” (Luke 16:24), and there was a great chasm between the two places (Luke 16:26). Jesus told one of the thieves that they would both be in Paradise that same day (Luke 23:43). Thus, there is a temporary place of fellowship and a temporary place of punishment. The spirits of Christians go to the place of fellowship, not to the place of punishment. Jesus went to a place of punishment (a spiritual prison) just before His resurrection to proclaim victory and judgment (1 Peter 3:19).

    It's bedtime in Korea. [​IMG]

    [ October 20, 2004, 12:50 PM: Message edited by: koreahog2005 ]
     
  10. av1611jim

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    Kreahog says; John 3:36 – “He who believes in the Son has eternal life; but he who does not obey the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God abides on him.”
    If a Christian’s spirit can go to spiritual Hades (hell), then he does not have eternal life. In spiritual Hades people experience wrath, not life in the sense mentioned in John 3:36.

    John 5:24 – “Truly, truly, I say to you, he who hears My word, and believes Him who sent Me, has eternal life, and does not come into judgment, but has passed out of death into life.”
    A Christian has already passed out of spiritual death into spiritual life. He cannot suffer the temporary judgment of spiritual Hades or the eternal judgment of the lake of fire.

    Sir, you have made conclusions about these two passages which the text does not support. While true that a Christian CANNOT lose his salvation nor spend ETERNITY in hell, you jump the boat when you say that he cannot suffer temporary judgement for his unfaithfulness and disobedience to his LORD. These Scriptures do not support your theory.
    Kindly support your theory with relevant Scripture. K?
    In His service;
    Jim
    BTW where is it written that the unbelieving and fearful cannot enter the Kingdom of Christ? Just because you fear this Truth or disbelieve it does not make it untrue. Jesus made it quite clear that only the faithful will receive permission to enter His Kingdom. We are not talking about salvation in eternity but REWARDS for the faithful. And those rewards are just as temporary as the punishments we are telling you about.
     
  11. koreahog2005

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    Av1611jim, a Christian can certainly suffer judgment (punishment, discipline) before he physically dies. 1 Corinthians 11:32 says, “But when we are judged, we are disciplined by the Lord in order that we may not be condemned along with the world.” Hebrews 12:5-11 mentions the discipline of the Lord that yields “the peaceful fruit of righteousness.” According to Romans 14:10 and 2 Corinthians 5:10 all Christians must appear before the judgment seat of Christ. At that time, according to 1 Corinthians 3:12-15, the Christian is safe, but the quality of his work will be revealed to determine specific rewards. It's his bad works that are burned, not the Christian himself (1 Corinthians 3:15). After he physically dies, however, the Christian immediately goes to be with the Lord. There is no purgatory or spiritual Hades for Christians. They had already passed from death to life before they physically died. Their treatment immediately after physical death is quite different from that experienced by non-Christians. John 5:24 says that Christians do not “come into judgment”; that is, Christians do not experience the punishment in Hades described in the case of the evil rich man in Luke 16:23 or in the lake of fire.
     
  12. Dr. Bob

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    Innocently looking for doctrine in this parable is just another ploy of the "christians burn in hell" bunch. Stay away from their grace-denying position.

    Dr. Bob
    HE THAT BELIEVES IS NOT CONDEMNED!!
     
  13. Johnv

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    I must agree with Dr Bob on his posts about parables. The parables were stories intended to illustrate a doctrine, but the parables were not intended to be doctrine themselves, nor were they intended to be factual stories, nor replacements for established doctrine. Though I don't think James Newman is guilty of this here, I generally get concerned when someone uses the "all scripture is given by inspiration" verse to imply that every single textual scribble is intended to be doctrinal. This leads to lack of contexual understanding, and misapplying of scriptural teachings."All we like sheep" is very dangerous (not to mention messy) without the corresponding "have gone astray". Don't get me wrong, I love sheep, especially when eating gyros.
     
  14. DeafPosttrib

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    Should we continued sinning under the grace? - Romans 6:1-2 God forbid.

    In Christ
    Rev. 22:20 -Amen!
     
  15. DeafPosttrib

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    I disagree.

    All parables always are doctrine, period. Because, all of these are teaching about our spiritual life, that 2 Tim. 3:16 telling us, these are reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness. Obivously, all parables are invlove 2 Tim. 3:16. All of these are part of doctrines. We must give heed attention the instructions and warnings of the parables, and to obey what Christ saying.

    Many think, these parables seem not important or not apply to us. Wrong. All of these always are important for every individuals of us, to apply our spiritual life with instructions and warnings. We cannot neglect these parables, we should listen and obey what Christ saying in the parables.

    In Christ
    Rev. 22:20 -Amen!
     
  16. koreahog2005

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    I agree that we have to be careful in how we use parables. Maybe we can all agree that we should not base our doctrinal belief systems solely on parables. At the same time, we can acknowledge the fact that parables are rich illustrations of spiritual truths. On this thread it is obvious that we don't all agree on what those truths are. I've got to go teach a class. I'll check this interesting thread later.
     
  17. James_Newman

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    Brothers, if we cannot draw doctrine from parables, we have just eliminated half the words in red. Why do you suppose Jesus spoke in parables, if we are not to draw any doctrine from them? He was just whiling away the hours, telling campfire stories, waiting for some Jews to kill Him? These parables are all teachings about the kingdom. His kingdom, when He returns to reign (lets forgo the preterist arguments please, there is a thread for that one already) LITERALY for 1000 years.

    I don't think the bible supports your theory that parables are not for doctrine, either.

    Mark 4
    2 And he taught them many things by parables, and said unto them in his doctrine,
    3 Hearken; Behold, there went out a sower to sow:

    Matthew 15
    10 And he called the multitude, and said unto them, Hear, and understand:
    11 Not that which goeth into the mouth defileth a man; but that which cometh out of the mouth, this defileth a man.
    15 Then answered Peter and said unto him, Declare unto us this parable.
    16 And Jesus said, Are ye also yet without understanding?
    17 Do not ye yet understand, that whatsoever entereth in at the mouth goeth into the belly, and is cast out into the draught?

    We can see in Numbers that Balak put a lot of stock in Balaam's parables. It seems that they were put in his mouth by God and they came to pass. The spirit of the Lord came on him and he 'took up his parable':
    Numbers 23
    18 And he took up his parable, and said, Rise up, Balak, and hear; hearken unto me, thou son of Zippor:
    19 God is not a man, that he should lie; neither the son of man, that he should repent: hath he said, and shall he not do it? or hath he spoken, and shall he not make it good?

    God wants us to pay attention to His parables. God does not tell stories idly to entertain us.
    Psalm 78
    1 Give ear, O my people, to my law: incline your ears to the words of my mouth.
    2 I will open my mouth in a parable: I will utter dark sayings of old:
    The Lord speaks his law in parables! Surely the warnings given in parables are meant to be heeded.

    Ezekiel 17
    1 And the word of the LORD came unto me, saying,
    2 Son of man, put forth a riddle, and speak a parable unto the house of Israel;

    Ezekiel 20
    48 And all flesh shall see that I the LORD have kindled it: it shall not be quenched.
    49 Then said I, Ah Lord GOD! they say of me, Doth he not speak parables?

    Yes, he doth speak in parables. But the parables were to be heeded as literal warnings. The same holds true for the parables that Jesus spoke.

    These parables do indeed have a doctrinal teaching.

    1Cor 6:9
    9 Know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the kingdom of God? Be not deceived: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor abusers of themselves with mankind,
    10 Nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor extortioners, shall inherit the kingdom of God.
     
  18. DeafPosttrib

    DeafPosttrib
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    Newman,

    I agree with you, all parables are doctrines. No way we can afford to neglect them.

    Christ taught on the kingdom is very important for everyone ought to know, because we all have two choices where we will going right after we died - either heaven or hell, that we shall spend eternality. No one shall escape from it. That why Christ teaching us to consider the eternality things on our souls, that we cannot escape from it.

    Obivously, all parables are important doctrines, no way we can neglect them.

    In Christ
    Rev. 22:20 -Amen!
     
  19. gb93433

    gb93433
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    Jesus addressed the issue of parables in Matthew 13:10-17, And the disciples came and said to Him, "Why do You speak to them in parables?" Jesus answered them, "To you it has been granted to know the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven, but to them it has not been granted. "For whoever has, to him [more] shall be given, and he will have an abundance; but whoever does not have, even what he has shall be taken away from him. "Therefore I speak to them in parables; because while seeing they do not see, and while hearing they do not hear, nor do they understand."In their case the prophecy of Isaiah is being fulfilled, which says, `You will keep on hearing, but will not understand; You will keep on seeing, but will not perceive; For the heart of this people has become dull, With their ears they scarcely hear, And they have closed their eyes, Otherwise they would see with their eyes, Hear with their ears, And understand with their heart and return, And I would heal them.' "But blessed are your eyes, because they see; and your ears, because they hear. "For truly I say to you that many prophets and righteous men desired to see what you see, and did not see it, and to hear what you hear, and did not hear it.
     
  20. av1611jim

    av1611jim
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    gb;
    And this is exactly what we have come here to say.
    Jesus taught TRUTH in the form of parables so that His sheep may understand what He is teaching. Those who are NOT His sheep will be confused. Now, if you claim to be one of His sheep, then you must approach ALL Scripture with a prayerful attitude asking for the opening of your eyes and ears that you may understand. Agreed? If so, then why not here also?
    When I first encountered this teaching, my first thought was NO WAY !
    But then the Gentle Holy Spirit reminded me I ought to never reject out of hand anything from the Scriptures. I ought to pray for understanding.
    For years I have had trouble reconciling the warnings and conditionals with the assurances and unconditionals. Then again, I was reminded that, there are NOT two ways to understand Scripture. God is NOT that way.
    When faced with two schools of thought, there are THREE ways to understand it. As God is three in one. Therefore, if one is true and the other is true, then the TRUTH must be both. In other words;
    Could there be another answer I have not considered?
    Indeed, there is. BOTH sides have 'glommed' onto a PART of the whole.
    The whole, when fully understood, clarifies and reconciles the "warnings and conditionals with the assurances and unconditionals".
    Study with an open mind and heart, praying for and searching for the Lord's will, and I believe, if you are a sheep, you will get it.
    Not ALL of Jesus' teaching are easy to swallow. In fact MOST are completely FOREIGN to us. Your FLESH will rebel at EVERY one of them. But take heart. If you are a sheep, your heart will find peace and safety in Him.
    In His service;
    Jim
     

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