Copyright Question

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by J. Jump, Jan 11, 2007.

  1. J. Jump

    J. Jump
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    Would it be a violation of copyright to produce an audio version of the NASB Bible and give copies of it to folks that wanted copies. The key word being give not sell?
     
  2. EdSutton

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    The NASB probably has something in the first few pages about how much can be reproduced, or for what purpose, if any, one can reproduce it. If not, contact the Lockman Foundation. I'm sure they would give you the details, if one were to ask. :thumbsup:

    Ed
     
  3. Deacon

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    THE LOCKMAN FOUNDATION
    Copyright information:

    Pretty standard stuff there.

    Quoting it in a audio version is allowed under the above stipulations.

    Rob
     
  4. J. Jump

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    Thanks gentlemen.
     
  5. AresMan

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    Copyright clauses such as these are one reason why I prefer the KJV (I use both 1611 and 1769). I prefer not to feel encumbered when I spread God's word. :)
     
  6. EdSutton

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    Let me see if I got this right!

    So it is morally, you understand, OK to ignore ('cause I wouldn't want to be "encumbered") the older copyright laws of the United Kingdom, and the 'English crown', that are BTW, still "on the books", regardless that some in the US, over time got around this by printing their own 'bootlegged' copies of some edition of the A.V.; but it is not morally OK, not to mention the legality issue, to 'violate' the newer copyright laws of the United States, UK, etc., with such as the NIV, NKJV, NASB, and uh - and uh... oh yeah, nevermind that the Darby and/or the ASV, to name two are NOT now limited by any copyright laws and fully in the public domain, and ..uh...?

    And what did I just miss here? :confused:

    Ed

    P.S. Yeah I did just say that!
     
    #6 EdSutton, Jan 13, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 13, 2007
  7. Ed Edwards

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    The first rule of copyright lawsuits (indeed, the first
    law of suing) is:

    Sue someone with money.

    Of course, if you have enough money to reproduce
    sound tapes - you might have enough money to
    sue over.

    It is immoral to take a copyrighted material and
    distribuate (includes giving away) copys of it
    in another format.

    However, those in American have a 200 year history
    of taking the "Authorized Version" logo and puting it
    on their unauthorized Bible they just printed up.


     
  8. Ed Edwards

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    The Pilgims in the USofA used the Geneva Bible.
    The Copyright status the KJVs is not determined
    by discussion here yet so the Copyright status of
    the KJV[]bs[/b] is dubious; by contrast & FOR SURE,
    the Geneva Bible is NOT copyrighted.
     
  9. EdSutton

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    I'd say there is little question that the 1611 edition of the A. V. was 'copywrited'.

    Anywho- Geneva Bible, Darby Translation, ASV.

    Well, that's at least three that are not copywrited, by any means, and I'd almost guess that the Tyndale and Wyclif would be at least a couple more.

    And I'm pretty sure that none of the Hebrew, Chaldee, or Greek manuscripts were ever copyrighted.

    Kinda makes the alleged argument for 'using' (or abusing) the KJV a bit contradictory, wouldn't you think?

    And outta' curiosity, why does anyone have a problem with citing the version, giving credit, or getting permission from the publisher to get approval, in the first place, if the reason is legitimate?

    That, too, "do make one wonder"!

    Ed
     
    #9 EdSutton, Jan 13, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 13, 2007

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