Could you be a pioneer missionary?

Discussion in 'Missions / Witnessing / eVangelism' started by John of Japan, Aug 16, 2006.

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Could you be a pioneer missionary?

  1. I could live in a one room Mongolia ger (yurt) hut with no electricity.

    5 vote(s)
    45.5%
  2. I could eat goat's meat and drink fermented goat's milk while smiling like I loved it!

    5 vote(s)
    45.5%
  3. I could spend five hours a day (five days a week) studying a foreign language.

    6 vote(s)
    54.5%
  4. I could live with carrying water for all my needs from the city well.

    5 vote(s)
    45.5%
  5. I could take not hearing news from loved ones for six months.

    8 vote(s)
    72.7%
  6. I could live with nothing new to read in English for 6 months.

    8 vote(s)
    72.7%
  7. I could live 200 miles away from a doctor.

    6 vote(s)
    54.5%
  8. I could live 200 miles away from a grocery store and shop once a month.

    8 vote(s)
    72.7%
  9. I could live with hearing no English other than from my family.

    9 vote(s)
    81.8%
  10. I could love a people not my own and give my whole life to see them saved.

    9 vote(s)
    81.8%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    The wife and I just got back from a wonderful three days of family camp with all (yes all) of the IFB missionaries on our island of Hokkaido, a missionary wife from Australia, and a lovely missionary couple working in Mongolia! The total number of missionaries and MK's (missionary kids) was about 40, and a great time was had by all--with not one discouraging word or fuss.

    The fellowship was great, but my time with the man working in Mongolia got me thinking about pioneer missions. I am not talking about guys like me who follow in the footsteps of others, but those missionaries who go where no one has gone before, breaking new ground, maybe even having to translate the first Bible into the language. Such missionaries, the first into an area, used to be called "apostles" before the "advanced missiology" of the 20th century. I have an book about John Paton entitled, The Apostle to the New Hebrides.

    I have great admiration for such folk--"there were giants in the earth in those days." So I thought I'd make up a little test for us to see if we could be such a missionary. Good luck!
     
  2. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    How to score yourself.

    0-2 "Yes" answers: Nothing but meat and potato chips plus a TV remote for you. You could never be a pioneer missionary. If you pray for pioneer missionaries, make sure you don't learn too much about their work. You'd get scared and hide in your closet! :laugh:

    3-4 "Yes" answers: You need to get out more! Try visiting the local zoo. You couldn't be a pioneer missionary, but you might be able to support one with prayer and money. :praying:

    5-6 "Yes" answers: Don't call the mission board--they'll call you. You could be a home missionary, but might not be able to cross cultures. :smilewinkgrin:

    7-8 "Yes" answers: Admit it, you carry your own pair of chopsticks! Visit a foreign field and try the food. You have great possibilities!

    9-10 "Yes" answers: Do not pass go, do not collect $200 in support, you could live off the land. Head out for a primitive field right now! :thumbs:
     
  3. Mexdeaf

    Mexdeaf
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    I scored 4 and I 'are' a missionary!

    Don't know how bad goat's milk is but I have had some wierd stuff to eat down here in MX. I have finally gotten over asking what it is, now I just chew, swallow and PRAY!
     
  4. Squire Robertsson

    Squire Robertsson
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    For a Californian (like myself), Mexico (at least parts like Sonora and Nuevo Laredo) is almost a home mission field.
     
  5. Baptist_Pastor/Theologian

    Baptist_Pastor/Theologian
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    Not my calling but it's my expressed intent to preach to those in my church as if it may be their calling. I hope to have a 100 missionaries go out under my ministry. My prayers are with you in your missionary work.:applause: Thanks for the report.
     
  6. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    :laugh: :laugh:
    I've eaten many UFO's (Unidentified Frying Objects) in my day, Mexdeaf!

    Remember the missionary motto: Where He leads me I will follow, what He feeds me I will swallow.
     
  7. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    I take it you're talking a few cultural steps beyond Taco Bell, Squire!:thumbs:
     
  8. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    Thank you for the prayers and participation.

    You have a wonderful vision for the Lord and His evangelization of the world. Make sure you send a lot of those missionaries out here to Asia. :thumbs:
     
  9. Su Wei

    Su Wei
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    Thanks for this little test that got me thinking....I know what it takes to be a Pioneer Missionary!

    All of Christ. None of Self.

    :flower:
     
  10. El_Guero

    El_Guero
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    Weird in Mexico? Takes all types.

     
  11. El_Guero

    El_Guero
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    OK:

    Can you eat raw fish?

    Can you eat menudo?

    How about cesos?

    Come on now!

    Goat's milk is just plain odd . . . and makes ya' stink kinda funny. Sashimi separates the missionaries from the infidels . . .

    ;)

     
  12. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    Well put, Su Wei. Thanks for participating.
     
  13. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    Thanks for participating, El_Guero.

    I swore when we came to Japan that I would never eat raw egg. I figured I could handle the raw fish, octopus and similar delicacies, but forget that raw egg! :eek: However, I underestimated Japanese cuisine.

    One day coming home from language school during that first year I thought I'd get a bowl of soba (buckwheat) noodles in a little shop in the eki (train station). I saw the Chinese characters for "egg soba," which I had just learned, and I thought it sounded good. So I ordered it. The noodle cook poured the soup in the bowl, added the noodles, got a boiled egg (or so I thought), and cracked it right into the bowl. So I had my first taste of raw egg, and it wasn't too bad after I mixed it in well! :tongue3:
     
  14. Su Wei

    Su Wei
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    bro John, I actually couldn't take the poll coz i was brutally honest with myself and i could tick even a single box. :tear:
    But i protest.... 0-2 ticks should read never say never....God is an amazing God.

    And that's why i say, to be a pioneer missionary, you really have to be God sent...

    Hmmmnnn I actually grew up on less than semi boiled egg with soy sauce (for breakfast). Yum. And I know the cracking the egg in last minute before serving a hot bowl of noodles. We do that too.

    I can handle sashimi. I love sushi. I love seaweed. Wasabi is just for kicks.

    Never tried goat's milk though.

    But anyway, culture shock 101 really should feature prominently in missionary training school, huh.
     
    #14 Su Wei, Aug 17, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 17, 2006
  15. Squire Robertsson

    Squire Robertsson
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    If the broth was hot enough, the stirred up egg should have cooked to a soft boil or scramble. Which would not have been so bad. But then I don't do eggs other than scrambled unless a soul is involved.
     
  16. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    Actually, it ends up a little bit cooked, but not really a soft boil unless you wait long enough--which you don't do 'cause you're hungry!

    My wife and I don't do raw eggs anymore after getting food poisoning from sukiyaki. For those who don't know, in this dish you cook thinly sliced beef in a communal pot and then dip it in raw egg. Delicious, with or without the egg!
     
  17. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    Thanks for your brutal honesty, Su Wei. You may be short changing yourself here! You don't sound like you would have culture shock with the food in most places! Maybe it would be hard to eat that "baloot" egg in the Phillipines that they bury in the ground for awhile, though. As for me, I don't touch natto, a sticky dish made from fermented beans. :eek:

    As you point out, if God sends you, He gives you the ability to handle these things. The whole key is in the Great Commission in Matthew, where He promises, "Lo, I am with you alway, even to the end of the world."

    Someone once asked David Livingstone, the great pioneer missionary to Africa, how he could go back to the field where he had been attacked by a lion, seen his health ravaged by malaria, and seen many other dangers in his travels for the Lord. He answered, "I have the word of a Perfect Gentlemen, who said, 'Lo, I am with you always.'"

    Livingstone eventually died on his knees in a mud hut in Africa, ministering to the black Africans he loved so much. It is said that the Africans in turn loved Livingstone so much that his heart was buried in Africa, though his body was sent back to England.
     
  18. El_Guero

    El_Guero
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    Wasn't it Livingstone that eventually died long after his family had died?

    ;)
     
  19. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    His wife died after a brief illness with him in Africa in 1861. He died on April 29, 1873. He was survived by several children living back in Scotland.

    I remember reading somewhere that his brother had refused God's call, instead wanting to become rich and famous. The brother stood in the shadows at a great celebration of David's life back in England after David's death. Livingstone became known not only as a missionary, but as a pioneer explorer who searched for the source of the Nile for the purpose of blazing a path for the Gospel.

    It was in 1871 that journalist Henry Stanley caught up with Livingstone in that famous incident where he said, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?" (Well, duh, who else are you going to find that is white in the heart of Africa in 1871! :laugh: ) I have read that after living in the same tent with Livingstone and seeing his godly life, Stanley became a Christian even though Livingstone never directly witnessed to him with words.

    It is not uncommon for pioneer missionaries to lose family members. Adoniram Judson, the Apostle to Burma, outlasted two wives and buried several kids on the field. In his biography by his son, it tells how he sat by his wife's grave for days in total depression, imagining himself in a grave also, before the comfort of the Lord filled his soul.

    Even today there is danger on pioneer fields. I noticed that one of the least desirable conditions in my poll was being 200 miles from a doctor. The wife of my friend from Mongolia had her first child the Mongolian way (she is a lovely Mongolian believer), with three midwives pushing on her tummy to force the baby out! :eek: It almost killed her! Her husband says he'll deliver the next one himself rather than have that--and by the way she is pregnant!
     
  20. El_Guero

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    Just a few of the martyrs . . .

     

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