Documents show post-war CIA covered up Nazi war crimes

Discussion in '2006 Archive' started by poncho, Jun 6, 2006.

  1. poncho

    poncho
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    By Shmuel Rosner, Haaretz Correspondent

    The United States was aware that West Germany held information on the whereabouts of Adolf Eichmann in the 1950s, but chose to keep the matter secret, fearing that the arrest of the Nazi fugitive might lead to
    embarrassing revelations about links between senior German officials and other Nazis.

    This information, as well as the pressure that West Germany applied on the Central Intelligence Agency in order to prevent the leak of this sensitive information, is detailed in hundreds of newly declassified documents released by the U.S. government Tuesday.

    The government released a total of 27,000 CIA documents related to Nazi war crimes during World War II on Tuesday morning. The documents include information on the employment of Nazi war criminals by the American intelligence agency.

    The documents were declassified as part of an interagency effort to release material related to Japanese and German war criminals during World War II. Since the work commenced in 1999, more than eight million documents have been released.

    <snip>

    The documents also reveal that the CIA, in response to a West German request, asked Life Magazine, which planned to publish Eichmann's memoirs in 1960, to delete any mention of Globke from them.

    Eichmann had been arrested by Mossad agents earlier that year, and his family sold his memoirs to the magazine to pay for his legal defense.

    Allen Dulles, then head of the CIA, wrote in September 1960 to his counterpart in West Germany assuring him that a "minor" mention of Globke in the memoirs would be deleted, pursuant to the CIA's request.

    SOURCE

    Can't have any "embarrassing revelations" now can we?


     

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