Dr. Alveda king on baltimore riots: Mlk jr. Would ‘be heartbroken’

Discussion in 'News / Current Events' started by Revmitchell, Apr 28, 2015.

  1. Revmitchell

    Revmitchell
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    In an exclusive interview with Breitbart News, Dr. Alveda King, niece of the great civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., said if he saw these Baltimore riots, “he’d be heartbroken, I am.”

    High school students stormed the street in protests and riots Monday afternoon, throwing rocks at police officers.

    The protests come on the same day as Freddie Gray’s funeral. He died earlier this month while in police custody.

    “As I watched the protest, I’m reminded of several years ago… I was part of the first children’s march in Birmingham, Alabama,” King told Breitbart News. She added that those protests were peaceful and supervised.

    “These children are not supervised—they are angry,” she said.

    King said that she is very concerned that the Mayor of Baltimore has appeared to give these people an opportunity to destroy.

    King went on to say when she sees the children on television running into a CVS and stealing—and police not doing anything because they have been told not to—that it’s not giving these children any compassion at all.

    “That’s discouraging,” King stated.

    She recalled what her father said to a group of people when their family home was burned in Birmingham, Alabama. She said he stood on a car and said, “Don’t riot, don’t destroy, go home”—“Go home and pray.”

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-govern...-baltimore-riots-mlk-jr-would-be-heartbroken/
     
  2. Zaac

    Zaac
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    In 1966, for example, in a Sept. 27 interview, King was questioned by CBS’ Mike Wallace about the “increasingly vocal minority” who disagreed with his devotion to non-violence as a tactic. In that interview, King admitted there was such a minority, though he said that surveys had shown most black Americans were on his side. “And I contend that the cry of ‘black power’ is, at bottom, a reaction to the reluctance of white power to make the kind of changes necessary to make justice a reality for the Negro,” King said. “I think that we’ve got to see that a riot is the language of the unheard. And, what is it that America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the economic plight of the Negro poor has worsened over the last few years.”
     

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