Easter vs. Passover

Discussion in '2003 Archive' started by time like this, Apr 15, 2003.

  1. time like this

    time like this
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    On the calender this year the Jewish Passover is April 17th a Thurs. and it falls on different days of the week every year. How is it that Easter always falls on Sun. and is not refered to as the Passover. who is right? and who changed the dates?
     
  2. donnA

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    Since they are not the samething then no one is wrong on the dates.
    Eater is on the first Sunday after the first full moon after the veranl equinox(first day of spring).
    It looks something like this,
    vernal equinox(first day of spring)
    next full moon after that,
    fisrt Sunday after the full moon
    Easter sunday always falls between March 22, and April 25, if the full moon is on a Sunday the Easter is the next Sunday.
    Easter was celebrated on different days of the week until 325ad, when it was decided(by teh Council of Necaea) it would be celebrated on Sundays(probably becasue Jesus rose on teh first day of the week, Sunday on our calendar).
    Passover was never on the same day each year either, their months had different number of days from one year to another. Passover is begins on the 15th. day of the month Nisan, and is 7 days long.
    You can read more information about them here.


    More information on the jewish calender can be found here.
    http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0857115.html
     
  3. rsr

    rsr
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    "Easter" and "Passover" in the New Testament are exactly the same thing.

    "Easter," a much later coinage, is used only once in the KJV; it is not found at all in most modern versions. (I haven't checked them all, but it does not exist in the NIV, NASB or ESV, for example.)

    Much ink and many electrons have been spilled on the matter of why the KJV translators picked "Easter" one and one time only to translate the same word rendered elsewhere as "Passover."

    The decision to abandon the Jewish method of calculating the Pascha (the Greek term) was rooted both in variability of calendars throughout the empire and (IMO) the desire of ecclesiastical authorities to once and for all separate Christianity and Judaism.
     
  4. time like this

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    Kate B 007

    I agree with you that it iwas the council of nicea headed by Constantine and the bishops of Asia Minor. At this council meeting was it not ordered by constantine that all should abandon the jewish passover celebration even though it was practiced by the churches in asia minor as handed down by the apostle john. was it polycarp or polycrates that was killed for keeping the jewish passover. could the council of nicea been in era? and if so is it important to correct a mistake? i beleive the passover to be very preciuos thing it reminds us of his sacricrifice as the only true Christ.
     
  5. Caretaker

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    It was Rome which sought to separate the death, burial and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ, from the celebration of Passover. Jesus Messiah, Yeshua HaMesheach(Heb.), is our Passover Lamb, and I wonder if believers should not consider returning to a joint celebration of Passover and the fulfillment in Calvary.

    Easter seems to have a strong link to paganism, and the worship of Ishtar, with the celebration of Lent having no basis in the Word of God, and strong ties to spring rite observances in paganism.

    The apostasy of Roman Catholicism, in accommodating pagan festivals is well documented, and it might be of value to reexamine the extent of the believer's participation in certain "Christian" holidays, ie. Easter and Christmas.

    May God bless.

    A servant of Christ,
    Drew
     
  6. donnA

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    I can agree that Easter and Passover are closely tied together, but they are not the samething. Passover being a jewish holiday, and Easter(resurection day)being a hoilday no jew would celebrate, it is distinctly christian.
     
  7. Mark Osgatharp

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    Here is the low-down on "Easter."

    The term "Easter" was simply the old English word for "passover" as was the term "Oester" in German. The earlier German and English translations used these terms even in the Old Testament.

    The term "passover" was actually coined by one of the English translators (I think it was Coverdale but I don't remember for sure) so as to have a more appropriate English term for the passover.

    In the European languages, other than English and German, the term for Easter is the same as the term for passover. All the speculation about the the etymological origin of the term "Easter" aside, the fact remains that by "Easter" nothing other than "passover" was ever intended - whether the passover of the Jews or the passover of Judaized "Christianity."

    Anyone who has access to an Oxford English Dictionary (which can be found in many public libraries) should look up the term "Easter." It is very enlightening.

    Mark Osgatharp
     
  8. Dr. Bob

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    In older English (like that preceding the AV1611) the terms Easter and Passover were often used interchangeably. Leads to much confusion, you might imagine.

    They are, of course, very different. And yet linked.
    What feast are we to celebrate? Passover, with Christ at its focus.

    We will do that this Friday evening (presenting Christ in the Passover), although my candles are lit in my home right now.
     
  9. wopik

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    How is it that Easter always falls on Sun.

    "...and besides all this, today is the third day since these things were done" (Lk. 24:21). "These things were done" included the sealing of the sepulchre and setting a watch at the tomb -- ordered by Pilate, a day after the crucifixion (Matt. 27: 62-66).

    Sunday was the third day from Thursday, making a late Wednesday crucifixion possible.

    http://www.centuryone.com/crucifixion.html
     
  10. rlvaughn

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    A third option would be the New Testament celebration of the Lord's supper on the first day of the week, rather than return to the Jewish passover or follow the traditional Christian Easter celebration.
     
  11. Tim

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    Quote from rlvaughn:"A third option would be the New Testament celebration of the Lord's supper on the first day of the week, rather than return to the Jewish passover or follow the traditional Christian Easter celebration."

    Exactly right!

    Passover is the celebration feast of Old Testament Israel's release from physical bondage to Egypt. It looked forward typologically to Christ. At the last Passover supper with His disciples, Christ initiated the feast of the New Testament-which we know as the Lord's supper. It celebrates the release of spiritual Israel from bondage to sin. Christ fulfilled the Passover and asked us to remember His sacrifice by partaking of the Lord's Supper.

    A believer in the better covenant,

    Tim
     
  12. time like this

    time like this
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    Caretaker
    I agree with you about the ishtar/easter. is anyone familiar with the history of ishtar as it relates to ashoroth in the O.T. solomon built temples for her, and isreal worshiped her son tammuz. who was the o.t. false christ. it is recorded that the queen of heaven(asharoth/ishtar) son suffered a fatal wound and she had the people mour or lament for 40 days;practice lent. on the 40th day he was resurected. constantine practiced this ritual at the same time he professed to be christian. this was paret of sun god worship. this is why he had the bishops to abandon the apostolic teaching of keeping the passover. that mixed with a dislike for Jews. So it is true easter and passover are different. but since we as gentiles were brought into the promise should we not follow the pattern of our messianic brothers who came to us with the gospel.

    p.s.
    anyone have any historical accounts on these thoughts
     
  13. rsr

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    I have seen the (copious) Internet references to Ishtar but am unconvinced. Easter is derived from Teutonic mythology, not Semitic. And, according to the OED, there is hardly a trace to determine anything about the Teutonic goddess, other than that the name has stuck in those languages.

    Happy Thor's Day.
     

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