FAFSA and the GI Bill? help please.

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by Koontzy, Feb 18, 2008.

  1. Koontzy

    Koontzy
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    I am currently recieving the GI bill for the secular college I am attending... I got accepted at Luther rice, and hope to start classes this summer.... I am filing out the Fafsa and one question asks me about recieving VA education benefits, and i think thats the GI BIll... it ask how much and for how long....

    right now I recieve 1101 per month for full time, but I dont know if thats what I will et while attending Luther Rice...

    do I have to put it on there? if so will it hurt FAFSA from paying for my college? cause right now I get overage checks each semester......

    should I skip the VA question or put no? what do you think?

    I dont want it to hurt how much i get....

    thanks
     
  2. annsni

    annsni
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    I wish I could help you!! We filled out the FAFSA for my daughter and choked when I saw what they think we can afford to pay for her college. I guess I need to sell the house and move in with the ILs to afford that!

    Can you call the financial aid office at your college to find out what they say? That might help.
     
  3. Siberian

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    You better call the financial aid office.
     
  4. StefanM

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    All of your answers affect your potential aid. However, you should definitely call your financial aid office.

    To list inaccurate information intentionally is a crime.
     
  5. Koontzy

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    well I decided to put it on there, and Luther Rice has a financial aid estimater, and it says with the EFC code that FAFSA gave me..... that I will recieve around 11,400 annually..... so its all good....
     
  6. gb93433

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    I remember those days when they told me how much my parents could afford to pay. However my parents made me pay for my own. So the next year I skipped having my parents filing it out and I received more financial aid.
     
  7. StefanM

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    I don't know if the law has changed or not, but doing that is not allowed at present.

    If you are an unmarried undergraduate student without children, you have to list your parent's income, even if they don't support you one penny. It's grossly unfair. I had a friend in college who got absolutely nothing from his parents. He couldn't even get a tax return from his dad to fill out an application for a scholarship that he would have received automatically based on needs and grades.

    He had to hop from place to place over the breaks, but the federal government treated him like any old kid who got to go home for the holidays and got support from his family.

    It's ridiculous.
     
  8. gb93433

    gb93433
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    It was no different in 1970 than now. I would think that you could if your parents do not support you and you are an adult. When I was 18 I had a job and provided an income tax form.

    The problem has arisen from students using their financial aid to buy a home, etc.

    You must also rememebr that colleges and universities have been using funds dedicated for academics and funding athletics.

    In almost every college and university there are no full rides. The best scholarship is tuition only.

    I have been in favor of abandoning all athletics in colleges and universities and putting them in the communities like they do in Europe. Ity is common knowledge that too often an athlete's grades are changes just so the athlete can continue to do their sport. Right now there is a push by athletics at the professional level to want starting athletes to have at least two years at the college level.

    A documentary on TV reported last month that intercollegiate athletics spent $5 billion and took in $4 billion.

    Take a look at
    http://www.uni.edu/unitedfaculty/posted_documents/Intercollegiate Athletics.pdf
     
  9. StefanM

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    http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/fotw0809/help/fftoc02k.htm

    Unless you are born before a certain date, if you are a non-veteran, unmarried, without dependents, and pursuing undergraduate studies, then you are considered a dependent, unless both of your parents are deceased.

    One may not be a dependent for tax purposes while being a dependent for financial aid purposes.
     
  10. gb93433

    gb93433
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    They had the same requirements when I was a student and in my Freshman year my parents did not fill it out. I was working and going to school. I did not work on campus. Because I was not receiving any help from home my parents could not claim me on their taxes.

    Just rememeber how much of your money goes to athletics and "increased research" among faculty. Many professors in the largest state universities only teach one class per year and the rest of the trime is spent on "research". They only have to be at the institution for their classes and office hours. Other universities which are not a primary research institution have faulty members whop teach nine hours per semester. That amounts to 6 classes per year. I know one professor who has written 29 articles from his dissertation and teaches one class per year. Many of the articles he has written were translated into other languages. Years ago professors taught between 12 and 15 hoiurs per semester and had office hours. Research was an extra. Very few books are written by professors today because of the article requirement by universities.

    That is where your tax money is going.
     
  11. annsni

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    I have the Guide to Federal Student Aid in front of me and it says:

    Dependency Status
    For the 2007-2008 academic year, you're an independent student IF atleast one of the following applies to you:

    * You were born before 1/1/84
    * You are or will be enrolled in a master's or doctoral degree program (beyond a bachelor's degree) at the beginning of th 2007-2008 academic year.
    * You're married on the day you apply (even if you are separated but not divorced).
    * You have children who receive more than half their support from you.
    * You have dependents (other than your children or spouse) who live with you and who receive more than half their support from you at the time you apply and through June 30, 2008.
    * Both your parents are deceased, or you are (or were until age 18) a ward or dependent of the court.
    * You are currently serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces for purposes other than training.
    * You're a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces.

    If none of these criteria apply to you, you're a dependent student.


    Not living with parents or not being claimed by them on tax forms does not determine dependency status for federal aid.



    So you cannot just ignore your parent's income if it's going to negatively affect you or if they're not contributing.
     
  12. gb93433

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    If you stop at the first no thern you will never get far in life. In just about everything I have accomplished there have been those on the sidelines telling me it could not be done. Every time I proved them wrong. The I will is far more important then the IQ.

    All I know is that when I was a student they told me that I needed to have my parents fill out the form and I told them my dilemma and I did not have my parents fill out anything. So it worked for me.

    The person who stops at the first roadblock is one who gives up too easily. One who gets discouraged that easily needs to learn a few lessons and get tougher. My philosophy is to give people a resason to say, "No." Most of the time people say, "Yes."

    When I managed a large business and was able to get things done. I obtained deals with companies simply because I asked. I grew that company 220% in the first year. It had been dying for the previous five years.
     
  13. annsni

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    You are correct in that there IS a way to get around it - IF you're willing to make an appointment, meet with someone and have proof that your parents are not at all supporting you and will not support you.

    The book says:

    In unusual cases:

    * An aid administrator can determine that a student who doesn't meet the above criteria should still be treated as an independent student.
    * The financial aid administrator can change your dependency status from dependent to independent based on adequate documentation of your special circumstances.
    * You must provide this documentation.
    * The financial aid administrator cannot automatically change your status simply because you request it.
    * The decision is based on the financial aid administrator's judgment of the facts of your situation and it's final.
    * You cannot appeal that decision to us. (Department of Education/Student Aid)
     
  14. gb93433

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    That is what I did when I went to the financial aid office at the college I was attending.

    Glad to notice that you found the proof because I was not aware of where to find it.
     
  15. annsni

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    Yep - So the issue is that you MUST file with your parent's info unless you fall into those circumstances that are outlined by the government as being an independent student. But then you can appeal with your special circumstances and they may agree with you and allow you to file as an independent student. So the decision is theirs, not the student's.
     

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