False Collection Attempts

Discussion in 'Money Talk$' started by Gina B, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. Gina B

    Gina B
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    I've had this happen THREE times now in a relatively short time span. I received a letter stating I owed money to such and such place and this was an attempt to collect the debt.

    All three were from the same collection agency and for bills from places I did have accounts with in the past but had paid off. However, I assumed I had made a mistake and when the first letter came I called immediately to pay it off with my bank card but never ended up giving them the card number because they suddenly decided I owed a few hundred more in service fees and finance charges.

    I'm SO glad I didn't because I got suspicious and contacted the original creditors. All three confirmed to me that I owed them nothing and offered on their own to contact the collection agency to tell them that.

    I'm passing this on because there are probably others out there that are like me and would just get scared and want to pay them right away, especially if they threaten legal action. (and the one letter did)

    Be careful with your money. I felt so dumb later thinking of how I panicked and called them ready to hand over money just because I thought I was stupid and forgetful and they must be right because how else would they even know I did business with those places...
     
  2. Salty

    Salty
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    Gina,

    Don't be telling folks I sent you those letters!:smilewinkgrin:

    Seriously, these are pros at what they do.

    Elderly folks are often an easy target, as well as military wives whose husbands are deployed in a combat zone.


    Do you remember them movie Paper Moon with Ryan and Tatum O'Neil. They scammed widows into buying a Bible with their name in gold on the front. The widow was told their husband had ordered 3 months previously - when actually the duo simply found the names in the obits the day before.

    There are all kinds of scams out there. Remember, if its too good to be true, it probably isn't

    Here are some things good links (send me 9.95 for each link you click on:laugh:)

    Who's calling

    Put calls on hold

    FBI- Common scams

    The latest scam

    and never give out any personal info - such as birthday, SSAN, credit card numbers.

    and when it comes to your SSAN, don't even give them the first three digits - as that may give the caller your general birthplace.

    Its very possible that the first three of your SSAN generally correspond to the first three of your Zip code

    As I mentioned before, these guys* are pros and every bit of info will help them. The navy has a saying "Loose lips sink ships"

    * and don't think that the pros would not use a lady to sweet talk a guy.... (no, it didn't happen to me)
     
  3. menageriekeeper

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    I simply never pay collection agencies unless they can prove the debt in writing. Merely sending me a letter claiming I owe them money won't actually get me to pay. Calling me on the phone harassing me over a so called debt will get them first laughed at, second quoted the statue of limitations on old debts for my state and if they haven't hung up by then, I'll tell them that the Fair Debt Collection Act prevents them from calling to harass me about a debt they haven't proven I owe and I want their address so I can write to tell them to not contact me by phone again. :D

    Usually, laughing does the trick. Works sometimes for telemarketers too. :laugh:
     
  4. mcdirector

    mcdirector
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    I've gotten several letters from "Bank of America" telling me if I didn't provide my SSN immediately the would cancel my account. Funny thing was that my account number was no where on the letters nor were there any contact numbers. There was a form called a W9 requesting name, rank and serial number. I pulled out my card and called BOA and ended up spending quite a bit of time on the phone with them and several departments all of which were very interested in this little scam. I ended up faxing all the paperwork to them only to get another batch in a few days. The logo was very good.
     
  5. rbell

    rbell
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    Glad you self-corrected before getting into hot water. Some suggestions for ya (you probably know most/all of this...but if nothing else, it's a public service kind of announcement):

    • NEVER reply to these folks without checking things out. If I get an email from anyone that is/was a creditor, I don't respond. Instead, I send out a new email (spammers/scammers gotten pretty clever at disguising themselves).
    • If I ever do get fraudulent stuff/phishing/etc., I forward the attempt to the fraud division of said entity being impersonated. Pretty much every pivate entities have an email to report fraud (it's usually "[email protected]").
    • Also, many state Attorneys General will have a way to report identity crimes. My experience is that most of these folks (private AND public) are very appreciative of folks being on the lookout, and turning in lowlifes.
    Gina...being this kind of happened suddenly, keep your eyes open. Often times, your name/email/phone will have been "discovered" by someone, and there can be an uptick in attempts by these goons. (For instance, if I get one "Bank of America" phishing attempt, I can usually count on getting 2-3 in a short while.) But...if you see a serious increase in this stuff, or if it comes from several different sources, you might want to make sure you haven't had any information compromised. Not trying to be alarmist, but just offering some tips.

    Hope it all works out & that it ends up being little more than an inconvenience. It bears repeating: Never give out private info unsolicited, or over phone/email...unless you've initiated the call. I suggest always calling back (after checking to make sure of the right contact information using "official" numbers & addresses--not ones they give you. And if you suspect an attempt at fraud, take the extra 2 minutes & tell on them. It's worth it!

    Or, you CAN do what I often do...I just give them Salty's SSN and info. It's amazing how appreciative they are! :eek: :saint:

    DISCLAIMER: for those whose sense of humor isn't fully developed, the above is known as a "joke." I can't give out Salty's SSN. You see, Salty's on up there in years. He's so old, his SSN is "Twelve." Most telemarketers don't know what do do with all the extra unused digits... :tonofbricks:So they usually hang up on me. Heck, it takes me 4-5 extra attempts for me to get them to answer my call, and take the rest of his personal information! :D
     
    #5 rbell, Feb 27, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2011
  6. Salty

    Salty
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    Actually, my SSAN is "L" the 12th letter of the alphabet! :smilewinkgrin:, and I can prove it, it is on my Military Discharge from the Spanish-American War, just like Padres!
     
  7. Gina B

    Gina B
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    I'll keep the "give 'em Salty's info" thing in mind. LOL!

    I didn't think anyone would even bother trying with me. It's not like I have much, but I do believe one main incident triggered this, like a chain reaction. That incident was that a few years ago, I joined E-bay and gave them my information, which included a link for bank transactions. That is normal. You can't buy and sell without a bank account!
    However, I never ended up using E-bay, but the account was still there. Someone hacked it in 09 and used it to find what I used to pay for stuff online, then hacked that and sent themselves cash from me to their account.

    I've gotta wonder if they have some type of networking thing where once they take advantage of you, it's about as hard to get off their "not worth scamming" list as it is to get onto the "do not call list" with telemarketers.
     

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