fastest pitcher today/all time?

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Dustin, Mar 22, 2006.

  1. Dustin

    Dustin
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    I've heard that Nolan Ryan has the fastest official pitch timed at 100.9 mph. It's in the Guiness Book of Records. Bob Feller has said that he was timed at over 100 mph many times, I think 105 or 108? There have been many other pitchers that are thought to have hit the 100mph mark. Legend has it that a minor league lefty pitcher in the Balitmore Orioles organization in the late 50's named Steve Dalkowski had a fastball that was close to 110mph, but sadly he couldn't keep it in a batting cage. He was a drunk and was slightly mentally handicapped and he ended up injuring his arm the day he got fitted for his Major League uniform and was never the same after that. He never made it to the Majors. I don't know who's the fastest today, but I'd guess a guy like Billy Wagner or Bobby Jenks from the White Sox. What do you think?
     
  2. Scott J

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    Hard to say about today. It seems that they don't throw as hard as they used to. Alot more emphasis on movement and location.

    JR Richard who pitched with Ryan at Houston could bring it.

    I'd read about Dalkowski before as well. I seem to recall that he didn't fit the proto-type for flame throwers. Correct me if I'm wrong but I seem to remember him being something like 5'9", 165... or something like that.

    If you could ever get what he had in a 6'4" frame... we might see 115-120 mph fastballs and every pitch over 100... and a rules change since there probably isn't a man alive that could touch a 120 mph fastball.
     
  3. Dustin

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    Dalkowski was a little guy, yeah. I doubt he was always throwing 110, but I guess he would average out right around 98-100 mph, realistically. JR Richard was really tall, like 6'7" I think. I agree with you about rule change but he'd have to be able to throw it over the plate first. Could you imagine getting plunked by a 110 mph fastball? I think Dalkowski once led his league in walks strikeouts wild pitches and hit batters, oh yeah, and pitches thrown. Ted Williams batted against him once in a batting cage and couldn't do more than foul tip the few he could catch up with. Dalkowski is an enigma to me. Just one more thing I can't understand. heh heh

    Dustin
     
  4. John Ellwood Taylor

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  5. Dustin

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    I'm a Braves fan, it'd have been neat to see Warren Spahn pitch against Marichal or Drysdale or Koufax. And speaking of that link I forgot about the old Braves closer Mark Wohlers, when he COULD throw it over the plate he could burn it in there.
     
  6. EdSutton

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    I once read that Steve Dalkowski was timed at 94 one time at the US military's Aberdeen Proving Grounds. It was considered a somewhat suspect reading as to his true speed. He pitched a complete game the day before, so they figured his arm was tired. He pitched from flat ground, not a mound. He'd thrown for a solid half hour, and was exhausted, before getting one in the area where the machine would read it. It was assumed that the above had taken at least 15 Mph, from his best speed. Some old-time baseball men said that he was the fastest of all time, and could throw so hard, that he could throw a low rising fast ball, the only one anyone claimed could do so. That he could start a pitch out with it heading for the batter's knees and have it rise to his belt, by the time it crossed the plate. Bob Feller was once timed at 104 mph, supposedly. To me, overall, guys like Nolan Ryan, Steve Carlton, Randy Johnson and Roger Clemens, have to be considered, all throwing in the high 90(s) well into their 40(s). I saw a Roger Clemens pitch, in the last two years, and I actually believe it was last year, timed at 98. Softball trick pitcher and showman, Eddie Feiner was supposedly able to pitch a softball at 100 mph, as well. That's my guesses, anyway.
    Ed
     
  7. Dustin

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    Yeah, Tom House, one of Ryan's fromer pitching coaches once said that some will throw harder than Nolan Ryan, but nobody would throw harder for as long as he did.
     
  8. Scott J

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    More than being a great player... I found myself attracted to Nolan Ryan the person. He never seemed to brag or act proud. He never seemed to seek the limelight but rather appeared to shun it. Yet, the personal testimonies of those who knew him closely are pretty uniform in saying what a great person he is.

    One would have to wonder if he would have been nearly the pitcher he was if he wasn't the man that he is.

    The best athletes I knew coming up... usually ended up failures. They became proud and couldn't handle success or failure. One kid threw over 90 in high school- but was all but uncoachable. Another guy rushed for over 400 yards in one game and was a terrific baseball player (hit a HR against me on a pitch that would've been in the dirt had he not hit it)... but refused to do school work and eventually washed out with the Cubs farm system.

    Still another guy was one of the best running backs you never heard of. He was a white kid from western NC. (In an area that produced Heath Shuler and Carl Pickens, anyone who saw all 3 play would tell you this guy was much better than either of them). He was only 5'10"- 185... but bench pressed over 400 lbs, could cut on a dime, and ran a sub-4.4 forty... without working out. It was all natural. His college coaches did everything they could to get him by. He didn't even have to do the manditory weight lifting... but one day he just decided it was completely unreasonable for them to expect him to go to class and quit.

    Nolan Ryan is a rare commodity. A guy incredibly gifted... who didn't lose perspective.
     
  9. Alcott

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    Walter Johnson, who played 1907-1927, reportedly won his 416 games (2nd only to Cy Young) and 113 shutouts by having 2 pitches; "a fast ball, and a faster ball." This was long before radar guns, of course, but I remember a story that an attempt was made to time his fast ball (or maybe his faster ball) by using a motorcycle sped up to a certain mph speed, and he timed his windup to release the ball just as the bike went by him. I don't remember what speed they came up with, but that story is probably available from somewhere.

    But would the fastest speed, however it is determined, really be more important than the results of using such a fastball, perhaps in conjunction with other pitches if a fireballer has another good one? Sandy Koufax reportedly spent 6 major league seasons trying to get his fastball under control, then 6 more being the most dominant pitcher in the game. By starting at that level at age 18 it's little wonder he didn't last past 30 years of age.

    An even worse case could be David Clyde. You might have to be over 40 to remember him, but he was the best high school pitcher in the nation, with many ho-hitters and strikeout records, in the early 70's. The Texas Rangers, just having moved from Washington D.C. to Arlington, TX, and clearly still the worst team with the worst attendance in the majors, drafted him first, just out high school at age 18, and immediately prepared him to start a game for them in June, 1973. They did get their first sellout and he actually won the game, striking out 8 in 5 innings (?). He started a few more games but was not effective, and then quickly developed severe arm problems which caused him to lose all ability. A great fastball isn't worth much if the pitcher is ruined like that.

    There have been attempts to make football players (receivers; kick returners) out of pure track stars, and most are unsuccessful-- usually they are not good at catching the ball and/or the vicious hitting in football makes them timid. Baseball pitching is comparable in a way; pure speed is only part of it. A pitcher still has to have control, endurance, fielding ability, and must study the game and the players.
     
  10. Dustin

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    David Clyde's ML debut pitching line:

    Minnesota 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 – 3 4 0
    Texas 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 x – 4 11 2

    Minnesota Twins IP H R ER BB SO
    Kaat L (8-6) 3.2 8 4 4 3 2
    Goltz 4.1 3 0 0 1 3
    Totals 8.0 11 4 4 4 5

    Texas Rangers IP H R ER BB SO
    Clyde W (1-0) 5.0 1 2 2 7 8
    Gogolewski SV (6) 4.0 3 1 0 2 2
    Totals 9.0 4 3 2 9 10

    from www.baseball-almanac.com


    Seems like those games kids used to pitch in little league, they'd strike everybody out once, and walk them twice. [​IMG]
     
  11. Ps104_33

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    Here is the "100 mph club



    Mark Wohlers
    103.0 mph
    1995
    Spring Training

    Armando Benitez
    102.0 mph
    2002
    Shea Stadium

    Bobby Jenks
    102.0 mph
    08-27-2005
    Safeco Field

    Randy Johnson
    102.0 mph
    07-09-2004
    Pacific Bell Park

    Robb Nen
    102.0 mph
    10-23-1997
    Jacobs Field

    A.J. Burnett
    101.0 mph
    05-31-2005
    PNC Park

    Rob Dibble
    101.0 mph
    1992
    Candlestick Park

    Kyle Farnsworth
    101.0 mph
    05-26-2004
    Minute Maid Park

    Eric Gagne
    101.0 mph
    04-16-2004
    Pacific Bell Park

    Jose Mesa
    101.0 mph
    1993
    Cleveland Stadium

    Guillermo Mota
    101.0 mph
    07-24-2002
    Qualcomm Stadium

    Billy Wagner
    101.0 mph
    06-11-2003
    Yankee Stadium

    Nolan Ryan
    100.9 mph
    08-20-1974
    Anaheim Stadium

    Josh Beckett
    100.0 mph
    10-12-2003
    Pro Player Park

    Daniel Cabrera
    100.0 mph
    05-09-2005
    Camden Yards

    Roger Clemens
    100.0 mph
    10-10-2001
    Yankee Stadium

    Bartolo Colon
    100.0 mph
    10-06-1999
    Jacobs Field

    Francisco Cordero
    100.0 mph
    07-07-2004
    Jacobs Field

    Rich Harden
    100.0 mph
    05-27-2005
    McAfee Stadium

    Jorge Julio
    100.0 mph
    09-16-2004
    Skydome

    J.R. Richard
    100.0 mph
    1976
    Candlestick Park

    C.C. Sabathia
    100.0 mph
    2002
    Jacobs Field

    Ben Sheets
    100.0 mph
    07-10-2004
    Miller Park

    Derrick Turnbow
    100.0 mph
    05-27-2005
    Miller Park

    Kerry Wood
    100.0 mph
    08-10-2005
    Wrigley Field
     

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