Federal Judges strike again.

Discussion in '2003 Archive' started by Jailminister, Jul 2, 2003.

  1. Jailminister

    Jailminister
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    © 2003 WorldNetDaily.com

    A Ten Commandments display in the rotunda of the Alabama Supreme Court building must be removed because it violates the First Amendment's ban on establishment of religion, a federal appeals court ruled today.

    Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, who has become known as the "Ten Commandments judge," was sued by the American Civil Liberties Union after placing the monument in the courthouse in the middle of the night in July 2001. The four-foot-tall, two-ton granite display features the Commandments inscribed on two tablets along with historical quotations.


    Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore

    The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the trial court's decision that the monument be removed.

    "If we adopted his position, the chief justice would be free to adorn the walls of the Alabama Supreme Court's courtroom with sectarian religious murals and have decidedly religious quotations painted above the bench," the three-judge panel said, according to the Associated Press.

    "Every government building could be topped with a cross, or a menorah, or a statue of Buddha, depending upon the views of the officials with authority over the premises," said the panel.

    However, supporters of Moore said the monument was intended "to remind everyone of the moral foundation of the laws of Alabama and the United States."

    The Michigan-based Thomas More Law Center, which filed a brief on behalf of the Alabama judge, noted today's ruling came one week after another federal appellate court, the 3rd Circuit in Philadelphia, upheld display of the Ten Commandments on a wall outside a courthouse.

    "Because there appears to be a conflict between the decisions of these appellate courts, we hope the United States Supreme Court will review these cases and reaffirm government's ability to acknowledge in public our religious heritage, especially the moral foundation of our law," said Edward L. White III, associate counsel for the legal group.

    White argued a display on public property that includes the Commandments is proper and permissible because the First Amendment mandates an accommodation of religious faith and is not restricted to only the secular.

    In a statement announcing the appeal last year, Moore said: "Federal district courts have no jurisdiction or authority to prohibit the acknowledgment of God that is specifically recognized in the Constitution of Alabama."

    Moore first drew national attention after posting a wooden, hand-carved plaque of the Ten Commandments in his courtroom while a state court judge in Gadsden, Ala. The Civil Liberties Union of Alabama and the state of Alabama unsuccessfully sued Moore in 1995 over his actions. He then mounted and won by a landslide margin an election to the Alabama Supreme Court in 2000, which he viewed as a mandate from the people to "restore the moral foundation of law."
     
  2. ScottEmerson

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    That may be a good thing. I, for one, cannot imagine living in a world where there are pentagrams or Buddha statues in front of all of the courts of law in Florida where I live, which is what COULD have happened. I can see why non-Christians would feel the same way about the Ten Commandments. I can agree, but I imagine that the Supreme Court will eventually have the final say.
     
  3. KenH

    KenH
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    The extreme religious right is learning that in politics sometimes you're the windshield and sometimes you're the bug.
     
  4. massdak

    massdak
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    extreme? the extreme is on the left not the right. Christians want to protect what was once this country's values to honor God more or less.
    has your doctrine diminished? were you once leaning with the calvinist, yet with a universalistic belief? can the two even come together? you seem now to have a beef with fundamentalist why?
     
  5. KenH

    KenH
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    I do not advocate a theocracy. I fear that there are extremists among fundamentalists that, if they ever hold the levers of power in this country, will forbid the practice of any religion in the United States except for Christianity, and then only their version of Christianity, as they do not believe in separation of church and state, even within the parameters of the U.S. Constitution(I am not referring to the ACLU distorted version). :(
     

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