Gangsta Rap

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by Berean, Jun 30, 2011.

  1. Berean

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    Let me share an interesting personal happening that recently took place.Some three or 4 years ago on the home from church one Sunday afternoon my wife and I were discussing the music that particular day which we did not particularly enjoy and I said to my wife "We had better learn to accept contemporary music because they would be doing gangsta rap within 10 years", her reply was "it will never happen." I assured that it would not come from the choir but through the children, they would perform come christian lyrics to gr music and all the grandmas and sunday school teachers would remark Oh how precious! (This is the camels nose under the tent)
    Well last week our church had a Parents night (VBS children performing for the parents.) You guessed it, the music was done to gangsta rap.
     
  2. PeterM

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    How does one differentiate "rap" as a genre or style of "hip hop" from what you term "gangsta rap"?

    As a music style rap has been around for decades, only finding wide stream popularity after the disco age ran its course. CCM groups like One Way and DC Talk pioneered the rap genre in faith circles in the late 1980s and 90s. While there are certainly more intense styles of hip hop within the CCM genre, I don't think Gangsta Rap as you call it could ever be a vehicle for the gospel because of its focus on the gang culture.

    Could you describe what you mean by "gangsta rap"?
     
  3. convicted1

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    Gangsta wrap is what they use in the 'hood during CHRISTmas. LOL

    Gangsta rap was something I loved back in my sinner days, and me a white boy. I loved Tupac, Notorious B.I.G, Puff Daddy, Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg, Ice Cube, etc. Basically, gangsta rap was rap music from rappers that grew up in places like Compton, Ca, and all they knew was violence...or this is what I have gleaned from it. It was centered around guns, murder, violence, etc. Notorious B.I.G was shot down a few months after Tupac Shakur was, and some think that his(B.I.G'S) was in retalliation of Tupac's murder. Things like this caused Snoop Dogg and Dr. Dre to leave Death Row Records and start their own. WORD!!!
     
  4. Berean

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  5. rbell

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    What's the difference, Berean, between rap and "gangsta rap?" Just trying to understand your position.
     
  6. freeatlast

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    I really hope that you are not correct and using the term Gangsta rap incorrectly. If not I suggest that you leave that church right away.
    Gangsta rap is a genre of hip-hop that reflects the violent lifestyles of inner-city youth. The genre was pioneered around 1983 by Ice T with songs like "Cold Winter Madness" and "Body Rock/Killers." Gangsta rap was popularized by illustrious rap groups like NWA and Boogie Down Productions in the late 80s and it is full of filthy language, nudity, and out right rebellion acted out in a tempo and beat that sets the stage for those with the same ideals.

    My guess is you mean rap, not gangsta rap, as rap is the telling of a story to a rhythmic beat that does not push the lewd and filthy side of a rebellious people. I certainly have no use for gangsta rap and am convinced it has no place in the Christian’s life. I can see how rap might have some use to spread the message of the gospel, but I question the use of it for entertainment in the church unless that is the culture of that particular church.
     
  7. preachinjesus

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    There is so much misconception and stereotyping in the above posts that it is hard to reply.

    There is a significant difference in hip-hip, rap, r&b, and urban music cultures. There is some rather good music in each category, and some fairly terrible music in each category. Right now the whole music industry is heading towards more electronic, hip-hop oriented releases.

    It's just music. The style of the music isn't nearly as important as what is being said in the words. Did the kids enjoy it? Probably and that's a good thing. If I can use a particular style of music to get a message across more clearly to some than great, let's use that style of music. We have enough missiological barriers in place right now that if we can use a rap song to break a few down, I'm all for it.
     
  8. sag38

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    Gangsta Rap is a version of rap music that is defined by the lyrics reflecting the gang culture. Berean, most likely, is very misinformed and is associating his dislike of a particular style of music with the music being ungodly. Seems that is a very popular today amongst some Christians and it is sad. The lyrics and those who are rapping to the music are the ones who make it godly or ungodly. Most white folks don't like rap music because it comes from African American culture and for many the dislike is based in racism.
     
  9. Baptist Believer

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    Yes, absolutely.

    Possibly. I'd be careful about assuming too much.

    Absolutely!

    Ehh... I'd be careful about throwing around the charge of racism.

    I'm sure racism is involved for some people, but mostly, I suspect, it is a cultural thing. Many white folks don't like it because it is from outside of their culture and they don't understand it.

    I strongly suspect that most African American folks don't like polka or Tejano music, but I don't anyone would accuse them of racism.

    For the record, I'm not a big fan of rap music, but I have grown to appreciate some of it over the years as I've become more familiar with it.
     
  10. Alive in Christ

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    To my ears ALL rap noise...be it gansta rap, *regular* rap, christian rap, or any other form of this noise is completely unlistenable to my ears. Extremely painful to listen to. As a musician I find it repulsive.

    And this from a white guy who has had a life time love of so much of of the incredible music that has come, and continues to come, from the African/American community.

    Since some people like rap noise I am glad that some christians are doing it as a form of evangelism. No problem with that all, but I just cant be within ear shot of it when it is happening.

    On the other hand, I have heard some hip hop that actually sounds good. I have enjoyed some hip hop music. Its just the rap I cant tolerate beyond 30 seconds of so.
     
  11. Alive in Christ

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    sag38

    I am as white as the driven snow, yet I have had a lifetme love of music that has come out of the African/American community.

    Some of my all time favorites...

    Aretha Franklin
    Al Green
    Smokey Robinson
    B.B. King
    Freddy King
    Gladys Knight and the Pips
    Wilson Pickett
    Brook Benton
    John Coltrane
    Miles Davis
    James Brown
    Stevie Wonder
    Curtis Mayfield.

    etc,etc,etc...
     
  12. sag38

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    Notice that I didn't say everyone. In the circles that I come from, the deep south, when rap first became popular many white boys didn't like it because it came from across the tracks and not their own neighborhood. It was racist. Now days there are many whites, even in the deep south, who like rap.
     
  13. rbell

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    Still waiting for Berean's definition of "gangsta rap."

    If we're going to make an accusation--particularly one that is hurtful or difficult...we should at the very least be specific and be willing to define our terms.
     
  14. Alive in Christ

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    Well, maybe with some of them, but not others. Could be that they werent racist, they simply...like me...find rap to be a horribly wreched noise...and could'nt tolerate the sound of it .

    I'm sure thats true. Its that way here as well. I personally cant understand how anyone, black white blue or green, can want that noise going in their ears.

    *Some* Hip Hop that I have overheard accidently actually sounded kinda cool, but Rap has never sounded anything but wretched to me.
     
  15. nodak

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    I'm going to get in trouble again, but music is not....just.....music.

    No matter the style, including my personal favorites.

    It comes with a whole load of culture right along with it--the hair, the clothes, the walk, the attitude, and the beliefs.

    Now, when our dear Lord saved my soul, I knew INSTANTLY that while I could salvage much in my hillbilly heritage and native american heritage blend, there was some stuff that had to go.

    I'm not going to fill my house with kachina dolls. I'm not going to cover myself with scads of silver and turquoise. I'm not about to sing any hymns to a native chant because those chants carry with them, in the very how they are done, pagan religion.

    I'm not going to do honky tonk music either. Country gospel, yes, but not that honky tonk sounding country gospel. Not gonna act or dress like a bar fly either. Ditto the hair, the makeup, etc.

    I'm sorry, but I disagree strongly with today's mission theory that culture is neutral, and we need to bring Jesus but not address changing the culture.

    The culture of sin and rebellion is rampant, it is everywhere, and it infests virtually every culture. We have to address that.

    We need to teach folks that choosing to follow Jesus is gonna lead them right out of the cesspool. It is going to require some changes.

    And we need to help them, many times, choose a whole 'nother culture.

    Which is why I don't attend the local honky tonk sounding acting church, or the next closest rock and roll and rebellion (THEIR WORDS).
     
  16. sag38

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    That's why you go to your church and I go to mine. We would be like oil and water. My church uses God's word. You prefer to use I and II Opinions to form your narrow minded, judgmental, theology.
     
  17. TC

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    I listen to a fair rap/r&b/hip-hop. There is a lot of good stuff in there, just got to weed out the junk - same as every other form of music I listen to.
     
  18. freeatlast

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    Stand strong. Your thoughts are correct. :thumbs:
     
  19. nodak

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    sag38--rather than debate, I'm going to ask you to go read the book of I Samuel.

    Right around chapter 15 you will find God telling His people to utterly destroy the Amalekites.

    They decide to destroy ALMOST everything, but keep the fattest and best of the flocks and bring them to sacrifice on the altar to the One True God.

    God wasn't impressed. Through Samuel, He chews them out. Because of it Saul is rejected as king over the chosen people, leading to David's kingdom.

    You may consider it judgemental and narrowminded, so take it up with God.

    Many things in a culture are not about worshipping idols. Fry bread is not about idol worship, and if you lived close by I'd be happy to make you some. Oh--and I use baking powder. I don't chew the flour and spit it in the dough to make it rise. I'm choosy about which parts of culture I keep.

    But many things in ANY culture ARE all about idol worship. THOSE things need to be left off. We ARE told to come ye out from among them and be ye separate. That is pretty plain.

    Rap is not "urban" music nor is it "black" music. It is a genre that sprung from idolizing rule breaking and rebellion. Not exactly supposed to be the trademarks of a Christian.

    I don't want anyone to see anything in my behavior that makes them wonder Who I worship, or if I just worship myself.

    We are supposed to be in the world but not of it.

    So as offensive as it is to some, when a streetwalker gets saved she needs to wash her body and face and change clothes, but she cannot hold on to her "culture" and Jesus at the same time.

    That is pretty graphic and offensive I know. But God calls holding on to anything related to idol worship as spiritual adultery or going wh**ing.

    So again, yes, you may be right, it may be judgemental. It is also obedient.

    And rebellion is as the sin of witchcraft.
     
  20. sag38

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    Your argument from I Samuel just doesn't hold up. There are many pagans who listen to music that sounds very similar to church music. So, when they come to Christ should they reject any music that sound like what they used to listen to before they came to Christ? They should according to your argument. Here's what's so offensive about your position. You have provided nothing but a judgmental attitude about particular genres of music. You have provided nothing but the same old arguments that folks use to claim a higher spiritual ground when it comes to music and their "preference" for what they call traditional music. When you have something of substance to add to the argument maybe then you will catch our ear. Opinions, prejudices, and personal anecdotes will not do to the trick.
     

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