Good online resource for study of the Koran

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by reformedbeliever, Apr 4, 2007.

  1. reformedbeliever

    reformedbeliever
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    We are hosting an exchange student from Azerbaijan this coming August, for ten months. She is Shiite Muslim... although they don't practice the religion. They are kinda like many Christians... professors but not possessors. I thought I would read the Koran and study up a bit before she gets here. Does anyone have an online resources for such a study? My Contemporary Theology teacher told me one time that we are spiritual pathologists. In order to be able physicans of spiritual matters we have to know the germs of other theological orientations. I hope to be able to witness to this young lady with a knowledge of her theology. I know she will witness the Gospel through my preaching and teaching, but above all I pray that she will see that we live the Gospel.... and í'm praying for her to be born again. Please keep us in your prayers as we take the Gospel to all nations. Thank you in advance for your recommendations on resources for the Koran.
     
  2. Plain Old Bill

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    #2 Plain Old Bill, Apr 4, 2007
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  3. amity

    amity
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    Well, the Koran is online, of course.
    http://quod.lib.umich.edu/k/koran/

    But just reading the Koran will not bring you familiarity with Shi'a faith, that is for sure. Shi'ite Islam is very different from more mainstream Islam (Sunni or Wahabbi). It is viewed by other Muslims as the superstitious branch of the faith. Lots of martyrs and saints, seen by most other Muslims as idolatry. This is why Shi'ites often do suffer some disabilities within those Muslim countries where they are a minority. Shi'ism developed from a series of martyrdoms of some of the prophet Mohammad's family and disciples after his death (and after the Koran was fully written). Some fo these people developed sort of a cult following among those who ascribed supernatural powers and significance to them.

    I feel myself groping for words here, because I want to say more, and I am not sure what to say exactly. I lived in Muslim countries for quite awhile, and I was very comfortable with Islam, but Shi'ia practices and beliefs could, I admit, sometimes make me uncomfortable. I know the way I have described it is going to draw a parallel with Catholicism in your mind. Although it might be similar to some forms of "folk Catholicism," there is nonetheless much more to it than that. Be prepared for a sort of 'magical' approach to life, if I can put it that way. Talismans, reenactments of martyrdom, self-flagellation, lucky hands and evil eyes and so forth. Very much overshadowed by local culture, sort of a "folk belief" which can vary from one place to another, but many practices which are only related to the Koran tangentially if at all. I don't know anything about Azerbaijan, so can't address the specific form it may take there.

    Here is an article on the Sunni/Shi'a split historically, but it doesn't really give much of the flavor of Shi'ism and the forms that it takes, if you ask me:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historic_background_of_the_Sunni-Shi'a_split

    Of course if her family has really secularized themselves then she might be quite turned off by some aspects of Shi'ism herself.
     
    #3 amity, Apr 4, 2007
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  4. reformedbeliever

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    Thank you for the replies. I've been to good ole wiki... and have researched the internet some. I have a lot of learning to accomplish.
    This girl's family is very intelligent. Her grandmother is a doctor, along with her mother and father. They are not devout Muslims at all. They seldom go to the religious service nor do they pray daily. Very much like most professing christians.
    I want to educate myself on the Quran, and to be able to at least say i've read it. When she gets here i'm sure I will know more of where to start. We will simply welcome her as a part of our family before we get into theology. She will however be exposed to Christianity... as we believe in corporate prayer as a family. I just hope to not be completely ignorant of her faith. It would be nice if I knew more about it than she does.... and that would not be much of a problem if she is like most christians, who never read their book. Thanks.
     

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