Have you folks any clue how Roman Catholic you all sound to me?

Discussion in '2005 Archive' started by mioque, Apr 21, 2005.

  1. mioque

    mioque
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    The word Calvary (as in Calvary Baptist) that's a Roman Catholic word, the proper non-RC word is ofcourse Golgotha.
    And the word pastor, tssk,tssk unacceptable. Has been used by the RCC to refer to their parishpriests much too long (parish is by the way also an exclusively RC term).
    And missionary, that's another purely Roman Catholic word. Missionaries are always RC, remember all of you who claimed that the RCC has a different Gospel? Different name for doing a different job. Usually female baptist missionaries who get martyred somewhere in the world miraculously transfigure into nuns in the newspaper accounts around here. After all they were missionaries and not zendelingen.
    That word congregation, can't pass muster either. A bunch of monks/nuns living together that's a congregation, so is a department of the Vatican.

    English-------- -Dutch RC-----Dutch not-RC

    parish -----------parochie-------gemeente
    parishioner ----parochiaan---gemeentelid
    Calvary-----------Calvarie-------Golgotha
    congregation---Congregatie--gemeente
    missionary ----Missionaris ---zendeling
    pastor ---------pastoor/pastor---dominee


    The relevance of all of this? None, but it's surprising how much distinctly RC terminology has been retained by the baptists of the Englishspeaking world.
     
  2. USN2Pulpit

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    I'm shocked and appalled... :cool:
     
  3. dianetavegia

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    Theater: from Latin theātrum, from Greek theātron, from theāsthai, to watch, from theā, a viewing.

    Police: from Late Latin polītīa, from Latin, the State, from Greek polīteia, from polītēs, citizen, from polis, city.

    College: from Latin collēgium, association. See collegium

    Dentist: from Latin dēns, dent-.]

    Galaxy: from Late Latin galaxiās, from Greek, from gala, galakt-, milk

    Sugar: from Medieval Latin succārum,

    Diet: from Latin diaeta, way of living

    Coffin: from Latin cophinus

    :rolleyes: [​IMG]
     
  4. dh1948

    dh1948
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    Posts such as Mioque's deserve no response. A mind is a terrible thing to waste.
     
  5. Terry_Herrington

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    Your response contradicts your response.
     
  6. mioque

    mioque
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    dh1948
    I see I hit a nerve.
    [​IMG]

    dianetavegia
    Your examples are simply words borrowed by the English language from Latin.
    Both Dutch and English easily have 100+ of those.
    In fact 6 of the loan words you list are basically shared by Dutch and English.

    If I were to hazard a serious guess about why there is so much shared RC/baptist vocabulary, I'd say it's caused by the considerable influence of Anglicanism on baptist Christianity which made the seperation between Catholic and Protestant in some ways less sharp in the English speaking world than overhere.
     
  7. Soulman

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    It doesn't matter that some of the terninology is the same as long as the doctrine is not.

    Posted by mioque: I'd say it's caused by the considerable influence of Anglicanism on baptist Christianity which made the seperation between Catholic and Protestant in some ways less sharp in the English speaking world than overhere.

    What has made the seperation of Catholic and Christian less sharp is the apathetic way Christians are uniting. It's all the warm and fuzzies at the sacrifice of the truth. God is against the ecumenicisim of today but it will not be stopped.

    The mind is a terrible thing!
     
  8. Bob Krajcik

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    "...considerable influence of Angli....

    Yes, angling is great. Fishing is a reel sport.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Soulman

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    I'm hooked!
     
  10. blackbird

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    I might sound like a catholic

    I might even look like a catholic

    But I'm really a died in the wool Southern Baptist
     
  11. untangled

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    Catholics use the name Jesus. What should I refer to Jesus as now, Ernie?
     
  12. Gold Dragon

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    I hope you really meant dyed, although wool wouldn't be too bad a way to go. ;)
     
  13. mioque

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    untangled
    I prefer Jezus myself, but so does the RCC around here. ;)
     
  14. rsr

    rsr
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    mioque said:

    "I'd say it's caused by the considerable influence of Anglicanism on baptist Christianity which made the seperation between Catholic and Protestant in some ways less sharp in the English speaking world than overhere."

    Possible, although if it was it would most likely be second-hand through the Methodists, with whom the Baptists were in competition with since the Second Great Awakening.

    BTW: I have not found parish/parishoner at all current in Baptist circles, and pastor[i/]in these parts is used most often to refer to Protestants.
     
  15. chipsgirl

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    I don't see what the big deal is. Different cultures interpret words differently and meanings of words evolve over time. So what. That's not what matters. It sounds to me like you are just trying to pick a fight.
     
  16. blackbird

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    I hope you really meant dyed, although wool wouldn't be too bad a way to go. ;) </font>[/QUOTE]Goooooooooooood Nite, Gold Dragon!!! I'm glad you caught that spelling error!!! That's what I meant to say--

    dyed

    as in, dyed

    not

    died

    Blackbird

    PS---though when I die this dyed in the wool Southern Baptist is gonna be one dead dyed in the wool Southern Baptist!!!
     
  17. mioque

    mioque
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    rsr
    "I have not found parish/parishoner at all current in Baptist circles,"
    "
    I seem to recall having it seen used by baptists talking about baptists on this board once or twice.

    " and pastor[i/]in these parts is used most often to refer to Protestants. "
    "
    The exact opposite of the way it's used around here.

    chipsgirl
    I find it interesting that some on this Board get so worked up about such a historic side issue.
     
  18. USN2Pulpit

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    Isn't "Jesus" the Greek form of the Hebrew name "Yeshua?" Today's equivalent being Joshua - perhaps we should go that route...it would be proper, I think - but today's modern Christian would be confused, I'm sure!
     
  19. HankD

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    Old habits (pardon the pun?) die hard mioque.

    You trouble maker you [​IMG]

    HankD
     
  20. dianetavegia

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    Yep, Mioque is trying to get our 'feathers in a dander' (or is that Catholic for nuns night out?) :eek:
     

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