Here we go again

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by Servent, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. Servent

    Servent
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    Newdow Files Suit To Take National Motto Off Currency

    Tells ACLU meeting "In God We Trust" must go


    Michael Newdow, who has already filed a suit to take "under God" out of the Pledge of Allegiance, is now suing to remove our national motto from our currency.

    Newdow told the ACLU of Oklahoma that the national motto on U.S. currency is a violation of the separation of church and state. He is offended because he is an atheist. He wants to use the Federal courts to make his atheism the official religion of America.

    Newdow filed in the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals which recently ruled that judges, not parents, have the final say in what will be taught school children concerning sex education. These same liberal judges supported Newdow and ruled that the phrase "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance was unconstitutional. That suit was dismissed due to a technicality so Newdow sued again.

    The 9th U.S. Circuit is expected to agree with Newdow. The case will then go to the U.S. Supreme Court for final action.

    Help us secure one million signatures on the petition below to stop Newdow. Remember that only one person—Madelyn Murray O'Hare—was able to get prayer in schools banned. We must not allow one person—Newdow—to get our national motto removed from our currency by our silence.

    During the last session of Congress, Representative Chip Pickering introduced a constitutional amendment to guarantee the right to use and recite the motto and the Pledge of Allegiance. Your petition will encourage Rep. Pickering to re-introduce his constitutional amendment in the present session of Congress and send a message to the liberal judges of the 9th U.S. Circuit.

    Please act quickly, and forward this to friends and family.

    Sincerely,

    Don

    Donald E. Wildmon, Founder and Chairman
    American Family Association

    P.S. Please forward this e-mail message to your family and friends!


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  2. rsr

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    How in the world would Wildmon raise money if Newdow didn't keep himself in the spotlight? (This suit, like his others, will go nowhere.)

    BTW: Prayer is not banned in public schools.
     
  3. Gwyneth

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    I hear that we are not to say BC (before Christ,)when refering to a year, but must now use BP (before present) :rolleyes: Haven`t heard what they are thinking of saying instead of AD.......maybe they`ll say Amoco for that, seeing as were using oil company names [​IMG]
     
  4. Helen

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    Actually, it is generally BCE (before common era) and CE (common era) in many writings now...
     
  5. bapmom

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    The substitute for AD has been CE....current era.

    good joke, though.... [​IMG]
     
  6. NaasPreacher (C4K)

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    I would have no problem removing "In God We Trust" from our currency since the vast majority of the country trusts the currency more than they trust GOd.
     
  7. Marco

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    The good thing about this is the fact it stirs up debate about God. I think it's good when people start looking into these kinds of things. It may bring about a whole new group of believers. I'm not threatened he wants to take the word 'God' off money. I don't think it changes a thing. In my opinion.
     
  8. rsr

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    Amen. I've long thought it was a bit hypocritical ... but very, very American.
     
  9. Johnv

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    It's typically BCE and ACE (before the common era and after the common era). As we know, the origins of the Christian Calender resulted in us using "BC and AD" (why in English we mix English and Latin in dating is beyond me). The problem with these is that updates to the calendar have left these descriptions quite inaccurate. Christ was likely born somewhere around 4bc to 7 bc, a bit of a paradox. BCE and ACE have been used in the archaeology world for quite some time. They are by no means new. I'm a bit of a loss as to why there's a broughaha over their use now.

    It's correct to use BCE and ACE when referring to archeological or global historical topics. Use of AD and BC are commonly used elsewhere, but they are as inaccurate as Anno Mundi (AM), the year of creation, which has long since been dropped. Likewise dropped is Anno Salutis (AS), the year of salvation. What confuses the use is that Ante Christum (AC), meaning before Christ, has also been used in place of "BC".

    Anno Domini is the Roman expression for "The year of the dominium of the Lord", or simply "the year of the Lord". "Lord" originally referred to the highest office of the Roman Empire. At that time this was Julius Caesar and it related to any year he was in office.

    Now, "B.C." stands for any year "before Ceasar". This is to say the Romans could not care less what came before Ceasar, and remember, the Romans ruled! As with BC, Christianity saw this as a golden opportunity to make this one of their own significance, by simply changing it to "Before Christ." Since the Greek word for king is "Christos", it fit (The Roman word REX or the Hebrew word MELEG would not have worked). We can thank Dionysius Exiguus for the AD and BC standard (circa AD 525). Dionysius originally intended them refer to separate and distinct eras. He did not intend to have them be used in a linear calendric timeline in the manner which we use them today. It was not until 1657 that the BC and AD dates were used on a numberline (or dateline). It was at this time the magic quadratic question came up: There is no year "0". The year "0"'s absence is due to Dionysius never intending to use both eras on a common timeline.

    So here we are, stuck with a yearing system that is fatally flawed by the fact that negative numbers on a timeline is veboten, though any other numeric line requires negative number use, as well as use of a zero meridian. If we had it to do over again, we would certainly make it so that a time line would work (probably referencing a cosmic or stellar event) but we are stuck with a system that predates the integers, and we can't pretend otherwise.
     
  10. Magnetic Poles

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    My dollars will spend just as well regardless of any mottos, slogans, or sayings. As long as it is legal tender, they can put "Go Broncos!" on it.
     
  11. Woodymdt

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    I think the Supreme Court already denied to hear this argument.
     

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