How federal cronies built -- and botched -- Healthcare.gov

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Bro. Curtis, Oct 14, 2013.

  1. Bro. Curtis

    Bro. Curtis
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    http://www.infoworld.com/t/e-government/how-federal-cronies-built-and-botched-healthcaregov-228724

    ..."All but one of of the 47 contractors who won contracts to carry out work on the Affordable Care Act worked for the government prior to its passage," the report reads. Some of the names ought to be familiar: Northrop Grumman, General Dynamics, Deloitte, and Booz Allen Hamilton, all of whom assumed different roles and worked on different aspects of the project.

    As familiar as those names might be, especially to those who follow Beltway lobbying practices, few of them would be as commonly associated with large-scale IT projects as, say, Google, Amazon.com, or Dell would be -- especially when it came to building the public-facing components of the system. (Techdirt concurs.)

    Why did they get the work? The report hints at a likely reason: The companies were big lobbyists, with "some 17 contract winners reported spending more than $128 million on lobbying in 2011 and 2012." Granted, some experience with government work is vital for any contractor, and the federal procurement system is geared to favor those already doing government work, but Sunlight pointed out that the list tips heavily toward those with both existing contracts and political leverage.

    The most central name in the list of contractors, and the one most closely identified with the outward failure of Healthcare.gov, is CGI Federal, which the Sunlight Foundation describes as "a longtime provider of IT services to the federal government." Most of CGI Federal's previous work centered around technology services for Medicare and Medicaid. According to the New York Times, CGI Federal claimed many problems stemmed from the way the government itself managed the process, including the in-house coordination of the project between subcontractors rather than having a separate contractor do the coordination itself.

    All the same, CGI Federal -- which received $88 million for its work since March of this year -- told Congress in September it was indeed ready for the onslaught of users that would come when Healthcare.gov opened to the public. The same was claimed by UnitedHeath subsidiary Quality Software Services, another partner in the project that received $55 million for its work....
     
  2. poncho

    poncho
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    Tech news site Digital Trends reveals that CGI Federal received $634,320,919 in taxpayer money to construct Healthcare.gov, which amounts to more than was spent creating Linkedin ($200 million) and Spotify ($288 million) combined. It also amounts to more than was initially required to create Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

    Fox News also reported last week that senior White House officials probably knew that the site was not ready when it was launched.

    Robert Laszewski, a consultant with clients in the healthcare industry participating in the new exchange, said insurance companies were complaining “loudly” that the site had experienced problems before the launch. “People were pulling out their hair,” he told The Washington Post Wednesday.

    The New York Times reports that Henry Chao, described as “the chief digital architect for the Obama administration’s new online insurance marketplace,” was “deeply worried about the web site’s debut” way back in March. Chao commented that he hoped Obamacare would not amount to “a third-world experience.”

    Some might say that this is an insult to third world web developers.

    The Times also quotes an insurance executive who has participated in many conference calls on the federal exchange. “These are not glitches,” the executive stated, “The extent of the problems is pretty enormous. At the end of our calls, people say, ‘It’s awful, just awful.’”

    http://www.prisonplanet.com/obamaca...-cannot-sign-up-a-fortnight-after-launch.html

    Obviously this was all due to some vast right wing conspiracy to make sure the computer code was corrupted beyond repair to embarrass Obama. :rolleyes:

    Once again the alternative media (Mike Adams Natural News) broke the story of the "funky full of junkie" corrupt computer code and the MSM is being forced to play catch up again.
     
    #2 poncho, Oct 15, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 15, 2013
  3. thisnumbersdisconnected

    thisnumbersdisconnected
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    This is good stuff, Ponch. Thanks. :thumbsup:
     
  4. poncho

    poncho
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    This is what Forbes is saying.

    Obamacare's Website Is Crashing Because It Doesn't Want You To Know How Costly Its Plans Are

    ‘It’s awful, just awful’

    Robert Pear and colleagues at the New York Times have a piece up today detailing the serious problems with the federal exchange, problems that may get worse, not better. They confirm what we already knew: that the Obama administration refused to delay the implementation of the exchanges, despite the well-known problems, because they were afraid of the political blowback. “Former government officials say the White House, which was calling the shots, feared that any backtracking would further embolden Republican critics who were trying to repeal the health care law.”

    As I documented last week, IT and insurance experts have been saying for at least eight months that implementation of the exchanges was going badly, that as early as February officials were warning of a “third world experience.” The Times’ sources are just as blunt. “These are not glitches,” said one insurance executive. “The extent of the problems is pretty enormous. At the end of our [conference calls with the administration], people say, ‘It’s awful, just awful.’”

    “We foresee a train wreck,” said another executive in a February interview with the Times. “We don’t have the IT specifications. The level of angst in health plans is growing by leaps and bounds. The political people in the administration do not understand how far behind they are.” Richard Foster, the former chief actuary at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said last week that “so much testing of the new system was so far behind schedule, I was not confident it would work well.”

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/theapot...now-health-plans-true-costs/?partner=yahootix
     
    #4 poncho, Oct 15, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 15, 2013

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