Is it okay to read fantasy?

Discussion in '2000-02 Archive' started by IlovetheBible, Dec 19, 2002.

  1. IlovetheBible

    IlovetheBible
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Is it okay for children and/or adults to read fantasy? I mean books like Alice in Wonderland, Redwall, fairytales, Tom and Huck, that type of stuff?
     
  2. Wisdom Seeker

    Wisdom Seeker
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Messages:
    5,702
    Likes Received:
    0
  3. Johnv

    Johnv
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    21,321
    Likes Received:
    0
    I hope so. I'm currently reading the third LOTR book [​IMG]
     
  4. IlovetheBible

    IlovetheBible
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    The real question I suppose is: Who is going to catch on first where I'm taking this? :D
     
  5. Rev. G

    Rev. G
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2002
    Messages:
    1,635
    Likes Received:
    0
    Only if it's Tolkien. Or C. S. Lewis. :D

    Yes, it is.
     
  6. Sherrie

    Sherrie
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2002
    Messages:
    10,274
    Likes Received:
    0
    Don't know Adam, where is this suppose to be going?

    There is no reason why you could not read fantasy. Its knowing the difference between fantasy and real life.

    Sherrie
     
  7. donnA

    donnA
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2000
    Messages:
    23,354
    Likes Received:
    0
    Fantsy or fiction? There is a difference. Even though both are made up, and could be said to be both, yet in writting there is a difference. I have read fantasy before, long ago, don't care for it. LOTR is fantasy.
     
  8. Christian41974

    Christian41974
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    I believe it matters what kind of fantasy. I don't like Harry Potter or some others ,and would not suggest you read that ,but what is wrong with Old Huck Fin or some other good decent books. I have read of great preachers who read after Greek philosophers ,but this was only for expansion of the mind not for real truths. Reading broadens your vocabulary and tends to make one smarter and think more. Plus if you watch tv you already are giving your children plenty of fantasy which will not help half as much as reading a book. Reading probably should be spaced out of different genres of books(bio,fiction,nonfiction,and so forth and so on, leaving out soap operas of course) [​IMG]
     
  9. IlovetheBible

    IlovetheBible
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    CDGriffin- Thanks. You opened the door for my next question- why is it okay to read Huck Finn, yet not okay to read Harry Potter? According to you that is?
     
  10. rsr

    rsr
    Expand Collapse
    <b> 7,000 posts club</b>
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2001
    Messages:
    10,074
    Likes Received:
    101
    OK, Adam. What is the difference between fiction and fantasy? I'll bite.
     
  11. Refreshed

    Refreshed
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2002
    Messages:
    901
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey, not all fiction or fantasy is bad, but I think if it depicts witchcraft or sorcery in a positive way it goes against the Bible.
     
  12. IlovetheBible

    IlovetheBible
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Hey! Who is asking the questions here [​IMG]

    I would think that the difference would lie in that fantasy cannot happen where as fiction could happen. What I'm trying to get at does lie closely around my first question- whether it is okay to read fantasy or not.

    Here is another one- is reading fantasy God honoring?

    (post script- I'm playing devils advocate in some of these questions, just so you know and don't think i'm completely crazy)
     
  13. Ben W

    Ben W
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2002
    Messages:
    8,868
    Likes Received:
    0
    Books like Harry Potter that are about witchcraft would not gel with the bible when it states to have nothing to do with witchcraft. fantasy, if it is some type of make believe story is quite o.k.

    I can not wait to see the Twin Towers installment of the Lord of the Rings epic. [​IMG]
     
  14. Dr. Bob

    Dr. Bob
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2000
    Messages:
    29,402
    Likes Received:
    12
    Fantasy has inherrent difficulties, as it may have spiritual implications (compared to Tom Sawyer, Treasure Island et al) and supernatural that touches on the occult.

    That's why I don't mind (though don't care much about) Star Wars. Pure fiction set in the future. But I do fuss with Harry Potter and even so-called Christian "Lion, Witch and Wardrobe".
     
  15. Caretaker

    Caretaker
    Expand Collapse
    <img src= /drew.gif>

    Joined:
    May 20, 2002
    Messages:
    634
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ;

    Would not the target audience need to also be considered? Harry Potter was aimed and most influential in the readership in the grade and middle school age. LOTR and the Lion, Witch, and the Wardrobe, are more for an older readership, in the High Scool age, who are more able to discern between reality and fiction.

    Another point would be that LOTR and Lion, witch, Wardrobe, are so fantasy that the stark contrast with reality is readily apparent. Harry Potter on the other hand blurs the line in that the Muggle's world is very modern and comparable to our own, ie. cars, motorcycles, trains, etc.

    A disfunctional child can seek escapism more readily in HP and have a desire for empowerment in their lives drasticly reinforced. This can lead to an interest in witchcraft, and a strong potential to be influenced by occultic involvement.
     
  16. IlovetheBible

    IlovetheBible
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    The twin towers???? You mean the two towers?
     
  17. Acts 1:8

    Acts 1:8
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2002
    Messages:
    645
    Likes Received:
    0
    Adam - follow where the Holy Spirit leads you.
     
  18. Ransom

    Ransom
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2000
    Messages:
    4,132
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dr. Bob Griffin:

    That's why I don't mind (though don't care much about) Star Wars. Pure fiction set in the future. But I do fuss with Harry Potter and even so-called Christian "Lion, Witch and Wardrobe".

    Actually, Star Wars takes place "long ago in a galaxy far, far away," but even so, what is the moral difference between pure fiction set in the future, and pure fiction set in a fantasy world (e.g. Hogwarts, Narnia, Middle-earth)?
     
  19. post-it

    post-it
    Expand Collapse
    <img src=/post-it.jpg>

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2002
    Messages:
    1,785
    Likes Received:
    0
    If picking up a stick (Harry's magic wand) and saying a mystical word, could make a feather float, then I think I could agree that it is wrong.

    But the fact is that witchcraft has as much power to make something occur in a person's life as Harry's crooked wand. Soon all witches realize that they have gained nothing and will continue the spiritual search until they find God.

    The empty spot in a person's heart can be filled with fantasy, fiction, witchcraft, job, sex, drugs, running away, computer games and a million other diversions. None of these can fill the bill, and is part of finding the truth. It is easier to see light when it contrasts against darkness.
     
  20. Ransom

    Ransom
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2000
    Messages:
    4,132
    Likes Received:
    0
    Would not the target audience need to also be considered?

    Yes, but you are largely mistaken about the target audience of each of these works. You are correc that Harry Potter is geared toward upper grade school children. However, the Chronicles of Narnia was not geared toward high-school children, but younger children, say, 8-11. Same with Tolkien's The Hobbit. The Lord of the Rings, on the other hand, was written for a decidedly adult audience - poet W. H. Auden, in his 1954 review of The Fellowship of the Ring for the NYT, said that "No fiction I have read in the last five years has given me more joy than 'The Fellowship of the Ring.'" It seems to be found most frequently in the Young Adult section of the library, but I personally suspect this is due to the foolish idea that adult readers are beyond this sort of thing.

    Most children know the difference between fantasy and reality. Judging by the people who write the most nonsense about Harry Potter and LOTR, on the other hand, it would appear to be the adults who have difficulty distinguishing the two. (I don't know how many very silly critiques of HP I have seen that claim it teaches authentic witchcraft. It is to laugh.)

    Another point would be that LOTR and Lion, witch, Wardrobe, are so fantasy that the stark contrast with reality is readily apparent. Harry Potter on the other hand blurs the line in that the Muggle's world is very modern and comparable to our own, ie. cars, motorcycles, trains, etc.

    I fail to see a difference between there being a gateway to Narnia at the back of a wardrobe, and entering the magical world of Hogwarts via a secret train platform. The "real" and "magical" worlds are equally distinguished in both.

    And remember that LOTR is Tolkien's attempt to fabricate a mythology for England. Implicit in his story-telling is the idea that he is merely the editor of manuscripts written originally by Bilbo and Frodo Baggins. In fact, Bilbo's main motivation for disappearing from the Shire on his eleventy-first birthday was so he could get away from it all and get on with the writing of There and Back Again, which of course we know in our world as The Hobbit.

    Lewis and Rowling, by contrast, make no claims, even fictional or tongue-in-cheek ones, to be writing a "true story."
     

Share This Page

Loading...