Jews Flooding Into Germany

Discussion in '2003 Archive' started by bobfrgsn, Jun 5, 2003.

  1. bobfrgsn

    bobfrgsn
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2003
    Messages:
    330
    Likes Received:
    0
    As a result of this accelerating migration, the Jewish population in Germany has swollen from 33,000 in 1990, the year of that nation's reunification, to 200,000 today, according to Schoeps. Before World War II more than half a million Jews lived in that country. At the end of the war there were only 15,000 left.

    But in 2002, 19,262 Jews from the former Soviet Commonwealth of Independent States settled in Germany, compared with 18,878 who went to Israel and fewer than 10,000 who were admitted into the United States. German consulates in CIS cities report that 70,000 more Jews have already applied for resettlement visas. In addition, thousands of Israelis, whose parents had fled to Palestine in the Nazi years, are now claiming German passports to which they are entitled by German law.

    "Thanks to these developments I believe there is a good chance for the emergence of a new German Jewry," said Schoeps, a historian who was born in World War II in Stockholm, where his parents had found exile. "I absolutely welcome this," Rabbi Carl Feit, a Talmudic scholar and cancer researcher at New York's Yeshiva University, told UPI in an interview.

    Feit interpreted the Jews' return to Germany as "a fulfillment of a biblical spiritual theme -- the rebirth and rejuvenation for which there are many examples in history, where Jewish people in one part of the world or another have seemed to have been eclipsed only to reappear against all odds and common expectations."

    Feit added, "The biblical paradigm for this rebirth was the return of the Jews to Israel" from the Babylonian captivity in 516 B.C.

    There are many ironies in this sudden rejuvenation of Ashkenazic Judaism. The very word, Ashkenaz, which defines German and Eastern European Jews, is the Hebrew term for Germany. This is so, explained Feit, "because the entire Jewish culture in Eastern Europe derives from Jewish communities that lived in three German cities along the Rhine more than 900 years ago."

    "The German and Jewish cultures used to fertilize each other," Feit went on. Yiddish, the idiom spoken by 12 million Jews up until World War II, is essentially a medieval German dialect. The two languages are so close that Arnold Beichman, the New York-born writer and political scientist, often quips, "I like to speak German because it is just Yiddish with a better accent."

    Extremely interesting article and well worth reading. Here is the Link:

    http://www.upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=20030605-051223-2097r
     
  2. Gina B

    Gina B
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2000
    Messages:
    16,944
    Likes Received:
    1
    My family came here from Germany. (not me, grands and such, lol)
    I remember listening to them talking to my great-gramma in Yiddish, it's a neat sounding language. [​IMG] Wish I had learned it, although a number of certain words were incorporated into sentences when speaking English. LOL
    Gina
     
  3. Haruo

    Haruo
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2003
    Messages:
    500
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just ran across a copy of Vol. I of Di brider Ashkenazi by I.I.Singer at Goodwill yesterday, bought it for a buck. Probably more pertinent to Baptist situations, though, would be I.B.Singer's Der Sotn in Gorey ("Satan in Goray"), which I have a photocopy of somewhere.

    Generally speaking, German Jews did not speak Yiddish; Yiddish is typically the language of the Jews of Russia, Poland, Lithuania and points South. Although it was once a mere dialect of German, it has had a separate literary existence since the 12th century.

    Haruo
    Yiddish-reading Baptist
     
  4. Gina B

    Gina B
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2000
    Messages:
    16,944
    Likes Received:
    1
    I need to look through the family history again. I know some came from Russia too, but I think she was from Germany. Now WHERE did I put those??? [​IMG]
    You speak Yiddish for real?
    Gina
     
  5. Haruo

    Haruo
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2003
    Messages:
    500
    Likes Received:
    0
    I said "Yiddish-reading" not "Yiddish-speaking" :D — although in Yiddish "redn" (which looks and sounds to the English speaker like it should mean "read") means "to speak" ;)
    "ikh red yidish" = "I speak Yiddish"
    "tsi retstu yidish?" = "Do you speak Yiddish?"

    I don't speak it much, but I read it fairly often (pick up a copy of the "Forverts" every few weeks and read all the news that's fit to print in Yiddish). And I have a small webpage in it, at http://www.geocities.com/lilandr/lingvoj/jida/index_yi.html (under rather sluggardly construction). I'll be adding some Baptist info in Yiddish there eventually. (There's a dearth of information on Baptist topics in that language, beats me why. ;) )

    Haruo
     
  6. Ben W

    Ben W
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2002
    Messages:
    8,868
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hopefully they will find peace, and a life free from hatred and violence.

    Hopefully the churches in Germany use the opportunity to tell them the good news concerning Yashua.
     
  7. Jim Ellis

    Jim Ellis
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    Messages:
    111
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've heard that anti Semitism is on the rise in Europe and in Germany even worse! I hope they do well :(
     

Share This Page

Loading...