July - Reading 10

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Clint Kritzer, Jul 10, 2002.

  1. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2001
    Messages:
    7,739
    Likes Received:
    4
  2. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2001
    Messages:
    7,739
    Likes Received:
    4
    Good evening -

    In 1Chronicles today we see more text that is unique to the Chronicles. David prepared for the building of the Temple not only with material goods but he also planned for the administration and overseeing of the building as well. One note of interest is that the Levites were not included in the count of the fighting men that angered God, but yet they are numbered here for the benefit of the manning of the Temple. This information was probably very beneficial to the leaders of the Jewish people in that at the time of the writing of this document, they may have been in the midst of a similar organization for the return from exile.

    We also read tonight Luke’s account of the Transfiguration. It seems to be the general consensus among Biblical scholars that Moses represents the Old Testament Law, Elijah represents the Prophets and Christ stands among them as the fulfillment of both. The fact that the Disciples in attendance wanted to build altars for them may have been due to their desire for these important figures to remain longer, but Christ was on a very tight schedule now as His death is immanent.

    We also began a new Epistle this evening, 1Thessalonians. Many scholars believe that this was Paul’s very first Epistle chronologically. We see in the Book of Acts that Paul and Silas fled Thessalonia very quickly and had to leave a newly established church with little support (Acts 17). We see in chapter 3 of this Epistle that Timothy was sent back to this church after a time and later sent this Letter to explain and comfort the people on the return of Christ and the fate of those who died before that return. Every chapter in 1Thessalonians ends with a comment on the return of Christ and as a result, this Epistle is often referred to as “Eschatological Letters” of Paul.
    Thessalonia was the largest city in Macedonia at the time and was at the head of the Thermaic Gulf. The congregation was primarily Gentile though some Jews may have been in attendance as well (Acts 17:1-9, 1Thessalonians 1:9-10).
    In the first chapter of the Epistle we see that there was no question of the desire of the people to be joined into the Christian Body and their faith was very evident. I like the reference in verse 6 to imitators. The Thessalonians imitated Paul and his companions as Paul imitated Christ, who told us to imitate the Father.

    May God bless you

    - Clint
     
  3. rsr

    rsr
    Expand Collapse
    <b> 7,000 posts club</b>
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2001
    Messages:
    10,073
    Likes Received:
    101
    How often do we as Christians insist on talking or doing instead of listening? I think this is related to the visit to Lazarus' house, where Martha insisted on work when May sat and listened to Jesus. Sometimes the good drives out the best?

    And it's interesting that only three disciples were invited. Why do you suppose that is?
     
  4. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2001
    Messages:
    7,739
    Likes Received:
    4
    Sunday School lesson 10/31/04 - continued

    Luke 9:28-36 The Transfiguration

    Mark states that the Transfiguration occurs six days after the confession while Luke says about eight days. In both instances we can interpret the phrase as a bout a week. The point is that this event occurs in close proximity to the Passion statements of verse 22 and 43-45.

    The three Disciples chosen to ascend the mountain with Christ to witness this event are Peter, James, and John. These same three are noted by Mark as being present at the agony in Gasthemane. It is obvious that hey constituted some type of inner circle amongst the Twelve.

    While we associate the term "transfigured" as stated by Mark with this account, Luke describes Christ as having an altered countenance. This may be due to Luke's awareness of the pagans that surrounding the Christian community who used the word "transfigured" to describe pagan gods changing appearance at will. In any case, it is that this crux that the three Disciples get a glimpse of Who Christ truly was. Up until this point He was perceived as a Galilean Jew, a peasant who was merely a man. Now He was seen in the Glory that He possessed. His real identity was projected in the sight of three witnesses.

    Moses and Elijah likewise do not revert to human form as they were already in the presence of God and so they appear also in glory. Both of these figures were already associated with the messianic age and played an integral part in the plan of salvation. Luke reveals to us that the nature of the conversation dealt with Jesus' departure, His death or literally, His exodus. The fulfillment of the Law and the prophets was the necessary gateway to glory.

    To the Disciples, the Transfiguration would be assurance and confirmation of their confession. Though they were heavy with sleep, this glimpse at Jesus' true nature would serve as a confirmation of their faith, fleeting as it may have been. Peter's wish to build three booths (KJV - tabernacles) may be viewed as a rejection of Jesus' teaching about suffering. He wished to maintain the glory being displayed without the coming Passion and death.

    The cloud is a common reference in the Old Testament with the presence of God. It is this presence that inspires the fear displayed by the Disciples. Though it is not clear in the text, we can assume that it is the three transfigured persons who enter the cloud, not the Disciples. Just as at the conclusion of the Baptism which marked the true beginning of Christ's ministry, an affirmation of Jesus role comes from the cloud in the form of a voice. Jesus is called the Chosen and the Disciples are instructed to "listen to Him" just as the people had been instructed in the time of Moses (Deuteronomy 18:15).
     
  5. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2001
    Messages:
    7,739
    Likes Received:
    4

Share This Page

Loading...