July - Reading 24

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Clint Kritzer, Jul 24, 2002.

  1. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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  2. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Good evening once again–

    The folks who designed our reading schedule seem to want to make sure that we get through 2Chronicles tomorrow and as a result we had a lot of reading today. The main focus for today was on Hezekiah and the re-establishment of the Passover feast. The capture of the Northern Kingdom has come to pass (amazingly this goes without mention in 2Chronicles) and the few tribes that escaped the initial exile are invited to join the celebration of the feast of Unleavened Bread. One of the most important things to note about this passage is that Hezekiah was willing to make allowances concerning the Feast. First of all, he allows it to be delayed one month so as to allow the northern tribesmen time to get there (30:2). This also would have allowed ample time for the priest and Levites to consecrate themselves. Bear in mind that this would have been the first Passover celebrated by a unified Israel in over two centuries. It’s easy to overlook the passage of time in these Biblical accounts!
    Secondly, in verse 18 &19 we see that another allowance was made concerning the Levitical Laws in that people who had not been cleansed were still allowed to eat the Passover meal. This is very important in that it once again shows that the unity of the people was more important than the ceremonial nature of the Feast. The third delineation cited is that the feast went on for an additional seven days. There had not been anything like this Passover since the time of Solomon.
    Chapter 31 also continues the similarity of Hezekiah’s reign to that of Solomon. Compare verse 31:2 to 8:14 and you will see the echoes of the past regime. Also, once Hezekiah makes his own offering to the Temple in verse 3, the people follow suit very willingly. This is amazingly similar to the account of David’s offering in 1Chronicles 29:3-9. Verse 16 may be another copyist’s mistake in that traditionally the age of 30 was required before ceremonial duties were required. Three seems a bit young by any standard.
    The battle, or lack thereof, with Sannacherib in chapter 32 is mentioned in the Book of Isaiah as well as the Book of 2Kings. 2Kings 18:14-16 are omitted to keep in line with the very positive portrayal of Hezekiah by the Chronicler. The beefing up of the battlements would have been standard operating procedure for a city that expected a siege, but I believe the Chronicler adds these details to send a message to his audience. The rebuilding of the walls was an important part of Nehemiah’s mission.
    The next monarch of Judah, Manasseh, is predictably evil. Despite the massive religious reforms instituted by Hezekiah, the king and the people soon forget and fall back into paganism. Remarkably, Mannasah’s reign is the longest recorded in the Chronicles. Longevity was not always used as a reward in the eyes of the Chronicler. This was usually shown by military accomplishments and building feats, neither of which Mannasah enjoyed very good success.

    In our reading of Luke, what struck me as interesting is the question asked by Peter in verse 41. Christ often spoke to the crowds in parables but would explain things in a more understandable way to the disciples in private. Peter’s question shows that he wasn’t completely grasping what his Master was telling him. The confusion also shows that Christ was addressing all that followed Him. Remember from our previous readings that it was a large entourage that followed Him.

    In 2Thessalonians Paul’s final instructions to the church at Thessalonica is about idleness. As I alluded to in the last reading, many of the people at Thessalonica felt certain that Christ would return during their lifetimes. This left them with a feeling of apathy toward earthly work. Paul reminds them that even the Apostles worked when they were among the people. Idleness was not a desirable trait for the Christian community then just as it is not now. Even worse than just being idle, verse 11 shows us that they were meddling in other people’s affairs. Paul leaves off this passage with instructions to warn these idle brethren but to do so in love. A more accurate word for “warn” may be “admonish.” All church disciplining should be done in love, never in malice.

    May God bless you

    - Clint
     
  3. Aaron

    Aaron
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    Hello. Checking in. Still reading. Not much I felt to comment upon.
     
  4. ElizabethB

    ElizabethB
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    I'm still reading, too. [​IMG]
     
  5. rsr

    rsr
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    Same here.
     
  6. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Sunday School lesson 11/21/04 - continued

    Luke 12:35-40 The Unexpected Return

    Remaining on the theme of our future expectations and the priorities involved in such, Christ's teachings now turn towards answering the questions that arise during the interim. Disciples are not to become lazy or indifferent by the delay of the Second Coming. To the contrary, we are to remain ready. Our loins are to remain girded, the common Biblical expression for being prepared to move nimbly and quickly. Our lamps are to remain lit showing us what obstacles may be in the way and showing us the way to the door when He returns and knocks.

    The Master is shown as leaving a wedding banquet, the joyous celebration of Heaven and returning here to enter close fellowship with His servants. We see from this Passage that the same values will be in place as it will be the Master who serves. The Jews divided the night into three watches and Jesus uses that analogy to show that the return will be when God ordains it and for those that have not become lazy are gone to sleep, they will be blessed.

    Jesus then moves to a second analogy of a thief coming in the night to rob a home. The thief does not tell the homeowner when he will arrive. Instead it is necessary that the homeowner stay awake waiting for the thief and being on guard. So it is with His followers in the long night between His Ascension and His return.

    Luke 12:41-48 The Unfaithful Servant

    Regarding the previous instructions, Peter asks if they were meant for just the Twelve or for all followers of Christ. Jesus uses Peter's question as a platform to teach about abusive leaders. Peter did not know that he was merely the first watch for the fulfillment of the Kingdom. He did not know that many, many stewards of God's house, that is to say ministers, would follow after him.

    There are two requirements of a good steward, that he be faithful and wise. A good steward uses the goods entrusted to him as his Master wishes. The fool uses the goods as though they were his own. The good steward gains more responsibility.

    The fool who takes false security in the Master's delay in returning receives punishment. He mistreats the other servants and uses the goods entrusted to him for selfish ends. The punishment of that foolish steward is quite literally rendered in the KJV as "cut asunder" or cut in two.

    This Parable stresses the great responsibility of the religious leader. Greater knowledge comes with greater responsibility (James 3:1). The person who knows but does not do the Will of God is more guilty than the one who acts out of ignorance, thus his punishment is greater. He who guides the Christian fellowship into error commits a greater evil than the deceived who follow. Much has been given to the Christian leaders, much is required of them.
     
  7. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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