July - Reading 9

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Clint Kritzer, Jul 9, 2002.

  1. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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  2. rsr

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    The story in I Chronicles has always puzzled me.

    1. Why did God punish David for conducting a census? Was it that it was an act of pride for David to count his fighting men, putting his faith in them rather in the Lord?

    2. Why did God punish the entire nation for David's sin?

    3. If God is unchangeable, why did he repent from destroying Jerusalem. What is the lesson supposed to be?
     
  3. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    I believe the answer to this first query is that the counting of the people was indeed an act of pride on David's part. He already knew that his armies were fully supplied with troops and he knew of the assurance that God had given Abraham as to the children of Israel numbering like the stars in the sky.

    I also had the same question when we read the parallel account in 2Samuel 24 and I posted it in theology. You can find those folk's thoughts here: http://www.baptistboard.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=58;t=000715

    There is a possibility that God was angered by the support that the people had shown for the rebellion of Absolom and Sheba (see 2Samuel 15:12, 17:11, 24-26, 18:7, 20:1-2). Also it had been the people of Israel who had first called for an earthly king in contention of their One, True, Heavenly King only one generation before.
    For this account it shows us that David was willing to take full blame and responsibility for the people under his reign.

    I believe that it is the identical to the lesson learned in Jonah with the Ninevites. Prayer and repentance is acknowledged by God. The Lord always gives us a choice. Also, for this account it is important because it is at the point that the angel is stayed that David buys the property from Araunah and on which Solomon will build the Temple.

    [ July 09, 2003, 06:02 AM: Message edited by: Clint Kritzer ]
     
  4. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Good evening –

    As we continue our review of the history of the kings of Israel, the Chronicler has now moved into the parallels of 2Samuel 11 – 12 in his discussion of the capture of Rahab. The Chronicler assumes that the reader is familiar with the story in that no explanation of the events leading to David’s presence there is mentioned. In 1Chronicles chapter 21 we gain insight into the ambiguity of the sin that David committed in numbering the fighting men. We also learn of the resistance Joab had to such a plan. The Chronicler is much more theologically minded in his rendition of this account and even adds to the story the account of the angel causing the afflictions that were the punishment for this sin. We also gain more insight into the purchase of the site of the threshing floor purchased by David from Araunah that would be the place of the building of the Temple. We also learn in chapter 22 of David’s preparations for the building of the Temple. This information is all unique to the Chronicles. It is hard to decipher whether the conversation between David and Solomon concerning the building of the Temple is private or a public pronouncement but we do learn that David was somehow unfit for the construction of the Temple because of the blood that had spilled during his campaigns. The image of David is far more exalted in these accounts than in 2Samuel and 1Kings. None of the problems he incurred due to his adultery with Bathsheba are mentioned. This account simply progresses from David’s reign to Solomon’s.

    In Luke today we read the account of Peter’s profession. I definitely like the wording of Matthew better as it is so much more dramatic. The verse that really stood out for me as I read today was verse 26. We must not be ashamed of the Gospel or our faithfulness to it. It is very interesting that this is said after Peter’s strong affirmation of the identity and Deity of Christ. This same man will later deny Christ, perhaps out of annoyance, perhaps out of fear, perhaps out of shame.

    We finish our reading of Colossians today. The one note I would make on this final passage is that it gives many clues as to the time and the nature of the writing of this Epistle. Onesimus (v.9), Aristarchus, Mark, Epaphras, Luke, Demas, and Arcipas are all mentioned in Philemon. Also we see names echoing from the Book of the Acts and can refer back to specific passages as to the first mentions of these names. Aristarchas is mentioned in Acts 19:29 and 27:2. He and Tychicus are mentioned in Acts 20:4 as companions in Greece. Mark is said to have deserted him in 27:2 but they had evidently patched up things pretty well by this point as is also attested in Philemon 24. We also see that the Letter to the church in Collose is meant to be a circulating Epistle to the churches there in what would be present day Turkey. Finally there is the personalized signature which was a trademark of Paul’s Letters.

    May God bless you

    - Clint
     
  5. rsr

    rsr
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    This has been one of the most chilling and powerful verses of the Old Testament for me: I will not give the Lord that which costs me nothing; in other words, to be a proper offering to the Lord, it must cost me something. Spare change and comfortable piety cost me nothing, thus they are insufficient offerings.
     
  6. Clint Kritzer

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    That passage echoes the purchase of the original gravesight for Sarah by Abraham in Genesis. That purchase eventually led to the land in Canaan becoming the Jewish homeland.

    I appreciate you reading along rsr. [​IMG]

    [ July 09, 2002, 10:55 PM: Message edited by: Clint Kritzer ]
     
  7. Clint Kritzer

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    Sunday School lecture 11/30/03

    Colossians 3:18-4:18

    4:10-17 Greetings and Instructions


    Aristarchus, a "Dispersion Jew" is found with Paul in Acts 19:29; 20:4; and 27:2. He was a resident of Thessalonica. That he was a "fellow prisoner" is a little unclear. The phrase may mean that he was sharing Paul's imprisonment in the same way Epaphroditus did in Philippians. It could also mean that he was a captive of Christ but it seems a bit strange that Paul would only designate one of these brethren with this designation.

    Mark, or John Mark as we know from Acts 13:13 and 15:36-37 had separated from Paul over a dispute in ministry goals along with Barnabas. However, in this Passage we see that they are on very good terms. That Barnabas is mentioned with such familiarity suggests to some scholars that he may have actually been to Colossae.

    Jesus Justus is mentioned nowhere else in Scripture so all we know comes from these brief words. We know he was a Jewish Christian whose name means uprightness. That Paul mentions them all as "of the circumcision" implies that the controversy may have still been active at this point in time. That Paul mentions them as "for the Kingdom" is appropriate for these Jewish compatriots as the Messianic hope of the Jews was for the reestablishment of the kingdom of Israel.

    Epaphras who was commended early in the Letter will not be returning with the other two messengers. He is contrasted with the aforementioned brethren as "one of you," recognizing his Gentile lineage. The Colossian pastor had been in fervent prayer for his church. Our English does not fairly convey Paul's meaning in these phrases of fervency in prayer and toil in labor. It is more accurate if the reader imagine Gathsemane or Jacob wrestling the angel while reading the Passage. Paul makes it clear just as in the first chapter that this pastor had his full support and commendation.

    Setting him in the company of the other Gentiles mentioned, we learn more about Luke in these four words than from any other writing outside of his own. Paul is obviously expressing heartfelt gratitude toward the physician. A more literal word for word translation of verse 14 reads "Luke, the doctor, our friend."

    Demas who is also mentioned in Philemon 24 may be mentioned last because he was the amanuensis who penned the Letter for Paul.

    The brethren at Laodecia and Nympha and the church in her house remain a mystery to us. These were associates lost in time, but immortalized in Paul's Letter.

    There is much discussion about the letter from Laodecia. We have no record that Paul ever went to Laodecia yet throughout history forgeries and counterfeits have popped up claiming to be this article, assuming that Paul wrote the letter from Laodecia. 1Timothy 6:20-21 in the KJV mentions this but that postscript is generally viewed as an addition with no authority. It is far more likely that this was a letter that had been sent to the neighboring town but this still doesn't solve the riddle. Many feel that it was merely lost in time. Some scholars in the past identified it as Hebrews. Still others think it may be Ephesians, which bears a remarkable similarity to Colossians or perhaps even Philemon. In this modern day, the most widely accepted theory, if the letter still exists, is Ephesians.

    4:18 Signature

    As was characteristic of the Pauline Epistles, Paul signed the Letter in his own hand, taking the pen from the amanuensis. To remember his chains or bonds may be a request for prayer or an explanation of why he is not visiting them personally. The postscript found in the KJV is also viewed by most scholars as a much later addition made by copyists, though we accept the information as correct.

    So ends the brief but powerful Epistle to the Colossians. It is interesting to me that the Letter carries such a wide array of perspectives. Paul moves from his discourse of the cosmic Christ in chapter one to the philosophical debate of chapter two to the practical, everyday instructions of chapter three. In chapter four he brings the message back to the confines of his prison and the men that were there to support him. The final messages of the Book show us that the small local and home based churches of the first century were the humble vessels through which the Grace of a Cosmic, Creating Savior would be imparted to a spiritually starving world.
     
  8. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Sunday School lesson 10/31/04 - continued

    Luke 9:18-22 The Great Confession

    Since the beginning of chapter 8 and up until this point, Luke has been closely following his Markan source. He now, however, omits a large section of Mark often referred to as the "great omission." Whether by design or necessity we will never know but this omission brings the confession of the Disciples into close proximity with the perplexity of Herod and the Feeding of the Five Thousand. Indeed, we may view these four verses as the central theme around which the entire Gospel is written.

    Luke has focused a great deal on the fact that Christ prayed often and as the scene opens on this Passage we find Him once again in prayer. When the Disciples enter the scene, Jesus first asks them who the people said He was. They list a number of possibilities that perfectly match the list offered by Herod's speculation: John the Baptist, Elijah, one of the prophets of old.

    As noted earlier, this question, Herod's question, Jesus' question, has been asked for nearly 200 years. It is not a light question and it continues to hold the same significance as it did in the time of Christ. We live in a world of contrary opinions and doubt. Our faith does not exist in a vacuum and it is not sheltered. It requires reason and must be tested if it is to mature.

    But the time comes in every believer's walk when the question turns from the opinions of others and falls squarely into the responsibility of the individual. "Who is this about whom I hear such things?" The question is turned towards the Disciples.

    Acting as the spokesman for the Twelve, Peter demonstrates that they have moved beyond the perception of the people. Jesus is the Christ of God, Yahweh's Messiah, the Anointed One. This is the first time in Luke that someone other than the demons has acknowledged that they recognize Jesus for who He is.

    The confession is followed by a command for secrecy. Once again, we are left to ponder why this is. It is unlikely at this juncture that the Disciples would betray His trust before the appointed time for the Passion. Perhaps Jesus recognized that the term "Messiah" to the Jews carried connotations that did not match His mission nor even the Disciple concept of what He should be. This theory is supported by the confession being followed by Jesus terming himself "Son of man." This designation carries a double connotation from the Old Testament. Ezekiel often referred to himself as "son of man" meaning he was a mere mortal speaking for the Divine. Daniel, however, uses the term in chapters 7&8 of his Book to designate the one who would come in glory with authority and power. Daniel's vision, in context, references the apocalyptic nature of the Messiah rather than the nationalistic image embraced by the Jews of the time.

    It must have seemed quite contrary to the Disciples that Jesus would state then that the Son of man, the anointed of God, would have to suffer. His Messiahship would not be achieved through self-assertion, as we would naturally assume, but by humiliation. To arrive at glory through any other means would be satanic as Jesus demonstrated at the temptation (Luke 4:5-8).

    Luke 9:23-27 The Cost of Discipleship

    Belief in Jesus as the Christ is necessary but not adequate for becoming a true disciple. As James tells us and as Luke has witnessed, even the demons recognize Him for Who He is. Recognition and belief must be accompanied by allegiance and obedience. This allegiance requires that one "take up their cross." Though in the modern day we view the cross as a symbol of our belief, we must never forget that at the time it was the ultimate symbol of humiliation and pain. Luke adds that this taking of the cross must occur daily.

    The declaration we make of Jesus as the Christ of God must be accompanied by our public declaration of Who He is. The term "ashamed" in verse 26 carries the connotation of being unwilling to claim Him under economic, social or political pressure. The Disciple must remain steadfast in even the most trying situations.

    Verse 27 has led some to support a post millennial philosophy, but the context and our observations plainly demonstrate that to "see the kingdom" does not refer to the end times but to the manifestation of the Kingdom in the life of Christ.
     
  9. Clint Kritzer

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