June - Reading 7

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Clint Kritzer, Jun 7, 2002.

  1. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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  2. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Good evening -

    In our reading of 1Kings tonight we read of the decline of Solomon's reign of Israel. Despite his wisdom, Solomon disregards the instructions of God when the Jews first came back to Canaan. The taking of wives was a common practice in the Middle East in that time in that it sealed political deals, but Solomon had given himself over to the false god's of his pagan wives.
    As a result, the reading ends tonight with the dividing of the kingdom.

    In Luke we read the account of Simeon and Anna encountering Mary, Joseph and Christ at the infant's dedication at the temple. We learn here that it had been revealed to Simeon by the Holy Spirit that he would not die before he had seen the Messiah. Simeon is led directly to the Baby Jesus.
    It is interesting that the Gospel of Luke, despite its fine attention to detail makes no mention of the decree of Herod for the slaying of the first born nor the Magi.

    In Ephesians, Paul continues his lecture on the nature of the Christian Body to now expounding on the peace that should exist between us. One quick note: verse 4:9 is often used as a defense for the position that some hold that Christ descended to hell. An examination of the passage shows that this is more than debatable. The "earthly regions" do not refer to hell.

    May God bless you

    - Clint

    [ June 07, 2003, 11:01 AM: Message edited by: Clint Kritzer ]
     
  3. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    I made this statement last year with no explanation whatsoever. I'll quote a few explanatory comments on to it this year.

    Eph 4:9
    (Now that he ascended, what is it but
    that he also descended first into the
    lower parts of the earth?
    Eph 4:10
    He that descended is the same also
    that ascended up far above all
    heavens, that he might fill all things.)


    The "lower parts of the earth" quoted here is translated from three Greek words:

    lower - Strong's # 2737 - katoteros
    comparative from 2736; inferior (locally, of Hades):--
    lower.

    This term is used only once in the New Testament, here in this reading.

    Lexicon entry for katoteros

    parts - Strong's # 3313 - meros
    from an obsolete but more primary form of meiromai (to get as a section or allotment); a division or share
    (literally or figuratively, in a wide application):--behalf, course, coast, craft, particular (+ -ly), part (+ -ly), piece, portion, respect, side, some sort(-what).

    Lexicon link for meros

    earth - Strong's # 1093 - ge
    contracted from a primary word; soil; by extension a region, or the solid part or the whole of the terrene globe (including the occupants in each application):--country,
    earth(-ly), ground, land, world.

    Lexicon link to ge

    One will find commentaries that do support the notion that these "lower parts of the earth" are indeed hell. The argument, however, is at best weak. Hades is the Greek word denoting the netherworld, named for the mythological ruler of that realm, also known as Pluto. We find the term used 11 times in the New Testament, all of which you can find at this link. There are in fact three other Greek words that translate to "hell", none of which are found in this passage. You can find a source for these at this link: click here.

    Albert Barnes wrote a few comments on the use of the word "hades" in his commentary on Acts 2:27 and how the conception of the meaning changed over time.

    [ June 07, 2003, 02:16 PM: Message edited by: Clint Kritzer ]
     
  4. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Sunday School lecture 9/12/04 continued

    Luke 2:21-40 The Circumcision, Naming, and Presentation of Jesus

    Moving from the Lukan motif of the universality of God's gift of salvation through Christ to all men, the author now returns to another common theme in this Gospel: Jesus was delivered to mankind through the Jews. As prescribed by the Abrahamic Covenant, Jesus is circumcised on the eighth day. Again, as we see in 1:59, the naming of the child takes place at this time.

    The name "Jesus" is the Greek form of the name "Joshua" which means "the Lord saves" or “Yahweh is salvation.” The overtones of the name are given in Matthew 1:21 in that He would save the people from their sins. In the angels' proclamation he was called "the Christ", or "Christos", which is Greek for the Hebrew "Messiah". Both of these terms mean "the Anointed One". Jesus was the One anointed by God to save the people from their sins.

    In Mosaic Law a woman was to offer a sacrifice of a lamb and a turtledove or pigeon for purification after childbirth thirty-three days after the circumcision of a male child. If she could not afford a lamb, she was to substitute another dove or pigeon in its place. Leviticus 12 The fact that Mary had to offer two doves show that Jesus was born into a poor family. Though descendant of kings, both earthly and Heavenly, the Anointed One of God came to us through the most modest of circumstances.

    While in Jerusalem, we encounter two more characters in the birth narrative that have the Holy Ghost upon them: Simeon and Anna. Maintaining the theme of religious piety among the Jews, these characters are presented to us as earnest people expecting the consolation of Israel, or the comfort the Messiah would bring.

    Simeon's declaration in verses 29-32 is the fourth and final song of the birth narratives. This song is called Nunc Dimittis, again after the Latin translation, "you dismiss". The song once again indicates the fact that this Messiah was more than a hope for Israel, but was rather a hope for the whole world.

    In verse 39 we learn from Luke that Nazareth was the hometown of Joseph and Mary. Luke does not recount for us the return to Bethlehem nor the flight to Egypt as Matthew does. There is also no mention of the Magi. Instead we are taken to Galilee and are told of Jesus' early childhood that He was "filled with wisdom and the Grace of God was upon Him."
     
  5. Clint Kritzer

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