Luke and the Temple

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by Ben W, Mar 17, 2005.

  1. Ben W

    Ben W
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    Any particular reason why the Gospel of Luke begins and ends in reference to the Temple?
     
  2. Salty

    Salty
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    I dont understand the question
     
  3. Helen

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    Never noticed that before. Interesting! Thanks.
     
  4. Marcia

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    I never noticed that.

    It is an interesting case of symmetry, or a parallel. I think since poetic parallelism is so common in the OT, it's not strange to find this prose parallel in the NT.

    I think it shows the profundity and beauty of God's word. Nothing is left hanging and it all ties together.
     
  5. Artimaeus

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    If there is, I have never heard of one. That doesn't mean a whole lot because there is a whole lot that I haven't heard of.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. ituttut

    ituttut
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    Ben W I believe there could be a reason Luke begins and ends in reference to the Temple. Each writer has a story to tell as instructed by the Holy Ghost. We find the seed to start with, and before seeing the beginning to the end, we are shown all in-between, plus something that was hidden. Of course you may not agree, but this what I have been allowed to see, as I looked to answer your question.

    Matthew begins with the seed from Matthew to Joseph; Jesus’ surrogate Father, starting at King David. Matthew writes to the circumcised, emphasizing the Kingship of Jesus, presenting Him as the King of the Jews. Matthew ends with Jesus Christ having all the power of the King of heaven and earth, and a portion of the “great commission”. Where did this gospel come from and who started it, and when did it begin?

    In Mark we see the beginning of the gospel of John the Baptist of the kingdom is at hand, and the Jew is to repent and be baptized for the remission of sins. This gospel to the Jew ends with Jesus Christ confirming that this is still the gospel to be preached to the Jew, and also to the Gentile. Jesus told His Apostles in Matthew a parable of the fig tree, with a time limit of one year to accomplish bringing the house of Israel to accept Him, their King. He speaks of it here also. They were filled with Holy Ghost for this great task. His people did not believe the mighty works, or His Word. They rejected the Holy Ghost, the unpardonable sin. The great portion of the “great commission” is given here.

    Luke as you astutely ferried out begins by referencing Temple worship, and ending in Temple worship. Matthew shows the line of Kings through David and Solomon to Joseph, so Mary would have a husband to mate with later on, but more importantly for a religious civil ceremony to show to the world a certificate of marriage for all rights and privileges for she and Joseph, and her child, and then for their children. Luke shows by genealogy the line from David through Nathan to Mary, she a daughter of David bringing forth the Son of God, giving Jesus right to be the King of the Jews.

    Luke is not only a Doctor, but also a writer and historian. God used this man, who is on a par with Paul as far as intellect, to keep the record straight on the birth of Jesus the man of a young virgin woman, and presenting Jesus Christ the Son of God, the High Priest. Luke evidently talked to Mary, and God wanted a Doctor to write about this because of his knowledge of women, and paint the most vivid and beautiful picture of the birth of Jesus. Those of letters agree Luke’s Greek writing is outstanding. This is some man that God uses, I believe a Gentile, to give understanding of information he develops from sight and interviews as he informs in the first verses concerning Israel and then the bridge over to the Gentile. A Doctor, Poet, Historian, Author, and becoming a traveling companion of the one who gave him the gospel to enter into Body of Christ – Paul.

    Jesus has more to say about the gospel of the "great commission", and instructs they tarry for Pentecost.

    In Acts Luke leaves the Temple taking us from Jerusalem and Pentecost to Damascus Road, to Antioch and Christianity coming by the gospel Christ revealed to Paul, then on to Rome, with stopovers galore. The Gentiles will hear the gospel of the Grace of God that comes to us through Christ Jesus, as will some known to us as Jews.

    The gospel of John we find “In the beginning was the Word. We then find in the closing chapter John will “tarry”. John was the last Apostle to die for he was allowed to tarry. John closed out that century writing the Revelation. So John carries us from the beginning to the end.

    God also allowed John to tarry and confirm the gospel of Paul. John had to “tarry” for it was necessary for Paul to preach and write giving understanding to what Jesus had said on earth, but no one could understand. Jesus tells us this very thing. John 3:12-17 If I have told you earthly things, and ye believe not, how shall ye believe, if I tell you of heavenly things? 13. And no man hath ascended up to heaven, but he that came down from heaven, even the Son of man which is in heaven. 14. And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up: 15. That whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have eternal life. 16. For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. 17. For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.

    Thanks for bringing your observation to our attention. Christian faith, ituttut
     
  7. Craigbythesea

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    Ben wrote,

    Yes. Zacharias was in the temple when he received his vision, and after Christ rose from the dead his disciples were continually in the temple praising God.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. 4study

    4study
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    Something else interesting:

    Begining of Luke - Old Testament temple function.
    End of Luk - Those in New Testament relationship worshiping in Old Testament temple.
     

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