Luke by Bock

Discussion in 'Books / Publications Forum' started by swaimj, Jul 8, 2001.

  1. swaimj

    swaimj
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    I am reading this commentary in prep for a class I am taking in the fall. Seminary friends have recommended it highly and after reading about 100 pages, I concur. It is HUGE and THOROUGH--about 2000 pages worth. The author is darrell Bock.
     
  2. Pastor Larry

    Pastor Larry
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    Most complete commentary on Luke available IMHO. I have both volumes. I like the BECNT series of which this is a part. I also have the volume on Romans by Schreiner. The format is excellent, the writing is good, and the exegesis is well argued for whether you agree with it or not. I am looking forward to more volumes being published. I think BECNT is actually the new volumes of what used to be the Wycliffe Exegetical Commentary series. Perhaps someone else knows for sure.
     
  3. Chick Daniels

    Chick Daniels
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    Yes Pastor Larry, the BECNT took over the Wycliffe series from Moody Press. Unfortunately, they did not pick up the Romans commentary by Moo (now published by Eerdmans in the NICNT set) and did not pick up the Revelation commentary by Thomas. The first volume in the BECNT was actually Philippians by Moises Silva in 1992, but that is now apparently out of print. I also love BOCK's commentary, but actually prefer Moo as slightly better than Schreiner on Romans. The BECNT is certainly a commentary set to watch. It promises to be the most conservative, and yet exegetically exhaustive set in print. Less exegetically exhaustive but well worth possessing are the Pillar Commentaries by Eerdmans.

    Chick
     
  4. Pastor Larry

    Pastor Larry
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    I do think Moo is the better commentary on Romans as far as content. But I like the layout of the BECNT better than the NICNT/OT. I like the paragraph summaries, the shaded portions that make things stand out. I don't like their limited use of footnotes however. I do have a couple of volumes from the PNTC. They are less complete but sound. I like it as well though I have not used them as much.

    Are you familiar with the Exegetical Guide to the Greek New TEstament? It was going to be a technical exegetical series but so far as I know the only volume that got published was Murray J. Harris on Colossians and PHilemon. I like it a lot as far as digging into the text. It doesn't have a lot of either historical discussion or application but for the Greek text, it was the best thing I ever used. I wish they would publish more of them.

    [ July 20, 2001: Message edited by: Pastor Larry ]
     
  5. Chick Daniels

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    Yes, I am familiar with it, but the Exegetical Guide series apparently is a one author series, and Murray Harris is now retired, and I have heard no rumblings of another volume forthcoming.

    Best wishes,

    Chick
     
  6. swaimj

    swaimj
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    Another series that sounds similar to the exegetical Guide you mention is a series called "An Exegetical Summary of..." I have one on i & II thess. It is a guide for translators which goes through the text and spells out the major translation issues and the prominent solutions to them, summarizing the arguments. It does not state a preference, but only gives options. I am not sure how many of these have been published but there are several. The series is published by the Summer Institute of Linguistics.
     

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