Mennonite, Anabaptist, Amish, Baptist

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by Sminasian, Sep 19, 2012.

  1. Sminasian

    Sminasian
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    I realize there are many answers to my question, and many opinions.
    However, I trust my baptist believers and wouldnt think of asking anyone else to explain these faiths to me.

    So I am asking you, in a few simple sentences, to explain these faiths, and how they differ from us baptists
     
  2. Oldtimer

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    First, please define "us baptists", so as to have a basis of comparison for those you listed in the title of your post.
     
  3. Crabtownboy

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    Anabaptist [those who baptize again] include, Amish, Brethren, Hutterites, Mennonites and to some extent the Bruderhof Communities. They grew out of the radical reformation in the 16th century.

    And hold to the following beliefs:
    Bible as the sole rule of faith and practice – the authority of the Scriptures
    Freedom of religion – liberty of conscience
    Separation of church and state
    Pacifism or nonresistance
    Separation or nonconformity to the world
    Voluntary church membership and believer's baptism
    Evangelistic zeal
    Priesthood of all believers
     
  4. Salty

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    Crab, would you say these groups still have evangelistic zeal? Some of the groups, especially the Amish seem to have very closed communities?
     
  5. Crabtownboy

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    Some are fairly closed, others are not and are evangelistic. Some, like the Hutterites are communal.
     
  6. abcgrad94

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    I've known Mennonites and Anabaptists, and without fail they were very closed in order to keep away from ungodly influences. There was no outreach except some literature placed in their store (Mennonite) and the Anabaptists only did street preaching to try to convert people. Neither method was successful in reaching others.
     
  7. ktn4eg

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    While I cannot speak as an absolute authority on them (because I'm not!), but, very similar to the Baptists, there are several varieties of Mennonites within the camp. [Maybe that's an "Anabaptist" practice as well!!]

    Case in point, I grew up in an area that had what we referred to as the "New" Mennonites. This expression of "New" (as contrasted from those who we called "Old" Mennonites) developed soon after the US War Between the States. (I believe it was in either 1867 or 1868).

    A study into why there was a split within the Mennonite ranks revealed that one of the principal reasons that was given for this split occured over the "burning issue" whether or not it was "Scriptural" for men to wear coats with buttons!

    You see, the use of buttons developed in the Napoleonic Wars period of the latter 1790's - early to mid-teens of the 1800's. It would have been (and, indeed, was) easier for a man in the army or navy to don his shirt and/or coat if it were fitted with buttons than it would have been had it been fitted with "hooks and eyelets."

    Thus, at least to the Mennonites, buttons identified the wearer to be "pro-military," regardless of whether or not the particular wearer was indeed "pro-military" or not (i.e., guilt by association [Which, apparently, IS an {ana-}BAPTIST tenet, e.g., long hair on a man automatically associated you as one of those "godless" hippies back in the late 1960's - early 1970's; whereas today baldness on a young man now associates you as being pro-gay; and then, if you go back to the late 1800's - early 1900's, it was thought to be "scandal" for a young woman to go so far as to expose her ankles, NOW it's considered to be acceptable so long as she doesn't expose herself above the knee {which usually about 12" or so above one's ankle}]). At least they're consistent in their inconsistencies---judging primarily according to appearance---which, if I'm not mistaken, some One in the Gospels said something about (Who was that Man?).

    So, soon after the War Between the States was over, the group we referred to as the "New" Mennonites, split over that (& perhaps some other very minor issues), but did retain most of the other Mennonite tenets: pacifism (or as they termed it, "non-resistance") being one of them.
     
  8. tehillim119

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    Mennonites and Amish define the act of baptism as pouring water over the head. They also do not believe in eternal security. Ministers are chosen by lot.

    Nonresistance would be a denominational priority although some do in fact sue over things such as renting a barn, etc. and then not paying for it and then not returning it.

    They generally have a statement of faith and practice that would include how to dress, whether or not certain things like internet, etc are allowed.

    I know many mennonites, so fire away with your questions.
     
  9. saturneptune

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    I am not a Landmarker, but do believe some form of local church or small groups of local churches preserved the NT church during the period from Acts to the Reformation. Although no direct link, can you see a progression from the churches in Acts, to the early church groups, to the Anabapstists and others to modern day Baptists? That is very simplistic and no doubt the coming and going of groups is much more complex, but we know it was not the RCC, that was formed about 500 AD. Just interested in your opinion. Thanks.
     
  10. Michael Wrenn

    Michael Wrenn
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    You didn't ask for my opinion on this, but I have to say that I believe you are essentially correct. And I'm not a Landmarker, either.
     
  11. Oldtimer

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    Well said! :thumbs:
     

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