Mesquite Trees

Discussion in 'Health and Wellness' started by rdwhite, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. rdwhite

    rdwhite
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    If there is one thing that we have around here, it is Mesquite trees and lots of them. For years I've known that people like to grill and smoke with Mesquite wood, but I had no idea of the other benefits. For those interested in natural living, this tree is a goldmine.

    My wife is making syrup from the beans and plans to make jelly and sugar. I roasted the beans and made coffee and flour. The leaves can also be used to make a tea. The thorns can be used for awls and needles. There are many more uses documented at the website below.

    http://desertusa.com/mag99/oct/papr/oct99_lil.html
     
  2. Roy

    Roy
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    Well, I clicked on the link and looked at the web site and was fascinated with it. Many moons ago, when I was in the Army, I was stationed at Ft. Huachuca, Az., but also did some temporary duty at Ft. Bliss and White Sands. I saw hundreds, maybe thousands of mesquite trees and never knew if they were good for anything.

    The American deserts are really fascinating places to visit. I enjoyed the cool evenings in the middle of summer.

    Roy
     
  3. Gina B

    Gina B
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    Well shoot! I just looked and it doesn't grow in my county, although it grows in the one above us and in a county off to a corner.
    That would be an awesome source of free goodies! Maybe I can make it grow here. :thumbs:

    I've seen those pods before and wondered what in the world they were! It's so neat, how God provides all this stuff, and kinda sad that most of us have no clue what we're surrounded by unless we're in Wal-Mart.
     
  4. rdwhite

    rdwhite
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    The plants of the desert, and here in Thorn Brush country, were provided by God with numerous beneficial uses. Mesquite is just one of many plants and it will probably grow quite well in your area, just don't over water it. Besides mesquite we also have purple sage and aloe vera that are native to our area.

    The local Mexicans taught us to make a tea from the sage leaves. It is used to heal a cough from seasonal illnesses. We use raw aloe sap to treat burns, abrasions, and diaper rash. I can't remember the last time we bought a cough medicine, burn cream, or rash cream.
     
  5. gb93433

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    Those trees make some great lumber too. It is rather expensive. There is also an organization that promotes it use. It is called Los Amigos del Mesquite.
     
  6. Benjamin

    Benjamin
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    Living in the AZ desert I am very familiar with Mesquite and have several growing on our property. I save pieces when I prune for Bar-B-Q, it is great! The coyotes certainly eat the seeds but I fail to understand them getting much benefit because the seeds seem to come out very much like they go in, but I’m sure there must be a reason. I often find undigested black beetle/Mesquite droppings from the coyotes. I’ve tasted them before (the seeds not the droppings…lol) and they taste okay but are very hard and don’t soften in your mouth.

    I also keep aloe vera plants and will break off a piece and rub it where I’m beginning to sun burn.

    The wood is narrow and short which makes if difficult to build cabinets out of but is pretty and rather exotic looking. I once make an entertainment center out of it using a zigzag pattern on the doors.
     
  7. gb93433

    gb93433
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    Short yes, but I bought Mesquite lumber in Texas that was 9-12 inches wide and seven feet long.
     

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