Mindless trivia questions

Discussion in 'History Forum' started by Matt Black, Apr 23, 2004.

  1. Matt Black

    Matt Black
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    Ok, these have bugged me for years and no-one was ever been able to satisfactorily answer them:-

    1. Why the difference in pronunciation between Kansas and Arkansas?

    2. Why is the Republican Party known as the GOP, since the Democratic Party is older?

    3. Why is the Democrat symbol a donkey and th Republican an elephant? Where does that come from?

    Yours in Christ

    Matt
     
  2. Debby in Philly

    Debby in Philly
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    The donkey and elephant come to us from Thomas Nast, the political cartoonist who also gave us the modern Santa Claus.
     
  3. Matt Black

    Matt Black
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    Thanks, but why those animals for the two parties?

    Yours in Christ

    Matt
     
  4. Debby in Philly

    Debby in Philly
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    Here's the elephant story:

    The elephant has been a symbol of strength since Roman times. Its first use by the Republican Party is believed to date from a printer’s cut (pre-made pictures kept ready to use as illustrations when needed) of an elephant used by an Illinois newspaper during Abraham Lincoln’s 1860 presidential campaign. Thomas Nast was a staunch Republican, and he deliberately chose the elephant as a symbol for his own Party because of the animal’s great size, intelligence, strength, and dignity. It first appeared in his November 7, 1874 cartoon, “The Third Term Panic,” which was a comment on fears that Grant would run for a third term as President that led some Republicans to vote with the Democrats. Nast continued using the elephant thereafter, and gradually it became the Republican icon as it was adopted by other cartoonists.

    SOURCE
     
  5. Matt Black

    Matt Black
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    Cheers! And the donkey?! It doesn't sound like the most promising of animals to have as a party mascot!

    Yours in Christ

    Matt
     
  6. Debby in Philly

    Debby in Philly
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    And the donkey story:

    The donkey first appeared as a symbol for the Democratic Party in the 1830s when the Democrat Andrew Jackson was President. The donkey continued in American political commentary as a symbol for the Democratic Party thereafter. Thomas Nast built upon this legacy and used his extraordinary skill to amplify it. For a time, the rooster also served as the symbol of the Democratic Party, but gradually the donkey replaced it in popular usage after the 1880s. Nast first used the donkey as a symbol for the Democratic Party in "A Live Jackass Kicking a Dead Lion" published January 15, 1870, in Harper's Weekly to comment on Northern Democrats (nicknamed Copperheads) dealings with Edwin M. Stanton, Lincoln's Secretary of War.

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  7. Debby in Philly

    Debby in Philly
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    To quote the Democrats on the issue:

    When Andrew Jackson ran for president in 1828, his opponents tried to label him a "jackass" for his populist views and his slogan, "Let the people rule." Jackson, however, picked up on their name calling and turned it to his own advantage by using the donkey on his campaign posters. During his presidency, the donkey was used to represent Jackson's stubbornness when he vetoed re-chartering the National Bank.

    SOURCE
     
  8. Matt Black

    Matt Black
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    Thank you! And what about questions 1 and 2 in my OP?

    Yours in Christ

    Matt
     
  9. rsr

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    KANSAS VS. ARKANSAS

    Although the pronunciation of Arkansas, which follows the French, was settled by a legislative resolution, there is still no unanimity on whether residents are Arkansawyers or Arkansans.
     
  10. Daisy

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    Donkey? I always thought it was a mule.

    Oh well.
     
  11. Melanie

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    Great stuff here as well. can I ask why a Bull or Bear stock market?
     
  12. rsr

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  13. rsr

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    Debby said:

    The rooster lived on, at least in parts of the South, on paper ballots. A rooster was placed above the Democratic candidates, an eagle above the Republicans (what few there were.) That made it easier for illiterate voters to pick their candidates. "To stamp the rooster" meant to vote a straight Democratic ticket.
     
  14. rsr

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  15. Dr. Bob

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    1792 Democrat-Republican Party organized by Thomas Jefferson
    1832 Democratic Party organized
    1854 Republican Party organized

    1875 GOP = 'Gallant' Old Party
    1876 GOP = 'Grand' Old Party, adopted from the 'Grand' Army of the Republic (Union vets of Civil War)
     
  16. Melanie

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    Thank you rsr!
     
  17. Matt Black

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    Thank you all! But what about Kansas v Arkansas?

    Yours in Christ

    Matt
     
  18. rsr

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  19. Matt Black

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    Cheers!

    Yours in Christ

    Matt
     
  20. Bob Farnaby

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    Obviously a 'Nast'y cartoonist .. and astute poitical commentator ....

    Bob
     

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