Mishnaic Teachings

Discussion in 'Other Christian Denominations' started by Thinkingstuff, Jun 24, 2008.

  1. Thinkingstuff

    Thinkingstuff
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    I've been in discussion with Jewish people on another board about mishnaic teaching. It stemmed from a discussion of the law and where goyim fit into it. Finally we got into Talmud view of OT stories and Mishnaic teachings in the middle ages.
    I explained that I found that I was uncomfortable about mishnaic literture because it doesn't follow suit with older Jewish literature and was working on getting a reply to a question why I wasn't comfortable with it. Does anyone here have any thoughts about this topic. Preferably someone with some Judaic knowledge.
     
  2. BobRyan

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    As it turns out "Jesus was a Jew" and "Jesus had Jewish perspective" on the mishmash topic in Mark 7.

    There is a clear case where mishna teaching is being contrasted by Christ against God's Word -- the OT.

    Why not use HIS argument in that case?

    in Christ,

    Bob
     
  3. Gerhard Ebersoehn

    Gerhard Ebersoehn
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    Sound advice, BobRyan. May I suggest an even better source of departure for the same purposes? Try from the New Testament's perspective. We Christians ought to be the teachers to the Jews; not they to the Christians. Start with the Greatest Teacher, and make sure to end or better, conclude, with Him.
     
  4. billwald

    billwald
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    Ya sure, you betcha. No reason to conclude that the people who wrote the OT know anything about it.
     
  5. trustitl

    trustitl
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    The people who wrote the OT died a long time ago, a really long time ago.
     
  6. Linda64

    Linda64
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    Mishnah
    {mish' - nuh}

    General Information


    Mishnah, a Hebrew term meaning "repetition" or "study," is the name given to the oldest postbiblical codification of Jewish Oral Law. Together with the Gemara (later commentaries on the Mishnah itself), it forms the Talmud.

    Between 400 BC and the beginning of the Christian Era, the biblical laws (see Torah) were intensively studied, applied to new situations, and supplemented by traditions of popular observance and by precedents established by prominent leaders. This material, long transmitted by word of mouth and known as the Oral Torah, defined the meaning of biblical laws. After the fall of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Temple in 70 AD, the Jewish scholars and teachers called tannaim continued to elaborate and systematize the Oral Torah. About 200 AD, Rabbi Judah Ha - Nasi promulgated a collection of the most reliable traditions. This work, the Mishnah, became the official text out of which further Jewish legal development occurred.

    BELIEVE
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    The Mishnah consists of 6 orders (sedarim):

    * Zeraim ("Seeds"), treating agricultural laws;
    * Moed ("Seasons"), Sabbath and festivals;
    * Nashim ("Women"), marriage, divorce, and family law;
    * Neziqin ("Damages"), civil and criminal jurisprudence;
    * Qodashim ("Holy Things"), sacrificial cult and dietary laws; and
    * Tohorot ("Purifications"), ritual defilement and purification.

    These sections are divided into 63 treatises. The Mishnah includes some nonlegal material, notably the Pirke Avot ("Chapters of the Fathers"), a collection of wise sayings that forms the final treatise of the Neziqin.

    The rabbis cited in the Mishnah were regarded as more authoritative than those of succeeding generations, and they produced several other compilations of law and lore.

    Bernard J Bamberger

    Bibliography:
    T R Herford, The Ethics of the Talmud: Sayings of the Fathers (1962); The Mishnah (1931); H L Strack, Introduction to the Talmud and Midrash (1931); J Weingreen, From Bible to Mishna: The Continuity of Tradition (1976).

    http://mb-soft.com/believe/txo/mishnah.htm

    http://www.answers.com/topic/mishnah

    http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Judaism/talmud_&_mishna.html
     
    #6 Linda64, Jun 27, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2008
  7. Deacon

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    For your reading pleasure you should get Chaim Potak's book, The Chosen, a great little novel dealing with a conservative Jewish boy and a Hasitic friend.

    The Mihnah is a commentary, it was collected over centuries.
    There are lots of conflicting bits of wisdom within its pages.
    Arguing about it will be fruitless.

    As Christians, we see Old Testament history through the eyes of our Lord and Savior.
    Teach them truth.
    Use Peter's dream and sermons in Act's.
    Tell them about Paul's history as a Pharacitic persecuter then charasmatic preacher of the good news that the "goyim" were included in the promise.

    Rob
     
  8. Gerhard Ebersoehn

    Gerhard Ebersoehn
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    GE
    To be sure; more of them I'm sure, knew much better than most Christians nowadays or even ever! The new Jerusalem won't have one foundation or portal called after any Chritians except the twelve apostles maybe. That says a lot for Old-Testament Christianity. It had much less periphernalia than modern day 'christianity'. Wow, look at all the requirements to be counted worthy - its baptism, conversion, public confession, gifts galore, powers virtually almighty - I go back to that old time religion, it's good enough for me: I am your God; You My People: Finish!
     
  9. Gerhard Ebersoehn

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    It's ages the best I have enjoyed: "Pharacitic persecuter" (Is there a smiley with tears of laughter?) Oh, thanks, man, it's good!
     
  10. Gerhard Ebersoehn

    Gerhard Ebersoehn
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    One of the most spledid moments of my life: When I was in grade 10 my teacher who was marking my arithmetic exercises book, began raoring and folding with laughter. He took my book firmly with the left hand and like a karate champion drove his pencil through it, then swirled it until it turned like a shattered windmill in a storm, and unleashed it over the heads of the pupils, out of the window, they all by now also crying of laughter. The boisterous mirth kept on at least ten minutes, and I till this day pride myself of having given my class a laugh like they never had before or after - me, the most humourless wit in school!
     

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