Missions Sometimes Bad

Discussion in 'Missions / Witnessing / eVangelism' started by baptistcross, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. baptistcross

    baptistcross
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    I like them generally. They do wonderful work. I've done one myself. However, I remember last year when the Tsunami hit. We had some brothers and sisters trying to adopt kids into Christian homes even though they were Muslim. It honestly made me puke.

    There is a time and a place.
     
  2. cojosh

    cojosh
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2002
    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    0
    What's wrong with that?
     
  3. cojosh

    cojosh
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2002
    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    0
    What's wrong with that?
     
  4. Marco

    Marco
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    I was a Muslim once, my family still are. I have to admit that Baptist Cross has a point. It was wrong at that time for some Christians to take advantage of the Tsunami. Instead of just providing food and clothing (like some Christians were) they saw Indonesia as a religion grab. Some could say, what's wrong with spreading Jesus in a time of need? Well, the deal is most of those people were Muslim and it's hard to deal with somebody else coming in showing you food and yet talking about their Bible. It wasn't right in my opinion either.

    The reason the government finally kicked out these groups that were adopting kids in to Christians homes was because it was taking advantage of a situation in a time of crisis. There were a few Muslim groups (Islamic Relief, Red Crescent etc.)that could have taken the kids, but certain Christians made a point of getting to them first.

    The end does not always justify the means.
     
  5. bapmom

    bapmom
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2005
    Messages:
    3,091
    Likes Received:
    0
    But guys,

    we Christians are SUPPOSED to be the ones trying to help those truly in need! Giving them food and water at the moment they need it is of course necessary. But there were what....thousands? or millions?....of children orphaned after that tsunami. I remember hearing about it! So are you saying that since the prospective adopters were Christians they shouldn't have tried to make a PERMANENT contribution by taking in one or some of these children for the rest of their lives?

    This showed a bigger committment to truly helping the ones really in need than just giving some money. (Im not downplaying the need to give money, btw)

    What do you think happened to all those children who were orphaned? I imagine many of them are right now on the streets begging for food or shelter. I wish I could have done more in that area and if I could I would most certainly adopt a child in need. I would also hope that my brothers and sisters in Christ would not accuse me of making some sort of "religion grab".

    We OUGHT to be the ones on the forefront of offering aid and comfort in tragedies.
     
  6. chipsgirl

    chipsgirl
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2004
    Messages:
    2,832
    Likes Received:
    0
    I guess it all depends on your intentions. Is it truly for the child or because it makes the Christian feel better about themselves?
     
  7. Marco

    Marco
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    I said some Christian groups did this. In fact, other Christian groups even criticized the methods of these groups that did 'Make A Point' of taking Muslim children and placing them in Christian Homes. There were places that were Muslim or not religion affiliated that had adoption services in the area. These groups did not inform anyone, but did it behind the scenes.

    It's good children have a place to stay regardless. It's no good having kids without a home. My point is, this kind of methodology by some Christians in fact made people in the area question the faith, rather than consider it. This was a perfect time for Christians to show their best. As you know, they rarely have access to this area because of the government (95% Muslim).
     
  8. bapmom

    bapmom
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2005
    Messages:
    3,091
    Likes Received:
    0
    chips,
    then we'd have to determine that for every single set of adoptive parents out there. Im sure there are some where feeling better about themselves has at least a small part in their decision to adopt.

    Not to mention, the OP started out with a presumption that this is what missions is all about.

    Missions as defined here is not done through adoption. Baptist missionaries get the gospel out through church planting and good ole' preachin'. [​IMG]
     
  9. bapmom

    bapmom
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2005
    Messages:
    3,091
    Likes Received:
    0
    Marco,

    Im not arguing with you per se....just offering a different perspective. But don't you think that since 95% of the area is Muslim that a Christian group would have been frowned upon no matter what they were doing?

    They weren't allowing the Red Cross in there either, because of the cross in their symbol. And the Red Cross does not have ties with any Christian organization at all....they don't do any preaching or any sort of giving out the gospel even.

    Any adoption service that had Christian ties would have been immediately kicked out just for having Christian ties....Id rather believe for now that the people adopting the children were doing so for the best interests of the children.
     
  10. Marco

    Marco
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Hey, bapmom when you are right you're right.
    Anything the Christians did would have been looked upon with suspicion.
    It's just you got to put on your best game when you have a huge opportunity like this. It'll take another disaster before Christians can ever get access like this again.
    I just guess it makes me a tiny upset because when I lived in Jordan I never got a meal unless I said "We thank Christ for this meal" from some Christians. I know those in Indonesia interpreted no homes unless in Christian homes.

    Anyway, thank God I was saved. Muslims are the hardest to convert and I'm lucky.
     
  11. bapmom

    bapmom
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2005
    Messages:
    3,091
    Likes Received:
    0
    Marco,
    yes, I was glad when I read that about you, that you used to be Muslim I mean. I haven't met many that have come out of that.

    I understand why it would make you a bit upset then.....aid should be given to all who need it, whether they are of that person's religion or not.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. cojosh

    cojosh
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2002
    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    0
    I see. It's all about the motives behind the scenes. I guess one has to look at each situation individually. Some were working out of love and some thought they were.
     
  13. John of Japan

    John of Japan
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2005
    Messages:
    12,219
    Likes Received:
    194
    Baptist Cross, where did you learn about this incident? I never heard about it, but then I'm over here in Japan. ;)

    If you heard about this incident through the secular press, ANY secular press, I would doubt it. The world's system never gets it right when they talk about Christians. [​IMG]
     

Share This Page

Loading...