Moderate Calvinism

Discussion in '2000-02 Archive' started by Karen, Apr 13, 2002.

  1. Karen

    Karen
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2000
    Messages:
    2,610
    Likes Received:
    0
    Here are excerpts from an article that appeared in the OK Baptist Messenger on January 31, 2002. The author is Alan Day, pastor of FBC, Edmond, OK.

    "Hardly anyone is happy with the term, "moderate Calvinism". To some strict Calvinists, it has the same logical value as "slightly pregnant"....
    The term is not of recent origin, however.....
    In 1861, an article appeared in Bibliotheca Sacra on this subject. The author, Withington, wrote:..."Now moderate Calvinism consists not in denying any one of the great doctrines, but in mixing them with other truths, equally obvious and equally important."....Francis Wayland...wrote: "As you say, I can discover no point of what I suppose to be Calvinism which is not abundantly taught by Paul. And yet I am a moderate Calvinist. The sharp angles of Calvinism, which need to be filed and hammered out in order to make a system, I desire to hold no opinion about. It seems to me that the fault of all theological systems arises from logical sequences drawn from some revealed truth."....

    Article 5 of both the 1963 and 2000 Baptist Faith and Message are titled, "God's Purpose of Grace." The articles are identical, word for word. They treat two issues, election and the saint's final perseverance. Election is described as "the gracious purpose of God, according to which He regenerates, justifies, sanctifies and glorifies sinners. It is consistent with the free agency of man, and comprehends all the means in connection with the end." There is no speculation about whether election is "unconditional" or is based on divine foreknowledge. Neither here nor in the rest of the confession is there a consideration of the "extent of the atonement" or the resistibility of grace. In other words, the treatment is non-speculative and allows for differences of opinion on these non-essential matters.
    Thomas Armitage said of the great John Leland, "He was a Calvinist, but would not be bound by the methods of Gill; neither did Wesley or Andrew Fuller suit him; and for practical purpose, he thought that two grains of Arminianism with three of Calvinism made a good proportion in preaching. He says that one time he was preaching when his soul got 'into the trade winds,' and when the Spirit of the Lord fell upon him, he paid no attention either to Gill or Fuller, and five of his hearers confessed Christ."
    Moderate Calvinism is not an inaccurate term to describe confessional Baptist theology for the past 100 years at least. The 2000 BF&M continues that tradition."

    Karen
     
  2. Chris Temple

    Chris Temple
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2000
    Messages:
    2,841
    Likes Received:
    0
    Karen:

    "Moderate Calvinism" is like being a little bit pregnant: its not possible. I never met or read a moderate calvinist who was not in faith and practice a regular Arminian. Those who are not full-fledged Pelagians feel they can call themselves moderate calvinists because they hold (antithetically to the rest of their theology) to the preservation of the saints. And even this belief is in error as they believe their own faith preserves them rather than the grace of God.

    Moderate Calvinism was articulated in Geisler's book Chosen But Free; James White beautifully showed the unbiblicalness of it in The Potter's Freedom.
     
  3. Kiffin

    Kiffin
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2001
    Messages:
    2,191
    Likes Received:
    0
    "Moderate" Calvinism I don't think exists. Lutherans are the closest to that theology but you certaintly couldn't call them "Moderate" Calvinists. There may be Evangelicals with Calvinist leanings but generaly speaking you are either a 5 point Calvinist or not one at all.
     
  4. TomVols

    TomVols
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2000
    Messages:
    11,170
    Likes Received:
    0
    What about so-called "Amyraldianism" ? Some tend to believe that was the calvinism of Ryle, Strong, Bunyan, & Baxter, and is the calvinism of Erickson, Akin, et. al.
     
  5. rsr

    rsr
    Expand Collapse
    <b> 7,000 posts club</b>
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2001
    Messages:
    10,075
    Likes Received:
    102
  6. TomVols

    TomVols
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2000
    Messages:
    11,170
    Likes Received:
    0
    Very good links, RSR. One footnote seemed to indicate that Spurgeon had Amyraldian leanings, which has been stated before. BTW, I think John Piper has been categorized in this strain has he not?

    [ April 13, 2002, 07:16 PM: Message edited by: TomVols ]
     
  7. rsr

    rsr
    Expand Collapse
    <b> 7,000 posts club</b>
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2001
    Messages:
    10,075
    Likes Received:
    102
  8. Kiffin

    Kiffin
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2001
    Messages:
    2,191
    Likes Received:
    0
    Piper is a 5 pointer but it is true that Baxter was a Amyraldianism which Bro. Tom is correct is very close to Calvinist theology as is Lutheranism. Bunyan seems from his writings (Check out His writing on Double Predestionation called REPROBATION) to be a staunch 5 pointer.
     
  9. TomVols

    TomVols
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2000
    Messages:
    11,170
    Likes Received:
    0
  10. rsr

    rsr
    Expand Collapse
    <b> 7,000 posts club</b>
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2001
    Messages:
    10,075
    Likes Received:
    102
    Tom:

    Very interesting article. Unfortunately, it doesn't contain Piper's understanding of the verse that it criticized. Guess I'll have to find the book to read it ... ;)
     
  11. Chris Temple

    Chris Temple
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2000
    Messages:
    2,841
    Likes Received:
    0
    Tom:

    If its Amyraldianism, it ain't Calvinism ;)
     
  12. TomVols

    TomVols
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2000
    Messages:
    11,170
    Likes Received:
    0
    So would Ryle, Bunyan, Baxter, & Piper not be calvinists then? :cool:
     
  13. Chris Temple

    Chris Temple
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2000
    Messages:
    2,841
    Likes Received:
    0
    No, thay would not be Amyraldians!! :D
     
  14. jmbertrand

    jmbertrand
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Warfield treats Amyraldians under the heading of "inconsistent" Calvinists in The Plan of Salvation. Here is a portion of his critique. (He refers to Amyraldians as 'post-redemptionists' because of the placement of election within the order of decrees):

    This is from the final chapter of the book, available online at: The Plan of Salvation: Calvinism

    On 'moderate Calvinism': After hearing Norman Geisler on the radio explaining his 'moderate Calvinism,' it seemed to have more in common with some form of Wesleyan Arminianism, and did not seem to meet Warfield's criteria that Calvinists are particularists.

    Mark
     

Share This Page

Loading...