Moody Bible Institute

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by mjohnson7, Dec 22, 2006.

  1. mjohnson7

    mjohnson7
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2004
    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    0
    For those with earned docs or anyone in the academia circle, what is your view of MBI and their graduate school? I would be especially interested to hear from our more "reformed" brothers as MBI describes themselves in their catalog as historically being calvinistic and dispensational.

    I guess I would like to know what the opinion of the school is in the academic community at large. Are they considered conservative or liberal (I think I know the answer to that based on how they describe themselves and looking at the credentials of the faculty). What denomination or group is most represented there? Also, they have a distance program where one can earn a BS....why is it not recommended more on the board?

    Just curious!!

    Matt
     
  2. Rhetorician

    Rhetorician
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2005
    Messages:
    2,004
    Likes Received:
    1
    Bro. Johnson Response

    Merry Christmas to you my brother!

    What a great question? I can only answer from my very limited perspective.

    I was reared in a nominal SBC church. We had a "Bob Jones man" for a pastor. He was a great man who was untouched by the rancor of the mainstream "fundamentalists" camps. He was (is, he is about 90 now) a great personal soul-winner and faithful minister of the Gospel of our Lovely Lord Jesus. He was an extreme Dispensationalist with the charts and all to prove it.

    As I was growing up and toward the ministry as a layman, I "came into the Doctrines of Grace." Please don't think or take that the way I have described this as a new form of gnosticism, although some of my Calvinistic brethren have testified to such.

    I have said all of that to say; I cannot understand how anyone who is Reformed leaning can be a full-blown Dispensationalist? That seems like a "theological oxymoron?" But that is a case for another day and another thread.

    Secondly, at my home church under the "Bob Jones man" we used many-an Independent Baptist missionary. Many of them were MBI grads. They were all "sound in the faith" as anyone I have ever been around; even other BJU people, Sword-of-the-Lord John R. Rice people, Jerry Falwell Liberty U. people, and even the Jack Hyles types (wanabees). OOPS! Please forgive that slip of typos!!

    I took my Greek @ Mid South Bible College (now Crichton College in Memphis). One of my theology profs was a DTS grad (as were most of the Bible/Theology profs) and he left and went to teach at Moody. He has since gone to Bryan College (sp?) in Dayton, TN to teach. Great man, very knowledgeable. Just as a note of observation, MBI uses DTS grads in spades it seems.

    I too have looked at the MBI web page and find the grad programs look to be very strong. The MDiv(s) seem good, the MA(s) seem good; and all are based upon a very strong statement of faith.

    I have been so smitten with them; that I even applied for a job there teaching in the areas of Communications, Homiletics, Bible/Theology. But I received a "Thanks but no thanks" or "don't call us we'll call you" or "your 'gifts' don't fit our needs" letter of rejection. Wrong degree, wrong timing, or some such. I really do believe that the Sewanee degree and the Harding Grad School degree from outside the "conservative, fundamental, & Evangelical" circles may have spoiled the mix. Go figure!

    Any way, you wanted an opinion and I gave you mine!

    I too would like to hear back from (m)any who have had closer encounters w/MBI than me.

    sdg~:thumbs:

    rd
     
    #2 Rhetorician, Dec 23, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 23, 2006
  3. Broadus

    Broadus
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2004
    Messages:
    716
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Matt,

    Moody's doctrinal statement describes their beliefs as "noncharismatic, dispensational, and generally Calvinistic." "Generally Calvinistic" could be used to describe most evangelical colleges and seminaries. Believing in "eternal security" would probably qualify for the description.

    I have the same view as Rhet concerning the juxtaposition of Reformed theology and dispensationalism, though it is done, unless I'm mistaken, at places such as The Master's College/Seminary and Detroit Baptist Theological Seminary.

    Be that as it may, Moody is academically strong. I was not aware that they offer a completely DE B.S. in Biblical Studies. It would be a viable option, particularly for the older student with a family.

    Blessings,
    Bill
     
  4. exscentric

    exscentric
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2004
    Messages:
    4,182
    Likes Received:
    13
    I find there are two definitions to "reform" first there are the real reformed - five point calvinist and amillennial while there are those of the "reform" type that are five point calvinist and dispensational. The later being usually baptist and the former usually presbyterian.

    Reform is kind of like a lot of other terms, blurred by time and change.

    As for Moody, my son did some undergad work at the Spokane campus and was well pleased. I was told or read that the leadership put off getting into higher degrees and extension until they could do it right. They have had some correspondence courses for years, but just in recent years gone ahead with their extension program.
     
    #4 exscentric, Dec 23, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 23, 2006
  5. J.D.

    J.D.
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2006
    Messages:
    3,553
    Likes Received:
    8
    I've been looking at Moody's program. While they are a far cry from Westminster when it comes to reformed theology, they do however seem to be what I would call calvinist friendly. Erwin Lutzer of Moody Church is fully calvinist in soteriology and moderately dispensational, not unlike John McArther. Moody uses Erickson and Dever (calvinists) in systematic theology along with a non-cal text (I can't remember the name on that text).

    Their SOF is very neutral, allowing for different camps. Their enrollment policy is even softer.

    They're not exactly fighten fundies, but I wouldn't call them liberal either.
     
  6. Broadus

    Broadus
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2004
    Messages:
    716
    Likes Received:
    0
    For certain, there is nothing theologically liberal about Moody.

    J.D. wrote that "Moody uses "Erickson and Dever (calvinists) in systematic theology . . . ." Erickson I've read, and he is a moderate Calvinist. Who is the "Dever" who wrote a systematic theology? Thanks.

    Bill
     
  7. Broadus

    Broadus
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2004
    Messages:
    716
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree that the word "Reform[ed]" means different things to different folks, but I disagree with the statement that Baptist Reformed folks are usually dispensational. Perhaps that is true for independent Baptists who adhere to Reformed soteriology. but among Southern Baptist Reformed believers, not to mention denominations such as ARBCA and Primitive Baptists, most are historic premillennial and amillennial, while some are postmillennial and others hold to a dispensational premillennialism.

    I also recognize that if we continue this conversation, it will have to be moved to a theology forum :thumbs:.

    Merry Christmas to all,
    Bill
     
  8. PreachTREE

    PreachTREE
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2005
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0
  9. J.D.

    J.D.
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2006
    Messages:
    3,553
    Likes Received:
    8
    That should have been Grudem, not Dever. Thay also use Thiesson.
     
  10. EdSutton

    EdSutton
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    8,755
    Likes Received:
    0
    I believe you would mean the late Henry C. Thiessen, correct? I happen to have his book of Lectures in Systematic Theology, completed (or revised) after his homegoing by one John Caldwell Thiessen, whom I would guess was his son, and which has proved to be a worthwhile purchase from a used book source. I do so miss the used book sections of some that are no longer extant, but am happy to see some new sources in the days of the 'Net.

    Ed
     
    #10 EdSutton, Dec 31, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2006
  11. exscentric

    exscentric
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2004
    Messages:
    4,182
    Likes Received:
    13
    My Lectures in Systematic Theology is a first edition, that must make me older n dirt! :tongue3:

    Cambron had a book on doctrine that was small and readable as well. Bible Doctrine
     
  12. Rhetorician

    Rhetorician
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2005
    Messages:
    2,004
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ed Sutton Side Bar Reply

    Bro. Ed,

    I wonder if you know of Amazon.com, Addall.com, & Alibris.com used books. I just thought you might not.

    I know this is not on the OP and I hoped it would be a help not only to you but to all.

    sdg!:thumbs:

    rd
     
  13. EdSutton

    EdSutton
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    8,755
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can't really comment on your being "older 'n dirt", for we've never met, I don't believe. But I'm not particularly one to intrude on such, either. :smilewinkgrin:

    The late Dr. Mark G. Cambron was Vice-President, Academic Dean, and later President of the Florida Bible College, which I graduated from, and I had him as my teacher both for 'Bible Doctrine' and 'Hermeneutics', a total of 12 wonderful and informative hours, and we loved him (and "Miss Mary") dearly. :godisgood: :thumbsup:

    His best sermon or address was "Abide in the Land", IMO. He was one-time 'Prof.' & Dean, I believe, at Northwest Bible College, associated with Dr. W. B. Riley and Dr. Robert L. Moyer, if I'm not mistaken, then 'Prof.' & Dean at Tenessee Temple, before the FBC and Seaside days. He also founded and headed 'Seaside Mission', a ministry to the Jewish People, for almost 40 years. Dr. Cambron went home to be with the Lord on May 24, 2000.

    Ed
     
    #13 EdSutton, Dec 31, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2006

Share This Page

Loading...