Nationals Coming to America

Discussion in 'Missions / Witnessing / eVangelism' started by MikeinGhana, Nov 8, 2005.

  1. MikeinGhana

    MikeinGhana
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    One of the problems we American missionaries face working in a third world country is the fact that many people we meet would do just about anything to get a chance to go to the USA. (Even fake a salvation profession!) Some would go and return and be a blessing to their own people. Some would never return. Some think that America has money trees ripe for the picking.

    What do you have to say about nationals traveling to the States, for education, for jobs, for whatever?
     
  2. Mexdeaf

    Mexdeaf
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    I never encourage it. We have folks here who have asked me to teach then English or American Sign Language and I refuse to do it. I didn't come all the way down here and learn two new languages to make it easier for folks to go to the USA.
     
  3. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    This is a problem in a modern country like Japan, too. Sometimes they even go to a Bible school within Japan and never come back. That's why I feel it is important to have a local Bible school, and I don't recommend that they go to the States for Bible college if there is a better way.

    Having said that, I do know quite a few who have gone to Bible college in the U. S. and then come back. So our statistics are much better than a 3rd world country, I'm sure.
     
  4. MikeinGhana

    MikeinGhana
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    John, if I am correct about the ecomony in Japan, it is not suffering the way a third world poor counrty is. Am I right? I think the problem is that America is seen as a land of great opportunity, which it is. That is just too much of a draw for some. I have even known American men who went to Bible college with the full intent to follow the "effectual call" (Uh oh - don't start that again) for their lives in "full time" ministry. They start working their way through school, God blesses their efforts, and they never do get into the ministry. The love of money is a universal vice, not just in a third world country. What do you feel about that?
     
  5. Pastor KevinR

    Pastor KevinR
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    Our church here is vastly made up of immigrants from Guyana, Trinidad, Jamaica, Panama, and Bolivia. I've been told that in their native lands they serve God wholeheartedly, however, sadly many of them come to New York where "good money" can be made, even as "Child-care-provider" (formerly known as babysitter) and make $300.00 to $400.00 per week, and the lure is just too much for all too many. Although many of them are dedicated to the Lord's work, I see all too many who become too busy chasing the Almighty Dollar, instead of the Almighty God. It breaks my heart to see them at first serving God, but in time, they chase the old American Dollar. Sadly, many in this country are simply not the same in the lands from whence they came. [​IMG] We need a Revival.
     
  6. MikeinGhana

    MikeinGhana
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    Pastor KevinR

    I agree that it is the case many times over. I do know cases though where men have come to the USA, raised needed support, and returned to their country and had successful, God honoring ministries. Some come back and live way above the means of the people they ae trying to minister to. The love of money is a human vice, not just for those in the third wortld regions.
     
  7. Karen

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    But I think there is a fine line here. All of my ancestors were immigrants. America is a land of immigrants. It is ultimately an individual's decision on whether to move to improve his life situation.
    You all seem to be saying that if they were spiritual, they would necessarily stay where they were born.

    Karen
     
  8. exscentric

    exscentric
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    Similar problems have gone on for years. A church or two in NE sent a man that wanted to be a medical missionary through med school in the 40's. He finished school and returned to his home town and set up practice and pracitced for his life.

    At least they had a good Christian doctor :)

    Sure it is best if they return to their country to be pastors but at least they are trained and working even if they don't.

    Ain't like God can't get what He wants done in a country if one or two bail on Him. There is the other side, maybe they were honestly guided to stay in america by the Lord.

    Personal opinion is train them on the field as has been suggested, but that isn't to say they won't leave the country.
     
  9. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    Hi, Mike. Sorry about the delay--been meaning to answer you for days.

    You are right, Japan is a quite prosperous country in spite of their long recession (and the economy isn't getting better--the government just raises taxes). I'm sure the percentage of Japanese who go to America and never come back is much smaller than that of your country.

    Having said that, there are some real draws to America even for Japanese.

    (1) The freedom of America is very attractive. Japan is free on paper only. There is tremendous pressure in this society to conform, which is one reason so few become Christians. In America it is okay to be different, to be an individual, and the Japanese love that. I've never met a Japanese who had lived in America, even for a year, who didn't love it. It's like when you take a sponge out of the package and put it in water--it will never again fit in the package!

    (2) Even though Japan is prosperous, America has such tremendous abundance. The only thing you can find more of in a Japanese grocery is fish--and maybe even not then!

    (3) Japan is saturated with American culture, and the Japanese love it: movies, music, literature, etc.

    (4) For Japanese Christians, the morality of America is a draw. There is twice the abortion per capita in Japan. Again, the Japanese school system (despite the reputation they have foisted on gullible American educators) is full of abuse, bullying, immorality and violence. The culture is full of immorality, too (again, despite the image they have foisted on the gullible American public). For example, there was no enforceable law against domestic violence until very recently.

    (5) As you said, the lure of money is a cause, even in prosperous Japan. Most prices in America are only half what they are in Japan.

    So the upshot is, except in special cases I would not send a Japanese to America for education--they might not come back! :(
     
  10. gb93433

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    We have less foreigners coming to study at the universities now than just a few years ago.
     
  11. MikeinGhana

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    Please do not misunderstand me about this topic. I am not against all nationals coming to America. In fact I have helped some come over. What my problem is concerning this is for the missionary on the field. If it is known that he is involved with helping nationals come to America, he will have a line a mile long wiaiting for people to join his church or his school in order to get their chance to go. When the chance never comes there is trouble for that missionary.

    It is hard enough to discern who is genuine and who is not on the mission field. This just adds to this problem.
     
  12. John of Japan

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    I certainly understand what you are saying, Mike. Our problem in Japan is not as dire as yours, but it is very easy for a missionary here to get involved with the home stay crowd and teach too much English.

    I would much rather just reach the Japanese in their own country. I could easily teach English full time and make lots of money--I've known missionaries who did this--but I choose not to teach any English. I don't criticize missionaries who do, because you can make contacts that way. But I don't do it.
     

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