OK to shoot police officers in Indiana?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by billwald, Jun 13, 2012.

  1. billwald

    billwald
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    http://www.christianpost.com/news/indiana-law-to-shoot-police-a-recipe-for-disaster-video-76567/

    "Cops could be put on the other of the gun after a new law was passed allowing Indiana residents to shoot at an officer in order to protect their own property.


    "Indiana has become the first state to allow citizens to use force against police officers, according to the Association of Prosecuting Attorneys in Washington. The law was developed to enable citizens to protect their property in the case of an unjustified police attack. Some say it leaves to much room open for abuse.

    "Somebody is going get away with killing a cop because of this law," Joseph Hubbard, a 17-year veteran of the Police Department in Jeffersonville, told the San Francisco Gate. "If I pull over a car and I walk up to it and the guy shoots me, he's going to say, 'Well, he was trying to illegally enter my property.'"

    Other suggested that the law was in reaction to the dwindling professionalism within the police force.

    "I remember a time when I had respect for law enforcement, it has long passed," HandyMan wrote on the SFG blog. "How does it feel to be on the other side of the barrel good cop? Do your job and defend liberty and you won't have a *** thing to worry about."

    The law was pushed by the National Rifle Association, also responsible for the "Stand Your Ground Law" in Florida- a controversial aspect of the Trayvon Martin shooting."
     
    #1 billwald, Jun 13, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 13, 2012
  2. Bro. Curtis

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  3. HeirofSalvation

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    From the article...
    So far, this article is short on details...but Indiana is batting 1,000.

    The only obvious misrepresentation, was on the part of the no-doubt perfectly straight-forward cop:

    Whose intelligence is he insulting?? There is no way whatsoever, that the Indiana law permits this.....this cop is either an idiot....or he is intentionally mis-representing the content of the new law. It's not like Indiana just established a 3 month hunting season on police.

    When I was a child, my mother impressed upon me the notion that honest men have nothing to fear from the law.....ditto for cops.
     
    #3 HeirofSalvation, Jun 13, 2012
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  4. Robert Snow

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    I have never had a police officer break into my house or assault me. That doesn't mean they have all been boy scouts, but the one thing I do in dealing with the police is treat them with respect regardless of their attitude. If they were to overstep their authority toward me, I would get an attorney and see them in court. But, like I say, in my experience I have found that if I don't have an attitude, they don't either.
     
  5. targus

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    I think that this is a true statement.

    Is the OP author's concern here based on his personal experience in that area as a police officer?
     
  6. poncho

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    Americans have long maintained that a man's home is his castle and that he has the right to defend it from unlawful intruders. Unfortunately, that right may be disappearing. Over the last 25 years, America has seen a disturbing militarization of its civilian law enforcement, along with a dramatic and unsettling rise in the use of paramilitary police units (most commonly called Special Weapons and Tactics, or SWAT) for routine police work. The most common use of SWAT teams today is to serve narcotics warrants, usually with forced, unannounced entry into the home.

    These increasingly frequent raids, 40,000 per year by one estimate, are needlessly subjecting nonviolent drug offenders, bystanders, and wrongly targeted civilians to the terror of having their homes invaded while they're sleeping, usually by teams of heavily armed paramilitary units dressed not as police officers but as soldiers. These raids bring unnecessary violence and provocation to nonviolent drug offenders, many of whom were guilty of only misdemeanors. The raids terrorize innocents when police mistakenly target the wrong residence. And they have resulted in dozens of needless deaths and injuries, not only of drug offenders, but also of police officers, children, bystanders, and innocent suspects.

    This paper presents a history and overview of the issue of paramilitary drug raids, provides an extensive catalogue of abuses and mistaken raids, and offers recommendations for reform.


    CONTINUE . . .


    If you crash through my door wearing a black mask and carrying a German submachine expect resistance. Better to avoid all that. Get a warrant and knock on the door dressed like a cop instead of John J. Rambo. Oh yeah and knock on the right door.
     
    #6 poncho, Jun 13, 2012
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  7. billwald

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    >Is the OP author's concern here based on his personal experience in that area as a police officer?

    No. It is a new world out there. I would not take the job now for $100K starting salary. I'd rather clean bathrooms for a living if it was a union job.
     
  8. carpro

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    The police need to get it right or they could end up dead and the shooter would be within their rights...at least in Indiana.


     
    #8 carpro, Jun 13, 2012
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