On the Tombstone of Fundamentalism

Discussion in 'Fundamental Baptist Forum' started by Dr. Bob, Aug 8, 2010.

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  1. Dr. Bob

    Dr. Bob
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    "The Fundamentalist Movement assumed that the people in the pew were sheep to be led and not priests to be encouraged."

    Lots of truth in that. While some fundamentalists remain, the movement is summed up on its tombstone.

    Open for discussion.
     
  2. Salty

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    I find it amazing that a young 22 year old fresh out of some college, (say Hyles-Anderson) thinks he knows more than a 50 year member of the church he has just taken. Yes, he may have more formal book learning, but many times it is the experience that is more important.

    A smart young 21 year-old Army lieutenant is going to listen to the advice of his 35 year old Platoon Sergeant.
    That young preacher would be wise to do the same with the elders of his church.

    Also, often a preacher will say "My church"! NO,NO,NO, it is NOT his church - he is only the shepherd. He needs to learn the balance of leadership vs dictatorship.

    Yet in the long run The Fundamentalist Movement will survive because many in the pews want to simply be led- as they want no responsibility
     
  3. Dr. Bob

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    Good observation.

    Many Christians equate "following xyz rules/guidelines" with "spirituality".

    In reality, that is the "weak" Christian who is carnal, not spiritual.
     
  4. TCassidy

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    Fundamentalism is not dead. It is not even sick. It is alive and well and spreading all over the globe.

    Modernism and Theological Liberalism has not defeated the Truth and never will.

    The report of Fundamentalism's death is greatly exaggerated. :)
     
  5. Dr. Bob

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    Would not agree. Fundamentalism (the MOVEMENT) seems to have less and less impact and facing irrelevancy. Fundamentalists - men who hold to the fundamentals and defend them against liberalism, modernism and godless evolution - are still effective, but reduced in numbers.

    Why would you think the movement - now splintered and fractured and with false fundamentals added - would NOT be classified as "dying". We see its birth, growth cycle, maturity and now the death-throes.

    Interested in your perspective.
     
  6. TCassidy

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    Because God has promised us that His Truth will never die. The Gospel has the same sway it has always had. If anything, Modernism/Theological Liberalism is experiencing its death-throes, not Gospel truth. :)
     
  7. Tom Bryant

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    No one would disagree that the Gospel has the power it always had. The issue is about fundamentalism as a movement. They are different.

    I think it is now centered around which school a preacher or missionary has gone to and when. I am a TTU grad (81) but those graduating now are different than those who graduated in my time and before. Would they call themselves a fundamentalist, probably. But they are different.

    The Sword of the Lord used to be the uniting factor, but it, to me, has ceased to be the one that always called us to soul winning, revival and evangelism.
     
  8. SolaSaint

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    I was unaware that there was a Fundamentalist Movement. Was this a specific movement like the WOFers or Calvary Chapel, or are you saying that it was an unspecified movement as the result of legalistic teaching?
     
  9. Eagle

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    I also, think there is much truth in this "tombstone," but, I am curious, if you made it up or others (whom) have set it up and you 'found' it.
     
  10. Eagle

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    Very true Salty, but I hope, for the sake of God's truth and the unity of His people, and more importantly - for the sake of His one true message - that the ineffective, man-made jumble called Fundamentalism, is in fact, on it's deathbed.
     
  11. TCassidy

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    I disagree. Fundamentalism is not a movement. It is a position a person takes on the fundamentals of the faith.
    Even the above paragraph shows that you believe fundamentalism is not a movement but a position. You question whether or not recent TTU graduates would call themselves fundamentalists. That is a position, not a movement. :)
    Well, SOTL may, at one time, have been one voice of fundamentalists, but there were many, many others. SOTL probably most likely represented the Moderate position while the Militant position was represented by BJUs "Faith For the Family" and "Frontline" published by the Fundamental Baptist Fellowship." There were also many excellent more regional publications such as "The Blueprint" and "The Northstar Baptist."
     
  12. TCassidy

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    There is, and never was, a "Fundamentalist Movement." There were only fundamentalists, of every conceivable stripe, color, denomination, and practice. :)
     
  13. TCassidy

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    So you look forward to the death of fundamentalism?

    Which of the fundamentals do you most abhor and want to be the first to die?

    1. The Deity of Christ.
    2. The Virgin Birth.
    3. The Blood Atonement.
    4. The Inerrancy of Scripture.
    5. The Bodily Resurrection.

    And why do you wish them to die?
     
  14. Salty

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    # 6 is my choice - LEGALISM
     
  15. Rippon

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    Now that's sarcasm. Conservative Evangelicals would agree with all six.

    Fundamentalim goes beyond those six propositions. So your premise is flawed.
     
  16. jaigner

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    These are fundamentalist in a very specific sense. The term "fundamentalist" generally is used as a pejorative to denote the legalistic, moralistic, behavior-oriented, anti-academic facet of evangelicalism.
     
  17. jaigner

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    Cha-ching.
     
  18. TCassidy

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    One of the greatest theological errors of the 20th century was neo-orthodoxy. Neo-orthodoxy redefined terms to suit their own bias. They believed like Modernists but redefined theological terms so they could use the same words Evangelicals used to make them sound orthodox.

    It seems neo-orthodoxy is alive and well right here. Take a good word with historic meaning and redefine it to suit your biases.

    Fundamentalism is exactly what it always was, a belief in the fundamentals of the faith. To try to redefine the term to suit your biases is not only unethical but theologically neo-orthodox. :(
     
  19. TCassidy

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    Then you are using the term incorrectly. :)
     
  20. go2church

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    The obit might read "Fundamentalism, died today, completely distracted by the unimportant"
     
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