Pakistan Wants To Make A deal With Osama Bin Laden

Discussion in '2006 Archive' started by Petra-O IX, Sep 5, 2006.

  1. Petra-O IX

    Petra-O IX
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    Now this is sad but it does not suprise me, I have never considered Pakistan as a good ally.

    http://blogs.abcnews.com/theblotter/2006/09/bin_laden_gets_.html
    Osama bin Laden, America's most wanted man, will not face capture in Pakistan if he agrees to lead a "peaceful life," Pakistani officials tell ABC News.

    The surprising announcement comes as Pakistani army officials announced they were pulling their troops out of the North Waziristan region as part of a "peace deal" with the Taliban.

    If he is in Pakistan, bin Laden "would not be taken into custody," Major General Shaukat Sultan Khan told ABC News in a telephone interview, "as long as one is being like a peaceful citizen."

    Bin Laden is believed to be hiding somewhere in the tribal areas of Pakistan, near the Afghanistan border, but U.S. officials say his precise location is unknown.

    In addition to the pullout of Pakistani troops, the "peace agreement" between Pakistan and the Taliban also provides for the Pakistani army to return captured Taliban weapons and prisoners.

    "What this means is that the Taliban and al Qaeda leadership have effectively carved out a sanctuary inside Pakistan," said ABC News consultant Richard Clarke, the former White House counter-terrorism director.

    The agreement was signed on the same day President Bush said the United States was working with its allies "to deny terrorists the enclaves they seek to establish in ungoverned areas across the world."

    The Pakistani Army had gone into Waziristan, under heavy pressure from the United States, but faced a series of humiliating defeats at the hands of the Taliban and al Qaeda fighters.

    "They're throwing the towel," said Alexis Debat, who is a Senior Fellow at the Nixon Center and an ABC News consultant. "They're giving al Qaeda and the Taliban a blank check and saying essentially make yourselves at home in the tribal areas," Debat said.

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    Osama Bin Laden must be captured despite Pakistans beliefs that Osama could lead a peaceful life. Pakistan is stabbing us in the Back.
     
  2. StefanM

    StefanM
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    I never trusted Pakistan.
     
  3. LeBuick

    LeBuick
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    So do we start a war with them now?
     
  4. StefanM

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    Oh I hope not. It would be absolute foolishness to fight Pakistan. They DO have nukes NOW.
     
  5. KenH

    KenH
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    I can't say that I blame Pakistan. We had a great opportunity to capture or kill bin Laden in Afghanistan before he escaped into Pakistan and absolutely blew it. Why should we expect them to risk their necks to make up for our failure?

    "The CIA ran the U.S. government’s extraordinarily successful Afghan covert action program from 1979 until late in 1992. I was fortunate to work on it from late 1985 until February 1992. All told, according to Steve Coll in his book Ghost Wars (2004), that program spent billions of dollars in U.S. and Saudi funds to support the Afghan jihad, and on no important occasion can I recall the Afghan insurgents ever doing anything we—the CIA or the U.S. government—asked them to do. The Afghans often would agree to do something we wanted done, take the proffered funding and arms, and then do exactly as they pleased. Indeed, if an Afghan commander had planned to do something that turned out to be what we wanted done, he was likely to abandon the plan so we did not think he was doing America’s bidding. And Masood, the brilliant Tajik insurgent commander whose legend—built by the French journalists and scholars he deceived—portrays him as a saintly, pro-Western, almost flower-power mujahid, was by far the worst offender in this regard.

    There is, of course, no such thing as altruistic covert action, but the Agency’s Afghan program was a close approximation. At the end of the day, our major contribution to defeating the Soviets was to ensure that Russians could be killed with AK-47s rather than 19th-century Lee-Enfield rifles. This is the lesson that Tenet and his colleagues ignored. As a result, the U.S. military subcontracted the job of capturing bin Laden at Tora Bora to Afghan commanders who had fought the Red Army with bin Laden. Needless to say, the Afghans took our money, and then made sure to arrive a day late. Thus, bin Laden bedevils us to this day."

    - Michael Scheuer, "Clueless Into Kabul", The American Interest(September/October 2006), p. 114.
     
    #5 KenH, Sep 5, 2006
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2006
  6. pinoybaptist

    pinoybaptist
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    Ever heard of tactics ? They do have to draw out that murderer and his murdering cohorts, and they can't because those germs are swimming in the dungpile of supporters.

    so, hol' ya hosses, boys.
     

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