Pinched Nerve

Discussion in 'Health and Wellness' started by SaggyWoman, Mar 31, 2013.

  1. SaggyWoman

    SaggyWoman
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    Have you ever had a pinched nerve in your back? What did you do about it?
     
  2. Scarlett O.

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    I had a pinched nerve in my hip/upper thigh once and it put me on the floor in the living room for two days. I had to crawl to the bathroom. I was like my whole left leg was on literal fire and in a vice.

    [A couple of teacher friends and I wanted to switch classrooms and I got the bright idea that I could do it all by myself, so I went to school one Saturday, couldn't find the dolly, and I switched three rooms of furniture by pushing everything with my hip.]

    Well, eventually on the third morning of agony, I went to the doctor and got muscle relaxers.

     
  3. Revmitchell

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    I blew my back out in 99. Two herniated disks. I have had plenty of pinched nerves. Been laid up in bed more than a handful of times. Rest and stretching helps a bunch. If you have some muscle relaxers that can be of assistance. If you don't over the counter sleeping pills can be a good alternative. (not quite the same) But in the end the best thing is rest and stretching.
     
  4. Earth Wind and Fire

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    How about a hot bath?
     
  5. Salty

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    I "accquired" my pinched nerve when I was in Alaska.

    The doctor preformed a "Wallyectomony" - ie he told me not to wear my wallet in my back pockets anymore!

    Hurts a little every now and them, but I just take the pills the VA gave me and then usually, I am just fine.
     
  6. Melanie

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    Yep....you sure KNOW about it, heat, muscular relaxants and analgesia are good in the short term, getting a good therapy programme for stretching and gentle mobilisation is the way to go.

    One thing I have found, you damage something and it is NEVER quite as good as before injury. I do certain activities for shorter duration as I find the reptitiveness of activities such as ironing, gardening and cleaning inflame my cervical and lumbar areas in interesting and excruciatng ways.
     
  7. Benjamin

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    For myself, I’d focus on the muscular imbalances which are causing the problem and the improper positioning that lead to the injury while being careful to maintain spinal neutral position.

    For others, if you really want to know, :) I often begin with those in the acute phase by placing them in supine on a plinth with feet elevated and supported while I apply heat to decrease pain and to increase vasodilation and soft issue mobilization. Then I help them get into spinal neutral position and teach them to begin learning to use their postural control muscles properly by doing some “simple” exercises. Then, I usually finish the intervention with soft tissue manipulation/therapeutic massage maybe accompanied with some spinal joint mobes and/or placing them into traction.

    After the acute stage, I remind them to stay in spinal neutral position while I begin having them work on their muscular imbalances and postural stability along with stretching and closely followed by training in bio-mechanical movements and utilizing proper kinetic chains involving the base of support.

    My suspicion would be on the Piriformis putting pressure on the sciatic nerve (which runs down the lower extremities) from being inflamed and tightened due to poor mechanics. I try to avoid muscle relaxers because of the side effects that they do not differentiate on which muscles are relaxed; they relax all muscles in your body so basically nothing is working correctly.

    Idda probably had you feeling much better in 30-40 minutes after applying some heat, doing some stretching and therapeutic massage to loosen and relax the tension causing the pressure on the nerve. The only side effect you might have from that is a red face :eek: from the manual muscle stimulation you just received.

    :laugh:
     
  8. annsni

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    I go to see my PT friend who seems to be able to help whatever ails me in one or two visits!!

    This last time I went to her, my back was in such pain that I was taking Vicodin to be able to sleep - and I didn't even take Vicodin after my c-section!! I saw Lisa at 3 pm and by 4 was walking out of there literally skipping! It seems I did something to my pelvis on my left side and it was locked, from what she said. She had me slowly bend forward and she said the left side of my pelvis went straight away with my spine whereas the right stayed until I actually moved down to that level. So after some tricky manipulation with her thumb in my butt cheek and my knee in my chest, I was suddenly free! It was incredible!! From a pain level of 9 to 0 in a matter of an hour. WONDERFUL!!

    I wish everyone had someone like her around. :)
     
  9. Benjamin

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    Aren’t PTs great!? :smilewinkgrin: No really, I kid that I feel like a charismatic miracle healer at times. It’s like I get my hands on them and poof they’re like “It’s a miracle, I’m healed!”. Although, I soon as I hear it I try not to let anyone get away without some instruction about cause and prevention and it disappoints me when these people neglect follow up visits when it is very apparent, especially with back injuries, concerning the issues which caused the problem in the first place that they still need some intervention and these things should be dealt with for a better quality of life for them.

    When I see patients leaving and being reluctant to make another appointment after I explained the need for them to do so, I’m like, “Okay, I’ll see you later!” :wavey: – I actually mean that literally and figure most likely it will not be under favorite circumstances. While after “healing them” I feel like choking some sense into them! :(

    A PT's job really isn't focused on the instant gratification as much as keeping them moving pain free and living a quality lifestyle as long as possible and I can't do that for them, I can only instruct them in what needs to be done, it is really up to them.
     
  10. Scarlett O.

    Scarlett O.
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    The excruciating pain that I was in for those 2-3 days - well, I wouldn't have cared what color my face turned! :laugh:
     
  11. annsni

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    Fortunately, Lisa knows all her patients and she knows where they live! LOL But she definitely sends us home with homework and if we need to see her again, trust me - we will. :)
     
  12. Benjamin

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    I'll have to remember that threat...I have their addresses right there in my records.
     
    #12 Benjamin, Apr 4, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 4, 2013
  13. Benjamin

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    Ha, funny because I'm finding it to be more than true than not for people in pain that no sooner that I explain the prodedure and ask permission to go there the patients are like - Yes! Do it! Here! - and I'm like - WHOA!! Cover eyes, cross-sign!! Hey, let me take this towel and help you with that. :laugh:

    In truth, as a new grad its me that seems to be getting a bit embarrassed and shaky at times. Just landed a dream job and begin a one year internship with the president of an orthopedic board in a beautiful 10,000sf health gym with PT so I guess I'll get used to it. Start in about 2 weeks and plan to devote all my time into improving my knowledge skills so probably won't be around here much.
     

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