Psalms

Discussion in 'Music Ministry' started by Nonsequitur, Dec 4, 2007.

  1. Nonsequitur

    Nonsequitur
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    The thread on "Should some beats be avoided?" got me to thinking. (I know, don't hurt myself now.) According to the notes in my study Bible, Psalms is also known as the Book of Psalms, from a Greek word indicating songs sung to the accompaniment of stringed instruments. (Also laments and praises.) Authorship has been given to David, Solomon, sons of Korah, Asapth, Heman, Ethan and Moses.
    The words of course are here in the Bible.

    What happened to the music?

    Honest question. Sorry for not replying back to any responses today, but the only computer I have access to is at work, it's past quitting time, and I need to go to the store before Bible class. See ya'll in the morning.:wavey:
     
  2. Aaron

    Aaron
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    The music was lost long ago, but all small group of people believe the original melodies were preserved in the teamim (the accent marks) in a certain subgroup of the Masoretic texts. They believe the melodies are original because rabbinical tradition states that particular subset preserves the "true tradition."

    Suzanne Haik Vantoura, a French musicologist par excellence, worked with the signs understanding them to be musical notation and developed a key to decipher them. She gave a detailed description of her work in her book The Music of the Bible Revealed: The Deciphering of a Millenary Notation, (Bibal Press).

    This was discussed some time in the past, and I revisited the discussion just recently here:

    http://www.baptistboard.com/showthread.php?t=44816
     
  3. Nonsequitur

    Nonsequitur
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    Thanks Aaron. I have asked this question a few times in my life, (the other thread reminded me of it) and never got a decent answer. I will try to find her book. The second link would not come up as my company has it blocked as offensive. Go figure.
     
  4. Aaron

    Aaron
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    Try this link: http://www.cgmusic.com/library/musicofthebible.htm

    Another musicologist Abraham Idelsohn, (1882-1938) assumed that certain musical phrases which were found in Jewish folk music from every corner of the globe (despite the prevailing cultures) were remnants of 1st - century Temple tunes.

    A group called The San Antonio Vocal Arts Ensemble put the phrases Idelsohn indentified into original works in Middle Eastern styles on a CD called, appropriately enough, Ancient Echoes, and accompanied themselves on replicas of ancient instruments. (Note: Though their publicist billed the recording as "Music from the time of Jesus," the ensemble itself is making no such claims.

    They used Haik-Vanoura's work on tracks 8 and 15 of their CD.
     
  5. Aaron

    Aaron
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    In the above link, Psalms 122 and 150 are the most impressive. Keep in mind only the melodies are contained in the texts. The harmonies inferred and the instrumental accompaniament added is mere artistic license.
     
    #5 Aaron, Dec 5, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 5, 2007
  6. Rubato 1

    Rubato 1
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    I think you'd be suprised how many Bible verses can be sung to the melody of the Flintstones' theme. :laugh:


    I think there might be a seed of truth in the idea that this melody has been around for millenia, and has supernaturally been preserved in its original form by the Flintstones' translators.
     

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