question for the scholars out there

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by Mike McK, Jul 20, 2007.

  1. Mike McK

    Mike McK
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2001
    Messages:
    6,630
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know just about enough Greek to be dangerous, but not enough to know what I'm talking about. Can somebody please tell me how to spell audioperon? I was listening to Todd Friel talk about it and would like to study it out for myself, but can't figure out how to spell it.
     
  2. John of Japan

    John of Japan
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2005
    Messages:
    12,208
    Likes Received:
    192
    I'd be happy to help, but I don't know any similar Greek word. Can you give us more information? What is it supposed to mean? Where is it used in the NT? :type:
     
  3. Mike McK

    Mike McK
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2001
    Messages:
    6,630
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't know where it's found. I can't look it up because I can't spell it.

    As I understand what Todd Friel was saying about it, it refers to those doctrines that are not clearly spelled out in scripture, the ones that we're to give each other the liberty to disagree on.

    I spelled it as closely to the way he pronouced it as I can.

    Au-di-'op-er-on.

    That's as close to any sort of a phonetic spelling as I can get.

    If you can figure it out or if somebody else knows, I'd sure appreciate it. This is driving me crazy.
     
  4. EdSutton

    EdSutton
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    8,755
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can't help much, for I ain't no scholar! And I don't know the context, exactly, but would say this (and have a much easier word for you, as well) in answer.

    A 'doctrine,' that is not clearly spelled out in Scripture, is merely an "opinion." :)

    I'd guess you will not need "phonetic spelling" to understand this word. :D

    Ed
     
    #4 EdSutton, Jul 20, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 20, 2007
  5. John of Japan

    John of Japan
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2005
    Messages:
    12,208
    Likes Received:
    192
    The closest I can come for you with this information is hodoiporeo, which means "to travel, journey" (Thayer's lexicon). It is only used in Acts 10:9, where Peter went up on the rooftop to pray as Cornelius "journeyed" towards him. Does that ring a bell?
     
  6. Mike McK

    Mike McK
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2001
    Messages:
    6,630
    Likes Received:
    0
    No, but thanks for trying.
     
  7. Hope of Glory

    Hope of Glory
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Messages:
    4,807
    Likes Received:
    0
    Maybe something from the root "oida", which is "to have information about" or "know".

    JoJ mentioned another good possibility for what you're talking about.

    Maybe something with the root "ode", which is a reference to an entity viewed as present or near in terms of the narrative context.
     
  8. J. Jump

    J. Jump
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Messages:
    4,108
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ed you are one funny character. I love reading your posts. :thumbs:
     
  9. EdSutton

    EdSutton
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    8,755
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks, but this one was not meant to be especially humorous, for "unspelled out doctrine" is, in fact, and at best, nothing more than bias, opinion or preference, I would say.

    Ed
     
  10. J. Jump

    J. Jump
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Messages:
    4,108
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would agree, but it was still funny :). :applause:
     
  11. Jerome

    Jerome
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2006
    Messages:
    5,609
    Likes Received:
    44
    adiaphoron
     
  12. TCGreek

    TCGreek
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2006
    Messages:
    7,373
    Likes Received:
    0
    1. Now this is the only passage that I know fit what you described:τον δε ασθενουντα τη πιστει προσλαμβανεσθε μη εις διακρισεις διαλογισμων
    (Romans 14:1).

    2. "Now accept the one who is weak in the faith, and do no quarrel over disputation matters" (Rom 14:1, TCG).

    3. μη εις διακρισεις διαλογισμων : Do not argue over opinions/disputable matters.
     
  13. Pipedude

    Pipedude
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2005
    Messages:
    1,070
    Likes Received:
    0
    Jerome got it. But EdSutton was almost as close.
     
  14. John of Japan

    John of Japan
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2005
    Messages:
    12,208
    Likes Received:
    192
    Nope. Can't find this in any Greek lexicon, classical or koine. [​IMG]
     
  15. Pipedude

    Pipedude
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2005
    Messages:
    1,070
    Likes Received:
    0
    It's a Lutheran thang.
     
  16. John of Japan

    John of Japan
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2005
    Messages:
    12,208
    Likes Received:
    192
    :laugh:
    And here I don't speak Lutheran! Shucks. [​IMG]
     
  17. Pipedude

    Pipedude
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2005
    Messages:
    1,070
    Likes Received:
    0
    The Lutherans had a fuss back in Melancthon's day over how much Catholicism had to be abandoned and how much could be retained. Those things which were deemed indifferent (such as, we might say, singing the Gloria Patri) were called adiaphora. Why they chose a Greek word instead of a Latin one is beyond me, but the Lutherans have kept the word until this day and use it whenever somebody wants to start doing something that they formerly couldn't.

    It always helps if you can state your position in Greek or Latin. The aura of authority glows like a sunrise and detractors are left speechless. If they admit that they don't understand the word, it makes you look smarter than they. If they try to bluff, they'll wind up mispronouncing it. :thumbs:
     
  18. John of Japan

    John of Japan
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2005
    Messages:
    12,208
    Likes Received:
    192
    Shazzam! You 'da man, Pipedude. I hereby appoint you the BB resident scholar on Catholic/Lutheran Greek words! [​IMG]
     
  19. Pipedude

    Pipedude
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2005
    Messages:
    1,070
    Likes Received:
    0
    Talk about being a big fish in a small pond . . . This is even less prestigious than when I was the New Leader of Fundamentalism.

    I need a non-English name for this position to add that aura of authority I mentioned. Somethig like schola residenta de verborum grecorum catholicorum luteranorum, or some Greeky equivalent. But since my new field is now historical dogmatics, I hearby delegate today's wordsmithing to any volunteers who want to take a stab at it.

    Absum!
     
  20. John of Japan

    John of Japan
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2005
    Messages:
    12,208
    Likes Received:
    192
    Naw, let's not be pretentious. Let's just go with an acronym, one that even upgrades you a little bit from just Latin and Greek words: the gracious and honorable Pipedude, "Resident Scholar of Lutheranism and Catholicism"-- RESLUCP (pro. "re-slop"). :type: :applause: :applause: :applause:
     

Share This Page

Loading...