Quick Chili Sauce

Discussion in 'Hobby/Travel Forum' started by Bro. Curtis, Feb 25, 2015.

  1. Bro. Curtis

    Bro. Curtis
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    1/2 cup each of water, rice wine vinegar, and honey or brown sugar.

    Bring to a boil. Add 1 tablespoon each of ground ginger root, crushed red pepper, and a heaping teaspoon of crushed garlic. Add a teaspoon of ketchup, or bbq sauce of your choice.

    Simmer and stir for five minutes, stir in a heaping teaspoon of corn starch, and remove from heat.

    Great with shrimp, scallops, chicken, porkā€¦.
     
  2. kyredneck

    kyredneck
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    Is this lo carb lo cal? :laugh:
     
  3. Bro. Curtis

    Bro. Curtis
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    Strictly high test. I cook for taste. Anyway, you're supposed to dip in it, not eat it like it was soup. There's enough for 6 people in this.
     
    #3 Bro. Curtis, Feb 25, 2015
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  4. kyredneck

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    OK, gotcha. No doubt the ingredients would give an intense flavor, which would make a good dip.

    I've made a lot of moles from dried chiles, but they're definitely not quick.
     
  5. Bro. Curtis

    Bro. Curtis
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    My neighbor grows peppers, and he usually gives me a basketful, every summer. They dry quite nicely all by themselves on a sunny shelf with this 12% humidity. I can never even use them all, he gives us so many of them. So I cook a lot and invite them over. He told me I should be bragging about this dip. so here I am !!!
     
  6. Bro. Curtis

    Bro. Curtis
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    But yeah, you won't find any of my dishes in the Health and Wellness forum.
     
  7. kyredneck

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    Sugar is an ingredient that I rarely use, actually nowadays I never use it. I'm slowly learning to use stevia, a 100% natural sweetener, over sucrose. I'm not diabetic but it runs in my family so I try to keep glycemic response to a minimum with most of my cooking.

    One ingredient I use a lot is my own rendered 'artisanal lard'. Lard got a bad rap for decades, it pans out many of the vegetable oils, particularly hydrogenated ones, are the real culprits in coronary disease, along with sugar also.
     
  8. Bro. Curtis

    Bro. Curtis
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    I use lard all the time for cooking. My own, usually.

    Processed sugar is awful, as are the vegetable syrups, I never use them. I never use vegetable oil, except Olive oil for cooking in a pan.

    Butter can be a good substitute for lard, sometimes. I use butter for my breakfast biscuits, sometimes, but that can get expensive.
     
  9. kyredneck

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    Oh, I use olive oil and butter, a lot. We keep a butter dish on the table.

    There's a grocery chain in these parts called Sav-A-Lot and their butchers provide pork suet @ .39 a lb. and they also sell 2 lb packages of country ham scraps, and WalMart sells 3 lb. packages of bacon scraps, and I render a combo of the three together, and can it, the lard and the cracklings both are outstanding seasoning. I actually have quite a stockpile of it already, but we use it, and it frees freezer space for other things. Dad and two youngest daughters love it and I trade it for country eggs also.
     
    #9 kyredneck, Feb 26, 2015
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  10. kyredneck

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    There's also an Amish slaughterhouse a couple counties over that sells 35-50# lots of pure leaf suet for $5.00 which I use to render pure' 'neutral flavor' lard. But I'm really backed up on that now because everybody seems to prefer the flavored lard.

    Sorry. I've derailed your thread from sweet & spicy to fat. :)
     
    #10 kyredneck, Feb 26, 2015
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  11. Bro. Curtis

    Bro. Curtis
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    We keep hens for eggs. Lost two when winter hit. We are down to our Rhode Island Reds, and let me tell ya, they seem indestructible. Egg laying machines, those Reds. They also eat their weight in bugs in the summer, and they patrol the squirrels who try to raid the bird feeders. The fertilizer works good on the wife's flower garden, but we have to seriously dilute it. And if you ever want to be seriously entertained, watch the hens fight over a piece of bacon. In my youth I would saunter down to the local bar for my thrill seeking, but nowadays, I grab a beer and just go watch the chickens. Funny animals.
     
    #11 Bro. Curtis, Feb 26, 2015
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  12. kyredneck

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    You getting any eggs from those RIRs this winter?

    We kept chickens for years, it's odd I don't recall having any RIRs. Buff Orpingtons became our favorite; docile, white skinned, good combo meat & egg bird, fair winter layers, good mothers, too good actually, that's the only complaint with the breed, they're prone to go broody, one hen goes to sit and several others follow suit.

    My middle daughter has free range geese, ducks, guineas, chickens (she's settled on yellow buffs also), but she has to keep them confined while this snow is on the ground.

    I love those duck eggs.
     
    #12 kyredneck, Feb 27, 2015
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