Race and Christianity....

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by Username, Aug 9, 2010.

  1. Username

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    This weekend, I was reading "I May Not Get There with You: The True Martin Luther King, Jr" by Michael Eric Dyson.

    There are several references made to "black Christianity".
    I've always considered Christianity to be a common ground for all races. Can anyone elaborate on the differences in "white Christianity" and "black Christianity"?

    I've been to black and white churches throughout the south and in Chicago (one of the more racially charged cities in the world). I've never noticed anything that would cause me to segregate Christianity.

    It seems like an absurd, second-hand notion....but the author is an ordained Baptist minister.
     
  2. freeatlast

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    It's true that there is but one Christianity, And that there should not be any kind of segregate Christianity. However there is a distinct difference in the manner in which different ethnic groups hold their services. I too have been to many differently led services and I do have my preference. Is it because I am of a specific ethnic group. Perhaps I am not sure. However I am positive that I desire clear bible teaching and church obedience, but I don't find it as a rule in any ethnic group.
    So while Christianity is common ground for all, not all have common ground to Christianity. :thumbs:
     
  3. preachinjesus

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    Interesting read, what are your thoughts about it?

    The author isn't being racist or trying to segregate the church (not that 11 am on Sundays isn't already deeply segregated in America) rather he is acknowledging there is a unique theological vantage point in how African-American Christianity approaches some issues.

    For instance in predominately African-American church vs. others there is more of an emphasis in liberation theology, prosperity teaching, race relations, economic tensions, and other related issues. The difference isn't immediately noticeable but it is there. Over the past several years there has been a lot written academically about these differences.

    It really isn't a second-hand notion, it is a theological categorization that recognizes inherent differences.
     
  4. Username

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    -I think that it is a rather challenging read. Challenging in a good way. It helps to combat a real social amnesia. I was born in the first 1/2 of the 80's, so it is necessary (for me) to look back on the 'civil rights era' and see how far we've come and how far we need to go.

    The author goes too far in trying to politicize social issues. He makes valid points, but he stretches it to the extreme. He does point the finger at both sides of the aisle, though. To me, the issues that he is addressing should transcend liberalism, conservatism and progressivism. This may be because I'm burned out on the political machine, that fails at producing much significant change or positive social reform.

    Who Martin Luther King, Jr. was has definitely been distorted. His 'career' should be viewed in it's entirety. It's an injustice to define him by reading/hearing excerpts of his essays/sermons/speeches.

    King's view on race relations in the south were extraordinarily accurate. It was interesting to read how his views changed after a summer above the M-D line. The dichotomy of Malcolm X and MLK,J's relationship is fairly captivating. I'd like to read more about it's nuances.

    -I agree that Dyson is not being racist and I recognize the segregation of Sunday services.
    I was just wondering if someone could expound on the theology of "black Christianity". As you said, "it is a theological categorization that recognizes inherent differences." Assuming that may be the case, I was just hoping that someone could expound on the differences. Could you point me in the direction of some of the academic writings re: black Christianity?
     
  5. Dale-c

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    The fact is that there is too much segregation in the church.
    YOu are right though that there is only one christianity and only one gospel.

    When blacks and whites can't worship together it is a sign of poor theology on the part of one or both.
    I have however worshiped with a predominately black church before and I also listen to a podcast weekly that features a black pastor.

    Christ's kingdom contains people of all races, from all countries.
    It is sad that we put our earthly kingdoms first, but we often do.
     
  6. Jon-Marc

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    When I moved to Florida and was looking for a church, I visited one church and found I was the only white person there. I've been in churches with different nationalities and skin colors, and that's no problem for me. However, being the only person of light skin, I felt out of place.

    What I didn't like was the "black gospel" style of music. It is too repetitious for me. They get stuck on a phrase and keep repeating it for several minutes. I find that very irritating.
     
  7. Earth Wind and Fire

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    Gotta laugh Jon..... I went to a reformed church for over 20 years & when I started to go to a Baptist Church I felt outa place because they didnt sing the songs I was used to....He finally had us sing "Guide me oh thou great Jehovah & "Amazing Grace" & I felt so much better.
     
  8. Salty

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    I disagree -

    I have attended and been members of both black and white churches. Overall, black churches tend to be more of a "swing-gospel"* then I care for. Now, that does not mean I am right and they are wrong - it is simply a matter of preference. It has nothing to do with theology!
    In addition, a number of black preachers "talk black"* and with my hearing problem it is often hard for me to understand. - and its not just my black preacher friends - I have a good friend from India - same thing - with his accent, I had a hard time comprehending his preaching service.

    * if anybody can come up, with a better term - I' game!
     

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