Radically Different Meanings

Discussion in '2005 Archive' started by Dr. Bob, May 5, 2005.

  1. Dr. Bob

    Dr. Bob
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    Not just looking at the Bible, but at the English language in its evolution {can I say that word? [​IMG] ] from 1600 to 2000, we see a number of words that the common everyday useage and understanding by the man on the street has CHANGED RADICALLY.

    Try to list just one and give all a chance to participate?

    LET - in 1600 it meant to allow OR to hinder, put down. Almost all uses of "let" are NOT direct translations of a Greek word, but in English phrasing of a verb form.

    LET - in 2000 (unless one is playing tennis and has a "let" serve, hindered by the net) the average Joe would say it means to allow.

    So in looking at II Thes and "he who lets will let", the average person today would take this to mean radically opposite of what is truly meant.
     
  2. TCassidy

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    Why do you assume you know the meaning of "let" but the "average person" doesn't? Are you suggesting that you are "above average" and most everyone else is beneath you in intelligence and understanding? [​IMG]
     
  3. robycop3

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    SUFFER...Now means to endure pain or distress,(I am suffering from the flu) or to sustain loss or damage(I suffered a $2K loss in the stock market)

    Another meaning...to allow...is little-used outside voting rights being called suffrage.
     
  4. Ed Edwards

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    Why do you want to let Dr. Bob?
    He really didn't say HE was better than
    anybody else, only that some people understand
    1611 English but more NOW DAYS understand
    21st Century (2001-2100) English. What he
    said would include you, if you had something
    better to do than to go around letting
    harried Admins. [​IMG]
     
  5. TCassidy

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    I will always expose such arrogance, especially when it is designed to cause division and strife among Christians.

    It is one thing to oppose the error of KJVOism but it is another thing to deliberately go about stirring up strife among the brethren.
     
  6. StefanM

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    Dr. Bob wasn't trying to be arrogant.
     
  7. Ed Edwards

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    Amen, Brother StefanM -- Preach it! [​IMG]
     
  8. natters

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    We had a thread on this a few months ago. I found my old post:

    - bosses = Bump-like shapes on a shield (Job 15:26)
    - bowels = affections (Philemon 1:7)
    - carriage = baggage, luggage (Acts 21:15)
    - dam = mother (Exo 22:30)
    - fats = vats (Joel 2:24)
    - flowers = menstrual flow (Lev 15:24)
    - haunt = one's place where they usually can be found (1 Sam 23:22)
    - leasing = deceit (Psa 4:2)
    - let = prevented (Rom 1:13)
    - lusty = healthy and strong (Judges 3:29)
    - matrix = womb (Exo 13:12)
    - mean = common (Prov 22:29)
    - mess = portion of food, a meal (Gen 43:34)
    - muffler = veil to cover the face (Isa 3:19)
    - ouches = sockets for jewels (Exo 28:11)
    - overcharged = weighed down (Luke 21:34)
    - peeled = smooth, bald (Isa 18:2)
    - prevent = go before (1 Thess 4:15)
    - pulse = Peas, beans (2 Sam 17:28)
    - quit = found not guilty (Exo 21:19), behave (1 Sam 4:9)
    - rank = full-grown (Gen 41:5)
    - reins = kidneys (Job 16:13)
    - road = raid (1 Sam 27:10)
    - single = clear, pure, healthy (Matt 6:22)
    - strait = close together (Matt 7:13), be in distress (Luke 12:50)
    - suffer = allow (Exo 22:18)
    - talent = weight of money (Matt 25:24)
    - target = small shield (1 Sam 17:6)
    - tired = put something around the head, turban (2 Kings 9:30)
    - translate = remove to another place (2 Sam 3:10)
    - want = lack (Psa 23:1)
     
  9. TCassidy

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    Whether he was trying or not he certainly succeeded.
     
  10. TCassidy

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    You left out neesings. :D
     
  11. natters

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    I only included words that have a changed meaning today. Neesings doesn't have a new meaning today, it just dropped out of use altogether.
     
  12. Michael52

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    Whether he was trying or not he certainly succeeded. </font>[/QUOTE]I figure I'm a nearly average type. I do not know what it means (without looking in an MV). So, I don't think Dr. Bob is arrogant. I think he's right!

    TCassidy, maybe your just well above average! [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  13. gb93433

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    The meaning of the word conversation has change a lot since the initial printing of the KJV.
     
  14. mioque

    mioque
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    I'm such a lusty lass... ;)
     
  15. Ed Edwards

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    Psalms 42:1 (KJV1611):
    As the Hart panteth after the water brookes,
    so panteth my soule after thee
    , O God.


    Psalms 42:1 (KJV1769):
    As the hart panteth after the water brooks,
    so panteth my soul after thee
    , O God.

    What is a 'Hart' (or 'hart') and what is a 'panteth'?
     
  16. HankD

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    Mark 1:30
    But Simon's wife's mother lay sick of a fever, and anon they tell him of her.

    HankD
     
  17. av1611jim

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    Any fool knows a hart is a member of the deer family.
    And you also should know what "panteth" are.
    Today we call 'em blue jeans! [​IMG] :rolleyes:

    In HIS service;
    Jim
     
  18. av1611jim

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    The KJV is a good and proper English translation.
    It appears to me what many folks are calling for is an American translation.
    I honestly do not think our common language has changed as much as some here would like to think.

    I have posted here before the often confusing words the NIV has included to replace the perfectly understandable words of the KJV, but to no avail.
    For example abasement for heaviness @ Ezra 9:5. And breakers for waves @ Ps 93:4. There are dozens of these.

    This is another dead horse. Who has the "dead horse" smiley? ;)

    In HIS service;
    Jim
     
  19. FrankBetz

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    Uh, "Let it not be so!" means to hinder something from not being so. The "point" is therefore moot.

    Also "Let It BE" (of Beatles fame) means to leave it alone, meaning to prevent "it" from never being the same. Thus preventative the word "let" remains.
     
  20. FrankBetz

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    To let something happen, means to prevent interference of the things which would PREVENT the happening.

    Such shallowness! Ant "these" promote themselves in the lingual arts!! [​IMG]
     

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