Reformed Baptist Seminary

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by nunatak, Apr 13, 2008.

  1. nunatak

    nunatak
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  2. Broadus

    Broadus
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    For preparation in ministry, it looks very solid, indeed. Nothing of the ostentatious degrees such as offered by the less-than-credible institutions or held by their faculties. If you were planning an academic career, however, you could run into entrance problems.

    Having said that, I think their requirements and faculty are very good.

    Bill
     
  3. nunatak

    nunatak
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    I appreciate the comment. I just want to preach the gospel.
     
  4. Rhetorician

    Rhetorician
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    Nunatek Response

    Hello Dear Brother,

    Added edit!

    Nunatak, let me first say that just wanting "to preach the gospel" may not just be as simple as one thinks. The "call to preach" is a call to prepare is it not. And I know that you know this or else you would not be asking such pointed questions.

    One also has to deal with evangelism and world missions. What is my part in the larger enterprise to which I have been called. Many is the time when young ministers have a too provincial understanding of what the Lord has done, is doing, and wants to do. So, it seems to me in my old age and hindsight, that you are not only preparing for what you may be doing in the next ten years. But you may be preparing for greater works even 50 years from now, if the Lord tarries still?! When one considers the long term, we want to have the best so we can be the best for the Master's will and glory, do we not?

    Back to original post:

    I will "second that emotion" of my dear friend and colleague. Listen to him, he is sharp and "knows from whence he speaks."

    I have seen their web page before. It seems to me that you will get a good and rigorous education there. I do, however, know something about:

    "Sam Waldron began serving as a pastor in 1977 and is currently a pastor of Heritage Baptist Church, Owensboro, Kentucky. He is a graduate and former professor of Trinity Ministerial Academy. He holds a Master of Theology degree (Th.M.) from Grand Rapids Baptist Seminary and a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Systematic Theology at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He has authored such books as A Modern Exposition of the 1689 Confession of Faith (Evangelical Press), Baptist Roots in America (Simpson Publishing), The End Times Made Simple (Calvary Press), and A Reformed Baptist Manifesto (Reformed Baptist Academic Press). He is currently Professor of Systematic Theology at Midwest Center for Theological Studies and an Associate Editor of the Reformed Baptist Theological Review. Sam and his wife, Charlene, have five children."

    He is one of their adjunct faculty. Dr. Waldron is the real deal.

    He spoke at the "Building Bridges Conference" at the Lifeway (SBC) Center at Ridgeway, NC this past November. His church maintains what seems to be a "sister academy" "in house" "church school" similar to the one that you are investigating. I was even introduced to him by a mutual friend and we talked about some mutual interests we have.

    Anyway, if you want credentials for preaching, teaching, counseling, discipling, et al ministries in the local church; then this seems to be a good and viable alternative.

    I must slip a word in here as polemic or apologetic. A polemic for this particular program and an apologetic against other "church schools" that I have railed against in the past.

    This is not a "diploma mill." They just don't hand out degrees when you pay your "really big bucks." Make sure you "gird up the loins of your mind," b/c you will have to work when you get there. My educated or scholarly guess is that the work done there will equal some seminaries that I have seen and know about. It may even surpass some.

    But, as my dear colleague stated above, you will have a great education but will only be able to use it in a local church setting. If you are not interested in teaching college or seminary or some other denominational appointment (whatever your denom may be?) then this may be just the thing for you!?

    Another issue to consider: they are Reformed. That is my persuasion. But if you are not already on this path, it might cause some personal as well as doctrinal issues. Make sure to factor that into the mix.

    I would not go there unless or until I knew for sure that it was the Lord's will and after much counsel with some good and Godly and trusted men.

    My two cents worth!

    Contact me via PM if you wish to talk offline!

    "That is all?"
     
    #4 Rhetorician, Apr 15, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 15, 2008
  5. nunatak

    nunatak
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    many thanks Rhet.
     
  6. TCGreek

    TCGreek
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    I'm appropriately impressed with their forthrightness on accreditation:

    Accreditation
    Since the primary purpose of RBS is to train men to become pastors of churches, we have chosen not to pursue accreditation at this time. Nevertheless, RBS is committed to maintain academic standards equal to or higher than those held by accredited institutions. For more information about accreditation and non-traditional seminary education, see Walston’s Guide to Christian Distance Learning: Earning Degrees Nontraditionally, 4th edition (Persuasion Press, 1999).

    Source
     

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