Ryan's angels?

Discussion in '2003 Archive' started by BrianT, Jul 19, 2003.

  1. BrianT

    BrianT
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  2. LadyEagle

    LadyEagle
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    Nah, those images weren't angels. I've seen angels before and they don't look like white blobs. Sorry.
     
  3. ColoradoFB

    ColoradoFB
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    I have to agree with SheEagle in that these are not angels. Camera's use visible light spectrum just as the human eye does. Nothing but flawed film, flawed optics or reflections of some kind.

    This kind of "journalism" is exploitive, IMO, and just a way for a "news" operation to pump up ratings during a rating period.
     
  4. NeilUnreal

    NeilUnreal
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    The "fish-shaped" image looks characteristic of the lens flares that occur in many video cameras and some still cameras. These occur when a light source shines into the lens either directly or obliquely (in which case, the light source itself may not be visible, just the flare).

    The fish shape is created by the diaphram which controls how much light enters the camera. On video cameras it often has the shape of a rectangular "lozenge," similar to the shape seen in the images at the website. It has that shape because it's an good way to make a diaphram that is symmetric and easy to automate. In still cameras the diaphram is sometimes round, which is why flares on still photos are often circular.

    -Neil

    p.s. On some wildlife photos you can see donut-shaped flares. These occur because the mirror telephoto lenses favored by field photographers lack a diaphram but have a donut-shaped aperature which admits the light.
     

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