School bans talking at lunch

Discussion in '2008 Archive' started by rbell, Jan 26, 2007.

  1. rbell

    rbell
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    Your tax dollars at work...makes me thankful for most of our public school folks around here, that have a little sense:

    http://www.breitbart.com/news/2007/01/25/D8MSJNO83.html

    When that principal's IQ gets to 5, she should sell.

    It currently stands at 3...but it takes 4 to grunt.
     
  2. Salty

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    I wonder what Roger Williams would have done?
     
  3. Rufus_1611

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    Sounds like another brick in the wall.
     
  4. Pastor Larry

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    So what's the issue? When I was in elementary school we couldn't talk at lunch. It didn't have anythign to do with choking. In fact, I don't remember why we couldn't talk. But no one died from it. It brought a sense of order and decency to the lunchroom. There was no great commotion or loudness or out of control kids . It wasn't hard to enforce. If you were talking, you missed recess that immediately followed lunch. If you were a habitual offender, you got paddled. And we all survived.

    So why can't a school make whatever rules it wants to?

    BTW, this isn't "your tax dollars at work." This is a Catholic school, private I assume.
     
  5. ccrobinson

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    During lunch at our church school, the kids are silent for the first 15 minutes so they'll actually eat their lunch and not spend lunchtime doing nothing but talking. I think this would have been a better solution than to have a completely silent lunch, but I don't recall getting a phone call from anybody asking my opinion. :smilewinkgrin:
     
  6. rbell

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    1. I didn't say it was tragic. But I do think it's silly, and counterproductive in the long run. Let the kids talk, and let off some steam. That can be done without letting them run wild.

    2. A school can make whatever rules it wants (within limits)...however stupid and inane they are...but that opens them up to criticism. I'm a firm believer in publicly exposing stupid school rules and policies, private or public.

    3. My bad that I made the tax dollars quote then...unless, like many Catholic schools, they receive Government funds. Odds are they do. If not, my apologies.
     
  7. Scarlett O.

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    I'm in favor of a "no-talk" lunch myself. There's nothing more out of control than a lunchroom with 80 children all shouting just to be heard. The playground is where shouting and running is to take place. And lots of it! :thumbsup:

    What we did at my school and at others that I know of is to start out by everyone whispering, including the teachers. You would be surprised how simple whispering in the lunchroom instills mannerly behavior and how yelling and screaming in the lunch room sparks negative behavior.

    Each classroom knew that if they got too loud or rowdy that their teacher would raise her hand. She doesn't put her hand down until each child at her table acknowledges her by closing his/her mouth, looking at her, and raising their hand in response to her. The first time her hand was raised, it meant, "you all are too loud, please talk softly."

    The second time her hand was raised meant, "No talking, period." And the children stop talking until they finish eating and can to outside to play.;

    The children monitored themselves quite well without the teachers having to be the bad guy. They would quiten down themselves if they thought they were too loud. It stopped teachers from having to scream themselves over a tableful of screamers.

    The children never meant to scream and yell in the lunchroom, but when you have that many children who all want to say something, each one is bound and determined that he/she is going to be heard.

     
  8. The Galatian

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    No-talk is normally enforced in elementary school lunchrooms, because the kids just don't learn to keep their voices down in a large group. If they can be trained to whisper, that works.

    If you've ever seen an elementary school lunchroom without those controls, each kid is trying to raise her voice high enough to overcome everyone else.

    Not a good thing for anyone.
     
  9. DeeJay

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    I am going to ban talking at my dinner table. My girl talks so much that she can not eat. She talks throughout dinner then when everybody else is done and leaves the table to clean up she eats (sometimes). :smilewinkgrin: :love2:
     
  10. Martin

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    I don't know the details of this news story, but when I was in elementary school we had silent lunch most of the time. There was no "no talking" rule but everyday within a few minutes one of those lunchroom ladies would yell "silent lunch". We rarely got to talk at lunch. High school was not much better because we had to fill in. So if you wanted to sit with your friends you had to make sure you were together in line and, even then, it was not guaranteed because you could still end up at different tables. And to get together in line you had to wait for each other because if you skipped you would (a) get beat up by someone who thought the school lunch was fancy eating or (b) get in school suspension for skipping in line or, if "a" occurred, fighting. On top of all that the food was nasty. Looking back it hardly seemed worth the trouble. No wonder I hated school.
     

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