Sermon Prep

Discussion in '2000-02 Archive' started by Chris Temple, Mar 4, 2002.

  1. Chris Temple

    Chris Temple
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    Pastors/preaches/teachers

    How do you do it?

    1. What day of the week do you start for Sunday's message?
    2. How long does it take you?
    3. What resources do you use?
    4. Do you write a manuscript?
    5. Do you take a manuscript into the pulpit, or an outline?
    6. anything else you do? ;) :D
     
  2. Rev. Joshua

    Rev. Joshua
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    1. I try to read the texts for the following Sunday no later than Tuesday. There's a local lectionary group on Wednesdays, the preparation for which means that Wednesday is the latest I will have looked at the texts.

    2. 10-20 hours depending on the text and the week.

    3. I start with a couple of translations (usually NRSV and NASB) of the text. Then I read either the BHS or the GNT. From there, I move to a couple of commentaries, usually starting with the New Interpreter's and Interpretation. I use the footnotes in the commentaries to point me to relevant articles and monographs that I look up as I have time.

    4. Yes, I write a full manuscript. A few samples are here.

    5. I take the manuscript with me but I treat it like an outline.

    6. Pray, a lot.

    Joshua
     
  3. TomVols

    TomVols
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    I typically take Monday off. I'll start reading and exegetical work on Tuesday. I spend all day Tuesday in study for Sun AM, Sun PM, and Wed eve Bible study. Then I divy up my time for the rest of the week as able. I'll spend a little time each day the rest of the week on each. I try to spend at least 20 hours per week in sermon work.

    I use a lot of software, translations, as many Greek/Hebrew resources as possible, then go to the commentaries. The usage of Bible study software is a huge time-saver for me.

    I do write manuscripts from time to time for the SUN AM sermon. But when I do, I take it to the pulpit and use it only as an outline. I generally take a one to two page outline printed on half sheets of paper vertically that fit well inside the Bible and are not obtrusive. I owe it to my people to be prepared, to not say the same things over and over again, but yet maintain eye contact.
     
  4. SaggyWoman

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    1.) When I am asked to speak, I usually start planning then. Usually, I have several weeks to even a month or two or three. I need that time.

    2.) Forever. I prepare until the last minute.

    3.) The Bible, and whatever else I have that might benefit the sermon.

    4.) Yes.

    5.) The first one.

    6.) Sometimes I lay out in the sun and meditate on my sermon. This usually helps to solidify what I am speaking on.
     
  5. swaimj

    swaimj
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    When asked to speak, I usually start preparing intensively about two weeks before. This work includes translation/diagramming (or plotting the story if it is a narrative). It also includes reading the passage in various versions several times a day. I like to have my outline done a week ahead. Then I begin to work on specific key phrases and transitions bwtween points that occur in the sermon. I like to have these down verbatim. Usually, I sit down the night before I preach and put my outline in its final form. Then I spend the last day praying about it, but no longer doing technical work on it. I have the opportunity to preach at my church on a Sunday night in two weeks & am very excited about doing this!
     
  6. Dr. Bob

    Dr. Bob
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    I start seven weeks ahead.

    I am working on seven Sunday morning messages at the same time that way, each in a different stage of development.

    7 weeks ahead - Read text and full context each day
    6 weeks ahead - List out all key words, details, corelating history, parallel passages
    5 weeks ahead - parse out verses from original languages
    4 weeks ahead - develop expository outline from what the text says
    3 weeks ahead - read commentaries
    2 weeks ahead - develop full preaching outline of the text
    1 week ahead - add illustration, word-smithing

    Now obviously for 7 sermon I am at different stages in the various weeks (for some I am just reading, another doing Greek, another adding info from commentaries) This gives great variety to my "work week" and NEVER lets me have a sermon that is a "rush" job and perhaps not even what the text is saying.

    And doing this for Sunday pm sermon, too. Prayer Meeting and Adult SS are more "studies" (spend 5 years in Romans verse by verse; 3 years in James) so they get different attention. I usually take an entire day and read and develop "teaching" info - not the same as a sermon.
     
  7. Rev. Sam

    Rev. Sam
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    quote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Originally posted by Chris Temple:
    Pastors/preaches/teachers
    1. What day of the week do you start for Sunday's message?
    2. How long does it take you?
    3. What resources do you use?
    4. Do you write a manuscript?
    5. Do you take a manuscript into the pulpit, or an outline?
    6. anything else you do?

    1. Monday

    2. From beginning to end?

    3. No

    4. Outline

    5. Pray for power of God
     
  8. TomVols

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    Sam,
    You don't use any resources for study?
     
  9. Michael D. Edwards

    Michael D. Edwards
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    1. As far ahead as possible!!! Definitely not only the week before.

    2. I would say that a Sunday AM sermon should usually put me at at least 8-16 hours of time on that alone.

    3. Begin with the text, usually from the NASB, then compare with other translations and try to identify any key words in the text from the original language that have particular bearing. Develop a sketch outline, then move onto commentaries if needed. Finally, see if I need to piece it together with any illustrations, trying to keep the illustrations from the Bible if possible.

    4-5. When I first began to preach, I had a full manuscript, but mostly had it memorized. Then I moved into outlines, then to expanded outlines, now I'm back at a manuscript, but find myself overprepared with it and usually move through it a little different than originally intended.

    6. Ya gotta pray, pray, pray, pray and then pray again afer you've read, read, read, read, and read again the text within its context!!!

    For what it's worth, the best book I've ever read on preaching (which are quite a few) is John MacArthur's 'Rediscovering Expository Preaching.' A great booklet is "Preaching for God's Glory," by Allistair Begg and a growing favorite of mine is "Preaching for God's Glory" by Piper! All recommended highly!

    In Christ
    Michael
     

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