Should Believers Really Take on the Ice Bucket Challenge?

Discussion in 'News / Current Events' started by righteousdude2, Aug 23, 2014.

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Should Believers Really Take on the Ice Bucket Challenge?

  1. Yes, I think, regardless of the need for fetal cells, it is worthwhile to save other lifes.

    3 vote(s)
    33.3%
  2. Not at all ....

    3 vote(s)
    33.3%
  3. No opinion ....

    1 vote(s)
    11.1%
  4. Wasn't aware it was for stem cell research, have to rethink my support!

    2 vote(s)
    22.2%
  1. righteousdude2

    righteousdude2
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  2. Zaac

    Zaac
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    Be interesting to see how many folks change their view of this challenge after that bit of info.
     
  3. righteousdude2

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    I know ...

    I was guilty of this because I never connected the two until I read the Catholic new release today! You see, Zaac, the Vatican can be good for somethings! :smilewinkgrin: I should have connected the dots, as I was aware of the comments and protests years back that stem cell research would benefit ALS patients. However, it was years ago, and slipped my mind!

    Great point! What got me think was the OP on a Baptist church that took the challenge, and it went horribly wrong!
     
  4. questdriven

    questdriven
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    The link mentions donating the money to a charity that doesn't use stem cells as an alternative, so...well, I'd still do it. Maybe in making the video one could mention that and raise awareness about it along with ALS.

    I voted no opinion.
     
  5. Zaac

    Zaac
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    I always take a wait and see approach with stuff like the IBC that has become so popular. I have to vet stuff or wait for it to be vetted before I put money towards it.

    I particularly don't like to do stuff when it almost becomes faddish.. Probably one of the reasons I've never watched a single episode of Duck Dynasty. :laugh:
     
  6. Revmitchell

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    There is nothing wrong with the ice bucket challenge. Just be careful which ALS orgs you give money too.
     
  7. righteousdude2

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    Thanks

    Are their groups using non fetal cells for stem cell research? Your comment interests me. If you could elaborate?
     
  8. annsni

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    From my understanding, most research is not done on aborted babies because stem cells from these are just not reliable. Cord blood and adult stem cells seem to be better. Most of the research is fine - but I believe one single study is using aborted baby cells
     
  9. Gina B

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    I don't think being part of abortion is escapable for anyone unless they live in a cave.
    Some power plants use aborted babies, included in medical waste, to produce our electric, and our taxes are used in some places to fund abortions.
    While I think any fundraiser (or much else) that uses guilt and peer pressure to get something is kinda messed up to get involved in, it seems like it's at least less selfish than using electricity.
     
  10. Deacon

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    ALS website concerning stem cell research [LINK]

    From their site -

    Overview

    The discovery that human embryonic stem cells can be isolated and propagated in the lab with the potential of developing into all tissues of the body is a major medical breakthrough. But it has raised ethical concerns. Stem cells are also present in adults, scientists now find. If there were a way to stimulate resident stem cells to replace dying cells, the limitations of transplantation could be overcome, as well as the ethical issues.

    What are the types of embryonic stem cells?

    Human embryonic stem cells are derived from fertilized embryos less than a week old. When a sperm fertilizes an egg and creates a single cell, this cell has the potential to form a complete organism. In the first hours after fertilization, this cell divides into identical, so-called totipotent cells. After approximately four days, the cells start to specialize and form a hollow sphere of cells called a blastocyst.

    [snip]

    The discovery that human embryonic stem cells can be isolated and propagated in culture with the potential of developing into all tissues of the body is a major medical breakthrough. However it has raised a great deal of ethical questions.

    Adult stem cells vs. embryonic stem cells

    Stem cells are important in early human development, yet they persist into adulthood. The presence of bone marrow stem cells in adults has been known for a long time. These stem cells give rise to all cells of the blood system. More recently, stem cells have been discovered in the adult brain and spinal cord. There are several approaches now in human clinical trails that utilize adult stem cells (such as blood forming cells and cartilage forming cells).

    However, because adult cells are already specialized, their potential to regenerate damaged tissue is more limited. Another limitation is their inability to proliferate in culture. Therefore, obtaining clinically significant amounts of adult stem cells may prove to be difficult.
     

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