Silver and Gold?

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by richard n koustas, Aug 27, 2006.

  1. richard n koustas

    richard n koustas
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    If I'm reading this correctly, the fathers' tradition was redemption by silver and gold? I know that in Exodus 30:11-16 silver was used for redemption. But when was gold used?
     
  2. richard n koustas

    richard n koustas
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    BUMP

    anybody?
     
  3. Scarlett O.

    Scarlett O.
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    Hi, Richard.

    My take on this verse is not that redemption by silver and gold was the tradition of the fathers.

    It's that the tradition of the fathers is what the people in question were rescued from and not by silver and gold.

    I read it like this (my words)....."You know that silver and gold did not rescue you from the vain and spiritually empty lifestyle handed down to you by family tradition....."
     
  4. Ransom

    Ransom
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    It's simply a contrast between the perishable things of this world ("silver and gold," v. 18), and the imperishable things of heaven ("the precious blood of Christ," v. 19).

    The author of Hebrews continually draws the same kind of contrast, for example between the yearly sacrifices that could never take away sin, and the single sacrifice of Christ that took it away for all time (Heb. 10:12).
     
  5. richard n koustas

    richard n koustas
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    i would agree with this, but the phrase: "[received] by tradition from your fathers" makes it sound like the redemption by silver and/or gold was passed down to the current generation (as a tradition). As i mentioned in the OP, I can find when silver was used in the OT for redemption, but not gold.
     
  6. Scarlett O.

    Scarlett O.
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    Again, it isn't the redemption by silver and gold that is being pass down by tradition. It's the vain and empty way of life that's been passed down by the fathers.

    And Peter is reminding us that we weren't rescued from that vain existence by perishable things. And he isn't talking exactly about silver and gold, for he says "like" silver and gold.

    "Forasmuch as ye know that ye were not redeemed (with corruptible things, like silver and gold), from your vain manner of life received by the tradition from your fathers..."

    The emphasis on the silver and gold is moot. He could have said any costly, material item....pearls, expensive oils.....

    The emphasis is on the traditional lifestyle of the fathers that was vain and spiritually empty....and even silver and gold could not have rescued us from that nor pearls nor anything.

    Just my 2 cents.....



     
  7. Allan

    Allan
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    Hi Richard,

    Maybe I can help clarify. Notice what the object of verb 'recieved' is, it is the word which preceeds it, that being the word(s) vain conversation (this is another word for life style) and not refering to the silver or gold.

    First, The tradition spoken of here is refering to religiousness (keeping of the law) that was vain. It is the same vain religion that Jesus conteneded with and set the captive sinner free from.

    Second, The silver and gold piece - Yes silver was what was used in procuring redemtion in the temporary means. Gold could have easily been given like silver (nothing states they couldn't) but it would be much like we would give a 10 dollar bill for something less than 10 and expect change back. The symbolism spoken of by others that responded correlates to this.

    This vanity that you can do/or give God some thing and expect God to honor you (religion/good works) was the folly (traditions past down in understanding) of their fathers. Also comparing in thier veiw that you could not buy what is incorruptable (salvation) with corruptable (money/works).

    Hope it distinquished the two becuase it is not speaking of the silver and gold being the vain tradions but their vain (religious) conversation (lifestye) that was the object of the what was received from the traditions of their fathers.
     
    #7 Allan, Sep 1, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 1, 2006

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