Study Bibles

Discussion in 'Pastoral Ministries' started by Pete Richert, Feb 28, 2003.

  1. Pete Richert

    Pete Richert
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    For all of you Pastors and informed laymen who use them often, could you list the strengths and weekness of different study Bibles available. I am hoping to find infomation on Ryrie, Scofield, MacArthur, NIV, Nelson, Haper, Thompson Chain Reference, Geneva (Reformation), or any others you might know.
     
  2. MissAbbyIFBaptist

    MissAbbyIFBaptist
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    I'm not a preacher, but I do have a King James Scofield Study Bible. {The old Scofield one, that is} I love it. All I have to do is look at the letter beside a word, and I can learn it's meaning. His notes at the bottom of the page also really help me understand certian passages of scripture better. Now I don't recomend the new study Bible they've put out. Mainly because it wouldn't be Scofield's notes, since he's been dead for quite a few years.
    I wouldn't know about any of the other study Bibles.
    ~Abby [​IMG]

    [ March 02, 2003, 05:54 PM: Message edited by: Abby_the_IFBaptist ]
     
  3. Marathon Man

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    Just a layman's opinion, but my personal favorite study Bible is the Thompson Chain Reference, because it does not rely on annotations, but instead uses Scripture to interpret Scripture through its excellent reference system. Also, the bindings and overall craftsmanship are first class.

    One caveat, while it is avaiable in KJV, NKJV, NIV, and 1977NASB, it is not available in my two preferred translations, the ESV and 1995NASB.
     
  4. neal4christ

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    I have all of those except for the Harper and Geneva Bibles.

    I don't use any of them a lot, but I highly recommend the Thompson, but as Marthon Man said, it doesn't come in the ESV or NASB1995 yet (hopefully it will). The Ryrie is good, but I don't agree with everything he says. But he is good over all. The NIV notes don't really try to deal with controversial doctrines. The Nelson Bible is good, and the same with Scofield, although I have some issues with his notes, such as his creation ideas. I like the MacArthur Bible a lot, tons of notes, very conservative, sound teaching in it. However, he is Calvinistic, so some might not like it.

    Even though I don't have them, I think (I may be wrong) the Harper one may be rather liberal and the Geneva one is Calvinistic.

    Most all the ones you listed are decent and fairly sound. However, like Marathon Man, I like the Thompson because it doesn't have notes. I do use my MacArthur more than most of the others.

    Neal
     
  5. Dr. Bob

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    Had an "old" Scofield Reference Bible since 1957 (on my fourth one). KJV and most conservative and dispensational.

    Enjoy MacArthur Study Bible. NKJV and very strong reformed (calvinistic) as is John. And baptistic in most areas.

    Best notes on the New Geneva (Reformers) Study Bible. But very covenant and amill, so read with care. But great scholarship.
     
  6. Ernie Brazee

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    IFor all of you Pastors and informed laymen who use them often, could you list the strengths and weekness of different study Bibles available. I am hoping to find infomation on Ryrie, Scofield, MacArthur, NIV, Nelson, Haper, Thompson Chain Reference, Geneva (Reformation), or any others you might know.

    Is it any wonder prolpe are confused. Of the above which is the authority if there is a disagreement.

    Just a backward country boy who believes the bible when it says compare scripture with scripture

    Have a good day [​IMG]

    (edited for spelling)
     
  7. Dr. Bob

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    This a.m. in Adult Sunday School a layman brought a "Dakes Annotated Bible" that had to be about the best combination of a HUGE commentary with a KJV text. Never had seen one previously and was impressed. Like a whole bookshelf in one volume.

    Just thought I'd share that as one to consider.
     
  8. MissAbbyIFBaptist

    MissAbbyIFBaptist
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    While I do have an Old Scofield, I don't hold to a particular study Bible. I do hold to a particular version, and by now, ya'll know which one the is! ;)
    Wouldn't know aboutCalvanistic beliefs, or Geneva Bibles, that one DR. Bob was talking about, I just know what I hold to. Ya'll hae a good evening.
    ~Abby [​IMG]
     
  9. Mike G

    Mike G
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    All - Be careful with the Dake's Study Bible.

    The fact is clearly seen that Mr. Dake put much work into this reference tool. However, there are severe problems with the theology contained in this work. For instance, heresies abound concerning subjects such as the nature and attributes of God, Soteriology, and Christology—just to name a few. Furthermore, many Word-Faith teachers, such as Benny Hinn and Kenneth Copeland, have verifiably used Dake as a source of their quizzical doctrines.

    See the link below for entire article.

    Dake's Study Bible
     
  10. Dr. Bob

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    Will look into that and check with the Deacon who showed it to me. Thanks for the heads up and the link.
     
  11. Mike G

    Mike G
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    Dr. Bob - here's some more info on the Dake's Study Bible from the Christian Research Institute:

    Dake’s is the product of 43 years of study and is one of the few study Bibles that has more words in its helps than in the Bible. Most of Finis Jennings Dake’s materials are set in two columns that appear on each page beside the two columns of biblical text. His introduction claims 500,000 cross-references, 35,000 notes and comments, 8,000 outlines, and 2,000 illustrations. Many of these materials are lists of observations from the text, but much is interpretive, with emphasis on prophecy, healing, and the miraculous.
    This work contains a great deal that is speculative and unorthodox, such as Dake’s belief in God’s "spirit body" with "bodily parts" that "goes from place to place" (pp. 96-97 [NT]), his strong teaching on racial segregation (e.g., pp. 148 [OT] and 159 [NT]), and his dogmatism on just about every subject he addresses. The Dake’s study Bible cannot be recommended to journal readers, charismatic or not.


    Here's the link to the entire article. It gives a good summary of numerous study Bibles.

    Study Bibles
     
  12. Clay Knick

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    Harper Study Bible
    (Comes in RSV and NRSV. Good notes by
    the late Harold Lindsell. Text reads
    across page. The first study Bible I
    owned [RSV]).

    NIV Study Bible/NASB Study Bible
    (Excellent notes, I think the
    NASB is better because the NASB
    is a better version for study. The
    NIV is good for reading, but not
    technical study in my opinion.)

    New Oxford Annotated
    (Comes in RSV and NRSV. NT notes
    arae better than OT. First and
    second editions are better than the
    3rd which, in my opinion, is terrible.
    The 3rd edition bends too far to the
    theological left for me.)

    The NASB Study Bible is the best for
    the money in my opinion.

    There will be an ESV study edition in the
    future.

    Clay
     
  13. Jude

    Jude
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    A good study Bible, IMHO.

    Good Study Bible, yet biased toward Calvinism


    Agree. The 3rd edition has been taken-over by a liberal element that is sympathetic to the radial lesbi-gay agenda. 2nd edition is very good.

    As far as Study Bibles go, I'd recommend the 2nd edition NRSV, the Oxford Annotated RSV, or the New Jerusalem Study Bible.
     
  14. baptistteacher

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    My favorite study Bible is the Life Application Bible. It has lots of maps right in the text, so you don't have to turn to the back to try to find a location. The maps have info regarding the passage on that page.

    The notes are designed to help you apply the Word to everyday life. (Hence the name - Life Application). I have a hardback copy that I bought used, and when I was ordained the church gave me a leather-bound one.

    While having notes in a Bible is nice, one of the best study Bibles I use just has the center-column references.
     
  15. rlvaughn

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    For a "study" Bible, I recommend a black-letter Bible with no comments or references. I like a wide-margin so I can write in it. I'm not opposed to using a study Bible or reading commentaries, but I believe the first thing we need is to read what God has to say to us, then we need to meditate upon it. Then we need to study the words by original language and lexical & grammatical type helps. We also need to study the meaning of English words (or whatever language of translation we are reading). After that it is done, then we should look for the thoughts of others. My first recommendation after that would be the Thompson Chain-Reference Bible. Beyond that I prefer more detailed commentaries to study Bibles, though I do own Scofield (KJV) and Ryrie (NASB).
     
  16. Jim1999

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    I quite agree with Brother Robert (Vaughn). The best study Bible is the one you read and understand; large print and no additional notes. I happen to own a loose-leaf study Bible. I can add all my own notes on the extra pages inserted for that purpose.

    The Thompson Chain is also an excellent choice. The Scofield Bible I own does prevent dust from collecting on other books of value.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  17. Preacher Nathan Knight

    Preacher Nathan Knight
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    I use the KJV Scofield study bible. It is a great help.
     
  18. Dan Todd

    Dan Todd
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    Grew up with Old Scofield - my first study Bible given to me by my parents - has a good concordance. (Also have a new Scofield - do not like it as much as the old one)

    My dad gave me a Dake study Bible - heed the above warnings (I've always felt it was weak in the eternal security area) - however many of the lists in the helps are excellent starting places for Bible study.

    My church gave me a MacArthur study Bible for Christmas one year - I spent the next three years reading through all the helps as I read it chapter by chapter. (Weak area - no concordance - tough to find verses when you can only remember a word or two)

    I bought a Thompson chain - the cross reference chains are great for study.
     
  19. go2church

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    review of the bibles I have or had:
    Ryrie is dispensational so I don't use it much

    Geneva/ Reformation is good but is very calvinistic so you have to careful, but the scholarship is great

    Harper is very good as well

    Open bible is handy for topical stuff but also dispensational

    Macarthur is fine but I would rather have is commentaries then his study bible leans toward dispensationalism and calvinism

    Thompson has ok but I don't like the notes being in the back and all that flipping. Also has some campbellite notes in the old testatment

    Scofield I don't really care for, see ryrie

    Rice reference bible see scofield

    Life Application is ok but avoids any strong opinions on tough scripture

    I have given most of these bibles away and now only use text bibles with some cross reference notes and wide margins
     
  20. christfollower55

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    i like the scofield study bible KJV. I like the middle and bottom footnotes. it was my first study bible i think think i will always use them. i also like the rainbow bible. KJV

    GOD BLESS AMERICA
     

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