Supporting Christian Schools

Discussion in '2004 Archive' started by Rosell, Mar 7, 2004.

  1. Rosell

    Rosell
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    Many members of the church I pastor send their children to a couple of local Christian schools. We've had the discussion about having a Christian school in our own church, and at the present time it isn't feasible. Also, there are two that are fairly close, one K-8 affiliated with an Assembly of God church and one PK-12 affiliated with a Southern Baptist church.

    We've decided to commit budget funds under the category of "Discipleship ministry" to the schools where members of our church attend, rather than try to start a third school and compete with the others for students. We will probably start doing this in the fall. We won't ask for a board seat, or for any favors (tuition discounts for members, etc) because we strongly believe that the next generation of Christian leaders must come from good Christian schools.

    A couple of questions: 1. If you belong to a church that has its own Christian school, how would you approach receiving money from another church for support of your school. 2. If you don't have a Christian school at your church, do you help other church schools?
     
  2. gb93433

    gb93433
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    Because we strongly believe that the next generation of Christian leaders must come from good Christian schools.

    I would disagree with you in one way. I have been to secular schools and to an SBC seminary. Some of the strongest I have seen grew up under communism. Adversity strengthens. Christians must get out in the real world and get bumps and bruises before they get real strong in their witness.

    I believe the real preparation is not in the school but in the model they see everyday. Education does not make a Christian nor a strong one, but obedience. Don't ever promote Christianmity as a school or something to be learned just through academics. I did not grow up in a Christian home and still stand strong. I was led to Christ by a man who did not grow up in a Christian home who later became a missionary to Germany. Two of my friends in high school were Christians and never said one word to me about Christ. One was the son of a Baptist pastor. He went onto study at a Baptist University. Training begins in the example not the knowledge. I have never seen an obedient Christian who didn't thirst for God and the knowledge of Him. We must get people out of their comfort zone as Jesus did and send them into the world.

    For four years I taught woodworking. At first it seemed like I was often asked the same questions until a man I studied under suggested that I always be making a piece of funriture. When I did that solved a lot of my problems teaching. They saw how it was done. I no longer told them but showed them on my own work. They saw the finished piece I was making instead of another student's. They saw the details of how to do it. The student's work inproved and so did morale. Their success went way up.
     
  3. Daniel

    Daniel
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    I am a Christian School Teacher in an independent Christian School in PA. We have no church attached to us. We have 500 students from over 117 different churches. Our key to success is getting the students into real-life situations. Nearly our entire freshman class is on a missions trips as I write. We get the students into all kinds of community service venues. We ask the students to please do something in their local church. Our classes use higher level thinking skill teaching methods and learning models. (We heavily use cooperative learning so that students can draw from students.) The success of a Christian school is not in the school itself, but in the school's APPLICATION of what it is teaching in a real world context...get it outside the walls!
     

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