Supreme Court refuses to block 'Choose Life' license plates

Discussion in '2000-02 Archive' started by Johnv, Dec 2, 2002.

  1. Johnv

    Johnv
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    Thought this was interesting:

    WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Supreme Court ended an effort to block specialty car license plates in Louisiana with the slogan "Choose Life.'

    Louisiana is one of seven states that have authorized such car tags, and abortion rights supporters argued that the state was giving a forum only to anti-abortion views.

    Justices on Monday refused without comment to review the tag opponents' appeal.

    In 2000, a federal judge had stopped the state from distributing the plates, which have a picture of a baby wrapped in a blanket in the beak of a brown pelican, the state bird. But earlier this year an appeals court said the groups did not have standing to sue.

    Lawsuits have been filed in other states over the plates, contending they violate the separation of church and state. Besides Louisiana, states with "Choose Life" laws are Alabama, Florida, Hawaii, Mississippi, Oklahoma and South Carolina. Leaders in other states are considering offering them.

    Louisiana charges an extra $25 for the special tags to raise money for organizations that counsel expectant mothers about adoption. A council of religious groups advises the state on how to spend the money.

    Simon Heller with the Center for Reproductive Law and Policy, representing the plate opponents, told justices in court papers that the "scheme creates a 'symbolic union' of the state of Louisiana with fundamentalist Christian organizations" and could promote religion.

    Roy Mongrue Jr., an assistant attorney general in Louisiana, said that the legislature may use license plates to encourage pregnant women to consider adoption and other alternatives to abortion. "The state, acting through ... its democratic process, has the right to speak this message," he wrote in court papers.

    The case is Henderson v. Stalder, 02-523.
     
  2. Baptist Believer

    Baptist Believer
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    Actually, "Choose Life" is a pro-choice view... you're suggesting that a choice is rightfully in our hands.

    An anti-abortion view would be "Don't kill".
     
  3. JamesJ

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    Well said BB !!

    [​IMG]
     
  4. bb_baptist

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    (CNSNews.com) - The Louisiana Supreme Court has refused to hear the appeal of abortion supporters who are battling the state's decision to allow "Choose Life" license plates.

    Six states now offer such a license plate, and a seventh plans to do so, once lawsuits are settled. "I'm confident that South Carolina's tag will be freed up here pretty soon," said Russ Amerling, national publicity coordinator of ChooseLife, Inc. Proceeds from the tag, which costs $22, will be used to encourage adoption for women with unplanned pregnancies. Money raised from sales of the plate will fund maternity homes, crisis pregnancy centers and certain non-profit adoption agencies, according to ChooseLife, Inc.'s website.

    So far, the group has raised $1.4 million nationwide, $1.3 million of it in Florida alone, where the program was first launched. The National Organization for Women filed a lawsuit against the State of Florida in 1999, trying to prevent distribution of the plate, but that suit was later dismissed
     
  5. Gina B

    Gina B
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    Why don't the people opposed just insist on having a counter plate passed?
    Gina
     
  6. stubbornkelly

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    Woo-hoo! Some logic, finally! I don't get it either.

    I think, though, the issue is that monies collected by the state are going to a pro-life organization [and to be brutally honest, there aren't very many non-religious arguments against abortion (most of the arguments against are at least indirectly based on religious views)], and some people get riled that it violates establishment. But that one's something of a stretch, methinks.
     
  7. KeeperOfMyHome

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    Ditto, Gina! But that I like what somebody else said as well: "choose life" is a choice! Isn't that what the pro-abortion rank is all about? Having a choice!

    Julia
     
  8. pdp27

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    So what. Who cares what the arguments are based on as long as they're valid. Should a Christian not use his guide, the Bible, to seek out God's 'view' on this or any issue be it political, social, or moral?
     
  9. stubbornkelly

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    No, I'm not saying it matters morally. But it is used politically in cases like this one. If the pro-life groups are largely Christian in makeup and leadership, and the state is sponsoring a program that sends money to such an organization (even if no state money is going there), the not completely invalid argument could be made that it violates establishment. That's all I'm saying.
     
  10. Bro. James Reed

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    The one guy said, "it could promote religion." What's wrong with that? Does he really think that anyone like him is going to say, "Gee, I see that pro-life license plate, I think I'll go to church, even though I don't want to." How stupid does his argument sound!!! Is he afraid of going to church. Is he afraid that others might go to church. If that's the case, then HE is imposing atheism on everyone. Why doesn't he just try to make a law not allowing anyone to go to church? BTW, if they want their own plate, go right ahead. I suppose it would say something like Choose Death. If that's the message they want to send, by all means send it. Maybe it would bring some people to our side. But, oh, then THAT would promote religion, too. He would have to fight the pro-abortionists in court.
     
  11. Johnv

    Johnv
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    The one guy said, "it could promote religion." What's wrong with that?

    For one, it's illegal (first amendment: the state is forbidden from respecting an establishment of religion).

    For two, Baptist congregations are generally in favor of separation of church and state, so if the plates serve to largely promote religion, we would doctrinally be against them.

    Thankfully, the court believes that the plates do not promote religion (and neither do I).
     
  12. Bro. James Reed

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    John--I would appreciate if you would read the entire article before you question what I said. The point was, regardless of whether it does or does not promote religion, even if he thought it did, is that going to change his mind? Is he afraid of this?
     

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