Survey for Young Fundamentalists

Discussion in '2005 Archive' started by Greg Linscott, Jan 29, 2005.

  1. Greg Linscott

    Greg Linscott
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    The following is an email from Jason Janz, on staff at South Sheridan Baptist Church in Colorado:
    If you fit the bill, please take the survey!
     
  2. Pastor Larry

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    I think the survey is targeted to the historic fundamentalists who believe in the core doctrines of Scripture as well as separatism. I am not sure this is an open-ended "anyone take it" survey. A good many of those here who might consider themselves fundamentalists would not be considered fundamentalist by the group heading this survey up.
     
  3. Greg Linscott

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    Point taken, but the survey should bear that out. Among the topics covered are where you received your education, and I would anticipate that would help in filtering the answers submitted.

    As to separatism, if I'm not mistaken, that is one of the ideas that many fear our current generation of Fundamentalists is lacking in. It does get pretty specific on that topic. And after all, many of those you refer to share at least some common heritage with those who you identify as more "historic" fundamentalists. Hey, 25-30 years ago, wasn't Jack Hyles still speaking in places like BJU and Marantha? Weren't many good fundamentalists reading The Sword of the Lord and sending their kids to school in wearing ACE ties and culottes? I'm sure the descendants of "that crowd" are losing a segment of their young people to the greener pastures of new evangelicalism and church marketing movement (and worse) just like we are.

    Are you young enough to take it, Larry? It does ask some pretty interesting (though perhaps somewhat predictable) questions.
     
  4. LRL71

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    I am 33 years old and took the survey. I graduated from Clearwater Christian College and attended, but did not graduate from, Calvary Baptist Theological Seminary. The questions were pretty well balanced, IMHO. The issue of separation was covered in the questions, and I didn't think that it either didn't cover enough nor too much. I am expecting the survey answers, which will come out sometime in early March, to have some interesting comments and analysis. I would encourage others who are under 35 to go to the website and take the survey; it took me about 40 minutes to complete.
     
  5. aefting

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    I think they ought to let all age groups take the survey to see how or if the answers change over a generation. It does appear that they will take answers from the above 35 crowd, though.

    Andy
     
  6. Pastor Larry

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    My post was intended to be more of a question ...

    I think it would be interesting to let the older men take it. I am too old to take it by a few months. I, just to read it, clicked that was 35 and then read through the questions. There are some interesting things. I didn't see any place that they would take answers from anyone over 35, at least if you admit it ...

    However, I am a young fundamentalist with a fundamentalist heritage in life and education and intend to stay one. I do not intend to be a traditional fundamentalist however, at least as I see it.

    I think there are some serious issues to address. I am not confident that this will address them but I don't know. I don't think there is much of a movement left anymore. It is more of an ideal that people see differently.
     
  7. aefting

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    They let you answer the questions and submit the survey even if you select over 35. Now what they do with those results is another matter...

    I think many people's responses will change after they get out of school and into actual ministry. College students are still forming convictions and tend to be idealistic. The responses from the 30-40 age group are probably most indicative of where the movement is going.

    Andy
     
  8. 4His_glory

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    aefting,

    I agree with you concering college students, however, I do not think that the 30-40 age group is the most indicative of where the movement is going. I would enlarge it to include those who are newly in the ministry say 27-29.
     
  9. ForHisGlory15

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    Now that we're debating age, if we really want the survey to be indicative of where we are headed, then it seems logical that it should include the younger leaders in fundamentalism who are not only in the best position to activate change, but also desirous of doing so. I know many pastors and college/seminary administrators that are actively seeking to identify and correct problems, and most of them are in their 40's. (Actually, let me make that a 35-55 age bracket.)
     
  10. ForHisGlory15

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    I got sidetracked as to the purpose of the survey as I read through this thread. In rereading the initial survey purpose, I think the age bracket is appropriate for gathering the desired information about the thought processes of the younger fundamentalists. It's not a survey to give insight into our direction, so my last post would be irrelevant.
     
  11. Dr. Bob

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    Thanks for the input. I think the beliefs and practice of young fundamentalists will shock MY generation.

    My two sons and son-in-law fit the demographic and I will zip this to them.
     
  12. LRL71

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    ^^^

    Dr. Bob,

    In what areas do you think that the survey would 'shock' those who are of your generation?

    My guesses would be:

    1. Personal separation areas are not as stringent as they were of previous generations. I think that this would include those of us who do drink alcholic beverages, listen to and use CCM in our churches, and our dress styles are more trendy (although mine aren't personally).
    2. The Bible versions issue will divide even further: KJV-onlyists becoming more like those who lived in the 1960's versus those who use MV's being more contemporary. I do think that the KJV-only issue will diminish in 'popularity' in the next 20 years.
    3. Those of us who are younger tend to be more Calvinistic and will eventually develop radically different philosophies of the ministry. My church has already embraced the following tenets, some of which are due to following Calvinist soteriology: no invitation calls after each/every service, no Sunday evening church, beginnings of cell group/home Bible studies in place of Wednesday night prayer meetings/services. Due to my church having to meet in a High School auditorium, we meet on Saturday nights. Evangelism concentrates on building personal relationships, moving away from camp-meetings, door-to-door evangelism, and revival meetings at church.

    These are a few examples in which I think that the movement called fundamentalism will go. I would agree with Pastor Larry that the movement is no longer existing as it was in the 20th century, as we are most certainly in the 'last days' before Christ comes to rapture His bride, the church.
     
  13. Dr. Bob

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    Agree with your assessment.

    1. Separation (from the world) was based mostly on cultural and sectarian views - NOT from Scripture. I hope most of it dies a rapid death.

    When my children were growing up (we home schooled) we would cover issues and ALWAYS seek Bible basis. Very little out there, my friend, in the things ifbX fusses about!

    2. KJVonly sect is the most viciously divisive form of liberalism to hit our movement. And the widespread acceptance of this error is laid at the feet of weak believers (and weaker pastors) who have not been educated in the rudiments of the faith and are sucked into believeing a lie.

    3. Emphasis OFF the formalism of services, even the scheduling of services and on to personal and relational worship, evangelism, etc. Deeper preaching of doctrine (like Reformed) and family-oriented ministry instead of a galjillion programs. MacArthur and Piper and Warren will replace the old gurus of circusdom like Hyles, Malone, or Dixon in short order.
     
  14. Siegfried

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    I took it a couple days ago. I kind of hated to take part in another activity related to the fundamentalist "movement," but I couldn't stand not being a part of the whole thing and having access to the results. I can't wait to see them, but it's kind of like a guilty pleasure. I feel like a moth drawn irresistably to the bug zapper or a rubber-necker at a traffic accident.

    Maybe it will do some good--who knows? I doubt that any attitudes or theology will really change among younger or older fundies, but communication is good, and it will probably be a step in the right direction at least to get everything out on the table.

    Did any of the rest of you who are Calvinistic feel as though there was no right answer to many of the questions, particularly in the soteriology section? I also would have liked to see some more questions on hermeneutics and the various distinctions within dispensational and reformed theology. And I had no idea what to do with the question about whether the rapture will occur in my lifetime.
     
  15. savedgirl63026

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    I took it, as an 18 year old...I skipped some questions though, one I wasn't quite so sure about,etc.
     
  16. Pastor Larry

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    I would swear that they changed that after I looked at it. I don't see how I would have missed it.

    I agree for the most part, although I think the 25-35 age are, as a whole, more inclined away from what has traditionally been known as fundamentalism. This survey will be interesting. I don't interact with anyone that I went to college with (except maybe one or two on this board that probably don't know who I am and that don't know that I know who they are ... :D ) ... I interact with guys I went to seminary with ... so my perspectives are certainly slanted to some degree. I think that some would probably consider me a maverick of sorts. But who knows.

    Personally I don't think fundamentalism has any uniting feature that brings us together. We don't have a "common enemy" per se. In fact, we can't even decide on who the "enemy" is. Modern evangelicalism has greatly splintered. In a generation affected by post modernism, we are much less likely to have an "all or nothing" approach to issues that aren't clearly defined.

    But in the end, I fear we might spend too much time talking about fundamentalism (which I think is important) and trying to win people to our position from other positions (which I think is less important). The best way to create a new generation of fundamentalists is to evangelize them, and teach them.
     
  17. Pastor Larry

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    Just took the survey. There are some questions that cannont really be answered.

    The question on limited atonement was poorly worded. I ended up checking the limited atonement option, but marveling at how badly it was worded.

    The church government option is poorly worded. It seems not to reflect that pastors and elders are in fact the same office. We can have multiple elders or a single elder, ruling elders and teaching elders, but you can't have pastors and elders. When you have a pastor, you have an elder.

    Just a lot of wierd questions. I didn't look like it was put together with enough thought and study ...
     
  18. Greg Linscott

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    Here is where I first heard about the survey:

    http://graceandpeace.us/

    There is a running conversation under the comments line. Jason Janz appears to be monitoring the conversation. He might find your observations helpful, Larry.
     
  19. superdave

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    I agree, I actually checked I don't know, because neither of them sounded right! The Limited one didn't go far enough

    I agree with Dr. Bob. The answers given by his sons, and myself would probably shock many of those who we actually respect and admire as the older generation of Fundamentalists (except our fathers, since they stopped being shocked by us a long time ago)

    I don't think its a bad thing that many young fundies actually ask for Biblical support for what you preach to them. Its maybe time in many cases for those with their own petty doctrines and standards to put up or shut up.

    (BTW, our parents, Dr. Bob's kids and I, have some of the greatest fundamentalist parents of all time , although we aren't always sure about Dr. Bob ;) )
     
  20. Dr. Bob

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    HEY HEY HEY! :eek: :eek: :eek:

    That's it! No more birthday gifts from your Uncle Bob, Dave. And face it, you always wished you were a Griffin, right? I coulda used a son like you.

    Oh, wait, I never gave you any gifts anyway . . . :rolleyes:
     

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